2021 MIT Digital Technology and Strategy Conference

Accelerating Success Through Industrial Digital Transformation

October 13, 2021 - October 14, 2021
2021 MIT Digital Technology and Strategy Conference
Conference

Location

Boston Marriott Cambridge
50 Broadway
Cambridge, MA 02142

Overview

The 21st century restarted in 2021. The companies that implemented Digital Transformation effectively thrived during the worldwide pandemic. Digital Transformation has reduced disruptions in business, across all industries, and new digital technologies and strategies have continued to emerge faster than ever. MIT has been no exception to this uninterrupted innovation. This annual MIT Digital Technology and Strategy Conference explores the latest research from across the Institute and its potential impact across industries. The conference highlights several of the areas where MIT continues to generate cutting-edge research in numerous areas, such as quantum computing, satellite communications, AI, robotics, cybersecurity, predictive analytics, digital business and others. Join MIT’s faculty, MIT-connected startups and industry executives as they discuss their latest innovations, meant to be practical and actionable solutions to accelerate real-world innovation and industry success. The program also allows for opportunities for networking with top MIT researchers and industry executives.

  • Overview

    The 21st century restarted in 2021. The companies that implemented Digital Transformation effectively thrived during the worldwide pandemic. Digital Transformation has reduced disruptions in business, across all industries, and new digital technologies and strategies have continued to emerge faster than ever. MIT has been no exception to this uninterrupted innovation. This annual MIT Digital Technology and Strategy Conference explores the latest research from across the Institute and its potential impact across industries. The conference highlights several of the areas where MIT continues to generate cutting-edge research in numerous areas, such as quantum computing, satellite communications, AI, robotics, cybersecurity, predictive analytics, digital business and others. Join MIT’s faculty, MIT-connected startups and industry executives as they discuss their latest innovations, meant to be practical and actionable solutions to accelerate real-world innovation and industry success. The program also allows for opportunities for networking with top MIT researchers and industry executives.


Agenda


Machine Learning and Data Science in Process Automation, Beyond Robotics
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
Brian Anthony
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.


How to Maximize Returns from Data Monetization
Principal Research Scientist,
Center for Information Systems Research
Barbara Wixom
Principal Research Scientist,
Center for Information Systems Research

Barbara joined MIT Sloan in June 2013 to serve as a Principal Research Scientist at the MIT Sloan Center for Information Systems Research (CISR). MIT CISR was established in 1974 as a non-profit research group, and it currently is funded by 85 corporate sponsors and patrons. The center undertakes practical research on how firms generate business value from digitization. Barbara’s work focuses on how organizations effectively deliver value from their information assets.

Prior to MIT CISR, Barbara was a tenured faculty member at the University of Virginia (UVA) where she taught undergraduate and graduate courses in data management, business analytics, and IT strategy. She is a two-time recipient of the UVA All-University Teaching Award (2002, 2010), which recognizes teaching excellence in professors, particularly those who inspire and motivate students. This honor is especially meaningful to Barbara because she earned her undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia.

Since the mid–90’s, Barbara has deeply explored data warehousing, business intelligence, analytics, big data, and AI. Her research ranges from large-scale surveys and meta-analyses to lab experiments and in-depth case studies. Five of her cases have placed in the Society for Information Management Paper Awards competition: First American Corporation (1999), Owens and Minor (2000), Continental Airlines (2004), Sprint (2008), and BBVA (2018). Barbara is a leading academic scholar, publishing in such journals as Information Systems Research; MIT Sloan Management Review; MIS Quarterly; and MIS Quarterly Executive. She presents her work globally to academic and business audiences.

Barbara serves as associate editor of the Business Intelligence Journal, research fellow of The Data Warehousing Institute, and fellow of the Teradata University Network. In 2017, Barbara was awarded the Teradata University Network Hugh J. Watson Award for her contributions to the data and analytics academic community via the Teradata University Network. She is the author of two leading systems analysis and design textbooks, published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. She is married and blessed with two daughters.


