Prof. Benedetto Marelli

Paul M Cook Career Development Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Primary DLC

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

MIT Room: 1-348

Areas of Interest and Expertise

Active Packaging; Moisture/Oxygen
Bio-Inspired Materials
Self-Assembly
Mechanical and Optical Properties
3D Printing
Emerging Technologies

Research Summary

Benedetto (Ben) Marelli’s research group works in the area of structural biopolymers, biomineralization and self-assembly. By using biofabrication strategies, the research group designs bio-inspired materials that work at the biotic/abiotic interface to prevent or mitigate environmental impact. His interests and collaborative opportunities span widely across the department. He brings a wealth of experience, and a strong focus on engineering and innovation from a multiple-scale perspective with interests that include mechanical and optoelectronic properties of natural polymers, biocomposites, additive manufacturing, and emerging technologies.

Recent Work

  • Video
    June 25, 2019MIT Faculty Feature Duration: 20:14

    Benedetto Marelli

    Paul M. Cook Career Development Professor, Associate Professor of Civil, and Environmental Engineering, MIT CEE

    February 12, 2019MIT Faculty Feature Duration: 20:14

    Benedetto Marelli

    Paul M. Cook Career Development Professor, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT CEE

    November 22, 2017Conference Video Duration: 29:35

    Benedetto Marelli - RD2017

    Structural biopolymers – using Nature’s building blocks as an inspiration for advanced manufacturing

    Structural biopolymers are materials engineered by Nature as building blocks of living matter. These materials have unique and compelling properties that allow for their assembly and degradation with minimal energy requirements as well as their performance at the biotic/abiotic interface. By combining basic material principles with advanced fabrication techniques, it is possible to define new strategies to drive the assembly of structural biopolymers in advanced materials with unconventional forms and functions such as edible coating for perishable food, inkjet prints of silk fibroin that change in color in the presence of bacteria, three dimensional monoliths that can be heated by exposure to infrared light and flexible keratin-made photonic crystals.

    2017 MIT Research and Development Conference