Technology/Innovation Strategy
Sloan Management Review Distinguished Professor of Management
Deputy Dean
Professor, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management
Michael Cusumano
Sloan Management Review Distinguished Professor of Management
Deputy Dean
Professor, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Michael A. Cusumano is the SMR Distinguished Professor of Management and Deputy Dean at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Previously he held a joint appointment in the School of Engineering. Professor Cusumano specializes in strategy, product development, and entrepreneurship in computer software as well as automobiles and consumer electronics. At MIT, he has recently taught Software & Internet Entrepreneurship as well as Advanced Strategic Management. During 2016-17, he was on leave as Special Vice President and Dean of Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the Tokyo University of Science, where he founded the Tokyo Entrepreneurship and Innovation Center and designed a new mid-career Management of Technology curriculum as well as a new business school that merged the Graduate School of Innovation and the School of Management.

Cusumano received a BA degree from Princeton 1976 and a PhD from Harvard in 1984, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Production and Operations Management at the Harvard Business School during 1984-86. He is fluent in Japanese and has lived and worked in Japan for more than eight years, with two Fulbright Fellowships and a Japan Foundation Fellowship for studying at Tokyo University. He has been a Visiting Professor at Imperial College, Tokyo University, Hitotsubashi University, the University of St. Gallen, the University of Maryland, and Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. He has consulted and lectured for approximately 100 organizations, including Alcatel, Amadeus, AOL, ARM, AT&T, BMC Software, Business Objects, Cisco, Ericsson, Fiat, Ford, Fujitsu, GE, Fidelity, Hitachi, Huawei, i2 Technologies, IBM, Intel, Liberty Mutual, Lucent, Microsoft, Motorola, NASA, NEC, Nokia, NTT Data, Philips, Robert Bosch, Schlumberger, Siemens, Texas Instruments, Toyota, Toshiba, and Verizon. He is currently a director of two publicly listed financial services and technology companies: Orix Corporation in Japan and Ferratum Group in Europe. He is a former director of Patni Computer Systems in India (sold in 2011 for $1.2 billion) and Fixstars Corporation, a Japanese developer of high-performance software applications. He was recently a director of Zylotech, a predictive analytics company operating out of Cambridge, MA. He has served as editor-in-chief and chairman of the MIT Sloan Management Review and writes regularly on Technology Strategy and Management for Communications of the ACM. In 2009, he was named one of the most influential people in technology and IT by Silicon.com.

Cusumano has published 14 books and more than 120 articles and columns. His latest book is The Business of Platforms: Strategy in the Age of Digital Competition, Innovation, and Power (2019, with Annabelle Gawer and David Yoffie). His prior book with David Yoffie, Strategy Rules: Five Timeless Lessons from Bill Gates, Andy Grove, and Steve Jobs (2015), has been translated into 18 languages and received wide media coverage from CNBC, Bloomberg News, The New York TimesThe EconomistThe Financial TimesFast Company, and other media outlets. Other books include Staying Power (2010), based on the 2009 Oxford Clarendon Lectures and named one of the top books of 2011 by Strategy + Business magazine; and The Business of Software (2004), also named one of the best books of the year in Strategy + BusinessMicrosoft Secrets (1995, with Richard Selby) sold approximately 150,000 copies in 14 languages. Platform Leadership (2002, with Annabelle Gawer) is often considered the first management book to examine the phenomenon of industry-wide platforms and ecosystem-based competition. Competing on Internet Time: Lessons from Netscape and its Battle with Microsoft (1998, with David Yoffie), was named one of the top 10 business books of 1998 by Business Week, and played a central role in the Microsoft anti-trust trial.


Bold Technologies Enabled by Small Satellites
Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Co-Director, Small Satellite Center
Bisplinghoff Faculty Fellow
Kerri Cahoy
Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Co-Director, Small Satellite Center
Bisplinghoff Faculty Fellow

Kerri Cahoy is an Associate Professor of AeroAstro at MIT. Cahoy received a B.S. in electrical engineering from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA, in 2000, and  M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA, in 2002 and 2008, respectively. Cahoy currently is the Co-Director of the Small Satellite Center, and leads the Space Telecommunications, Astronomy, and Radiation (STAR) Laboratory. Cahoy's research focuses include nanosatellite atmospheric sensing, optical communications, and exoplanet technology demonstration missions.


Teaching Predictive Multiscale Materials Design
McAfee Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Markus Buehler
McAfee Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

Markus J. Buehler is the McAfee Professor of Engineering at MIT and leads MIT’s Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics. His primary research interests focus on the structure and mechanical properties of biological and bio-inspired materials, to characterize, model and create materials with architectural features from the nano- to the macro-scale. Much of his research deals with protein materials – the basic constituent of all life – rendering complex materials such as cells, blood vessels, but also spider silk and viruses. Using an array of theoretical, computational and experimental methods, his work seeks to understand the means by which nature creates materials, with applications in bio-inspired engineering. His most recent book, Biomateriomics, presents a new design paradigm for the analysis of biomaterials using a categorization approach that translates insights from disparate fields.  

Buehler is the recipient of many awards including the Harold E. Edgerton Faculty Achievement Award, the Alfred Noble Prize, the Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology, the Leonardo da Vinci Award, and the Thomas J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award, the United States Air Force Young Investigator Award, the Navy Young Investigator Award, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award, as well as the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). In 2018, Buehler was selected as a Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate Analytics. In 2019, he received the Materials Horizons Outstanding Paper Prize, and his work was recognized as a highly cited author by the Royal Society of Chemistry. A frequent collaborator with artists, he is a member of the MIT Center for Art, Science and Technology (CAST) Executive Committee.


Quantum Computing
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
Professor of Physics
MIT Lincoln Laboratory Fellow
Director, MIT Center for Quantum Engineering (CQE)
Associate Director, MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE)
William Oliver
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
Professor of Physics
MIT Lincoln Laboratory Fellow
Director, MIT Center for Quantum Engineering (CQE)
Associate Director, MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE)

William D. Oliver is a Principal Investigator in the Engineering Quantum Systems Group (MIT campus) and the Quantum Information and Integrated Nanosystems Group (MIT Lincoln Laboratory). He provides programmatic and technical leadership targeting the development of quantum and classical high-performance computing technologies. Will’s research interests include the materials growth, fabrication, design, and measurement of superconducting qubits, as well as the development of cryogenic packaging and control electronics involving cryogenic CMOS and single-flux quantum digital logic. Will is a Fellow of the American Physical Society; serves on the National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee and the US Committee for Superconducting Electronics; is an IEEE Applied Superconductivity Conference (ASC) Board Member; and is a member of IEEE, APS, Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, and Tau Beta Pi.

Will received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the Stanford University, the SM in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT, and a BS in Electrical Engineering and BA in Japanese from the University of Rochester (NY).


AI and drones (TBC)
Bisplinghoff Professor, Aeronautics & Astronautics
Director of Quest Systems Engineering, MIT Quest for Intelligence
Nicholas Roy
Bisplinghoff Professor, Aeronautics & Astronautics
Director of Quest Systems Engineering, MIT Quest for Intelligence

Nicholas Roy is the Bisplinghoff Professor of Aeronautics & Astronautics and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has a B.Sc. in Physics and Cognitive Science an M.Sc. in Computer Science, both from McGill University. He received his Ph. D. in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University in 2003. He has made research contributions to planning under uncertainty, machine learning, human-computer interaction and aerial robotics. He founded and led Project Wing at Google [X] from 2012-2014. He is currently the Director of Quest Systems Engineering in MIT's Quest for Intelligence.

  • Agenda

    Machine Learning and Data Science in Process Automation, Beyond Robotics
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

    Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

    Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.


    How to Maximize Returns from Data Monetization
    Principal Research Scientist,
    Center for Information Systems Research
    Barbara Wixom
    Principal Research Scientist,
    Center for Information Systems Research

    Barbara joined MIT Sloan in June 2013 to serve as a Principal Research Scientist at the MIT Sloan Center for Information Systems Research (CISR). MIT CISR was established in 1974 as a non-profit research group, and it currently is funded by 85 corporate sponsors and patrons. The center undertakes practical research on how firms generate business value from digitization. Barbara’s work focuses on how organizations effectively deliver value from their information assets.

    Prior to MIT CISR, Barbara was a tenured faculty member at the University of Virginia (UVA) where she taught undergraduate and graduate courses in data management, business analytics, and IT strategy. She is a two-time recipient of the UVA All-University Teaching Award (2002, 2010), which recognizes teaching excellence in professors, particularly those who inspire and motivate students. This honor is especially meaningful to Barbara because she earned her undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia.

    Since the mid–90’s, Barbara has deeply explored data warehousing, business intelligence, analytics, big data, and AI. Her research ranges from large-scale surveys and meta-analyses to lab experiments and in-depth case studies. Five of her cases have placed in the Society for Information Management Paper Awards competition: First American Corporation (1999), Owens and Minor (2000), Continental Airlines (2004), Sprint (2008), and BBVA (2018). Barbara is a leading academic scholar, publishing in such journals as Information Systems Research; MIT Sloan Management Review; MIS Quarterly; and MIS Quarterly Executive. She presents her work globally to academic and business audiences.

    Barbara serves as associate editor of the Business Intelligence Journal, research fellow of The Data Warehousing Institute, and fellow of the Teradata University Network. In 2017, Barbara was awarded the Teradata University Network Hugh J. Watson Award for her contributions to the data and analytics academic community via the Teradata University Network. She is the author of two leading systems analysis and design textbooks, published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. She is married and blessed with two daughters.


    Technology/Innovation Strategy
    Sloan Management Review Distinguished Professor of Management
    Deputy Dean
    Professor, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management
    Michael Cusumano
    Sloan Management Review Distinguished Professor of Management
    Deputy Dean
    Professor, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

    Michael A. Cusumano is the SMR Distinguished Professor of Management and Deputy Dean at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Previously he held a joint appointment in the School of Engineering. Professor Cusumano specializes in strategy, product development, and entrepreneurship in computer software as well as automobiles and consumer electronics. At MIT, he has recently taught Software & Internet Entrepreneurship as well as Advanced Strategic Management. During 2016-17, he was on leave as Special Vice President and Dean of Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the Tokyo University of Science, where he founded the Tokyo Entrepreneurship and Innovation Center and designed a new mid-career Management of Technology curriculum as well as a new business school that merged the Graduate School of Innovation and the School of Management.

    Cusumano received a BA degree from Princeton 1976 and a PhD from Harvard in 1984, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Production and Operations Management at the Harvard Business School during 1984-86. He is fluent in Japanese and has lived and worked in Japan for more than eight years, with two Fulbright Fellowships and a Japan Foundation Fellowship for studying at Tokyo University. He has been a Visiting Professor at Imperial College, Tokyo University, Hitotsubashi University, the University of St. Gallen, the University of Maryland, and Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. He has consulted and lectured for approximately 100 organizations, including Alcatel, Amadeus, AOL, ARM, AT&T, BMC Software, Business Objects, Cisco, Ericsson, Fiat, Ford, Fujitsu, GE, Fidelity, Hitachi, Huawei, i2 Technologies, IBM, Intel, Liberty Mutual, Lucent, Microsoft, Motorola, NASA, NEC, Nokia, NTT Data, Philips, Robert Bosch, Schlumberger, Siemens, Texas Instruments, Toyota, Toshiba, and Verizon. He is currently a director of two publicly listed financial services and technology companies: Orix Corporation in Japan and Ferratum Group in Europe. He is a former director of Patni Computer Systems in India (sold in 2011 for $1.2 billion) and Fixstars Corporation, a Japanese developer of high-performance software applications. He was recently a director of Zylotech, a predictive analytics company operating out of Cambridge, MA. He has served as editor-in-chief and chairman of the MIT Sloan Management Review and writes regularly on Technology Strategy and Management for Communications of the ACM. In 2009, he was named one of the most influential people in technology and IT by Silicon.com.

    Cusumano has published 14 books and more than 120 articles and columns. His latest book is The Business of Platforms: Strategy in the Age of Digital Competition, Innovation, and Power (2019, with Annabelle Gawer and David Yoffie). His prior book with David Yoffie, Strategy Rules: Five Timeless Lessons from Bill Gates, Andy Grove, and Steve Jobs (2015), has been translated into 18 languages and received wide media coverage from CNBC, Bloomberg News, The New York TimesThe EconomistThe Financial TimesFast Company, and other media outlets. Other books include Staying Power (2010), based on the 2009 Oxford Clarendon Lectures and named one of the top books of 2011 by Strategy + Business magazine; and The Business of Software (2004), also named one of the best books of the year in Strategy + BusinessMicrosoft Secrets (1995, with Richard Selby) sold approximately 150,000 copies in 14 languages. Platform Leadership (2002, with Annabelle Gawer) is often considered the first management book to examine the phenomenon of industry-wide platforms and ecosystem-based competition. Competing on Internet Time: Lessons from Netscape and its Battle with Microsoft (1998, with David Yoffie), was named one of the top 10 business books of 1998 by Business Week, and played a central role in the Microsoft anti-trust trial.


    Bold Technologies Enabled by Small Satellites
    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics
    Co-Director, Small Satellite Center
    Bisplinghoff Faculty Fellow
    Kerri Cahoy
    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics
    Co-Director, Small Satellite Center
    Bisplinghoff Faculty Fellow

    Kerri Cahoy is an Associate Professor of AeroAstro at MIT. Cahoy received a B.S. in electrical engineering from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA, in 2000, and  M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA, in 2002 and 2008, respectively. Cahoy currently is the Co-Director of the Small Satellite Center, and leads the Space Telecommunications, Astronomy, and Radiation (STAR) Laboratory. Cahoy's research focuses include nanosatellite atmospheric sensing, optical communications, and exoplanet technology demonstration missions.


    Teaching Predictive Multiscale Materials Design
    McAfee Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Markus Buehler
    McAfee Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Markus J. Buehler is the McAfee Professor of Engineering at MIT and leads MIT’s Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics. His primary research interests focus on the structure and mechanical properties of biological and bio-inspired materials, to characterize, model and create materials with architectural features from the nano- to the macro-scale. Much of his research deals with protein materials – the basic constituent of all life – rendering complex materials such as cells, blood vessels, but also spider silk and viruses. Using an array of theoretical, computational and experimental methods, his work seeks to understand the means by which nature creates materials, with applications in bio-inspired engineering. His most recent book, Biomateriomics, presents a new design paradigm for the analysis of biomaterials using a categorization approach that translates insights from disparate fields.  

    Buehler is the recipient of many awards including the Harold E. Edgerton Faculty Achievement Award, the Alfred Noble Prize, the Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology, the Leonardo da Vinci Award, and the Thomas J.R. Hughes Young Investigator Award. He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award, the United States Air Force Young Investigator Award, the Navy Young Investigator Award, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award, as well as the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). In 2018, Buehler was selected as a Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate Analytics. In 2019, he received the Materials Horizons Outstanding Paper Prize, and his work was recognized as a highly cited author by the Royal Society of Chemistry. A frequent collaborator with artists, he is a member of the MIT Center for Art, Science and Technology (CAST) Executive Committee.


    Quantum Computing
    Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
    Professor of Physics
    MIT Lincoln Laboratory Fellow
    Director, MIT Center for Quantum Engineering (CQE)
    Associate Director, MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE)
    William Oliver
    Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
    Professor of Physics
    MIT Lincoln Laboratory Fellow
    Director, MIT Center for Quantum Engineering (CQE)
    Associate Director, MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE)

    William D. Oliver is a Principal Investigator in the Engineering Quantum Systems Group (MIT campus) and the Quantum Information and Integrated Nanosystems Group (MIT Lincoln Laboratory). He provides programmatic and technical leadership targeting the development of quantum and classical high-performance computing technologies. Will’s research interests include the materials growth, fabrication, design, and measurement of superconducting qubits, as well as the development of cryogenic packaging and control electronics involving cryogenic CMOS and single-flux quantum digital logic. Will is a Fellow of the American Physical Society; serves on the National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee and the US Committee for Superconducting Electronics; is an IEEE Applied Superconductivity Conference (ASC) Board Member; and is a member of IEEE, APS, Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, and Tau Beta Pi.

    Will received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the Stanford University, the SM in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT, and a BS in Electrical Engineering and BA in Japanese from the University of Rochester (NY).


    AI and drones (TBC)
    Bisplinghoff Professor, Aeronautics & Astronautics
    Director of Quest Systems Engineering, MIT Quest for Intelligence
    Nicholas Roy
    Bisplinghoff Professor, Aeronautics & Astronautics
    Director of Quest Systems Engineering, MIT Quest for Intelligence

    Nicholas Roy is the Bisplinghoff Professor of Aeronautics & Astronautics and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has a B.Sc. in Physics and Cognitive Science an M.Sc. in Computer Science, both from McGill University. He received his Ph. D. in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University in 2003. He has made research contributions to planning under uncertainty, machine learning, human-computer interaction and aerial robotics. He founded and led Project Wing at Google [X] from 2012-2014. He is currently the Director of Quest Systems Engineering in MIT's Quest for Intelligence.