Past Event

2020 MIT SENSE.nano Symposium: The Body at All Scales (Sept. 21, 22, 29)

September 29, 2020
2020 MIT SENSE.nano Symposium: The Body at All Scales (Sept. 21, 22, 29)
Webinar

Location

Zoom Webinar

Overview

Join us at the 2020 SENSE.nano Symposium, three half-day webinars on September 21, 22, and 29 to explore sensing the body at all scales.

From the level of cells, organs, and body systems to individuals and populations, this symposium, broken into three half-day webinars, will highlight the needs for new SENSE technologies, showcase research and innovations, and present the impact of these technologies. Over a series of invited technical talks, presentations by MIT-launched startups, student videos, and panel discussions, we will provide needs context and solution perspectives in the domains of sensing for the study of biology and for the care of humans in their natural environment.

Note: This agenda will be updated as we add additional details.

  • Overview

    Join us at the 2020 SENSE.nano Symposium, three half-day webinars on September 21, 22, and 29 to explore sensing the body at all scales.

    From the level of cells, organs, and body systems to individuals and populations, this symposium, broken into three half-day webinars, will highlight the needs for new SENSE technologies, showcase research and innovations, and present the impact of these technologies. Over a series of invited technical talks, presentations by MIT-launched startups, student videos, and panel discussions, we will provide needs context and solution perspectives in the domains of sensing for the study of biology and for the care of humans in their natural environment.

    Note: This agenda will be updated as we add additional details.


Agenda

  • Day 1 - Monday, September 21, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM

    Welcome and Keynote

    1:00 PM
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

    Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

    Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow
    Vladimir Bulovic
    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow

    Vladimir Bulović is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding the Fariborz Maseeh Chair in Emerging Technology.  He directs the Organic and Nanostructured Electronics Laboratory, co-leads the MIT-Eni Solar Frontiers Center, leads the Tata GridEdge program, and is the Founding Director of MIT.nano, MIT's new 200,000 sqft nano-fabrication, nano-characterization, and prototyping facility. He is an author of over 250 research articles (cited over 50,000 times and recognized as the top 1% of the most highly cited in the Web of Science). He is an inventor of over 100 U.S. patents in areas of light emitting diodes, lasers, photovoltaics, photodetectors, chemical sensors, programmable memories, and micro-electro machines, majority of which have been licensed and utilized by both start-up and multinational companies.  The three start-up companies Bulović co-founded jointly employ over 350 people, and include Ubiquitous Energy, Inc., developing nanostructured solar technologies, Kateeva, Inc., focused on development of printed electronics, and QD Vision, Inc. (acquired in 2016) that produced quantum dot optoelectronic components.  Products of these companies have been used by millions.  Bulović was the first Associate Dean for Innovation of the School of Engineering and the Inaugural co-Director of MIT’s Innovation Initiative, which he co-led from 2013 to 2018. For his passion for teaching Bulović has been recognized with the MacVicar Fellowship, MIT’s highest teaching honor.  He completed his Electrical Engineering B.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees at Princeton University.

    1:10 PM
    Director, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, MIT
    Elazer Edelman
    Director, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, MIT

    Professor Elazer Edelman is the Director of MIT’s Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES) and holds tenured faculty appointments in the Department of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and in the Division of Health Sciences and Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the Director of the Harvard-MIT Biomedical Engineering Center and of MIT’s Clinical Research Center, and the current occupant of the Edward J. Poitras Chair at MIT.

    Elazer Edelman received Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an M.D. degree with distinction from Harvard Medical School, and then his Ph.D. in Medical Engineering and Medical Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, and in Cardiovascular Medicine, and currently serves as one of the Core Attending Physicians in the acute coronary care unit at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital of the Harvard Medical School.

    His research interests combine his scientific and medical training. His laboratory has earned international recognition in investigation, diagnosis, and treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. He and his laboratory have pioneered basic findings in vascular biology and the development and assessment of biotechnology, especially at the interface of tissues, devices, and materials and, in particular, imaging in cardiovascular disease and fusion imaging. Most recently, he and his students have focused on machine learning and artificial intelligence in the diagnosis and prognostication of critical diseases like aortic stenosis.

    Dr. Edelman also directs the Harvard-MIT Biomedical Engineering Center, dedicated to applying the rigors of the physical sciences to elucidate fundamental biologic processes and mechanisms of disease. Many of his findings are now in clinical trial validation. Almost 350 students and postdoctoral fellows have passed through Dr. Edelman's laboratory, enabling publications of numerous papers and patents. He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, Association of University Cardiologists, American Society of Clinical Investigation, American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Medicine and National Academy of Engineering, and National Academy of Inventors. As Chief Scientific Advisor of Science: Translational Medicine, he has set the tone for the national debate on translational research and innovation.

    (Elazer Edelman video time stamp starts at: 9:46)

    We live in a remarkable time – survival from the most fatal and morbid diseases have dropped precipitously concomitant with extraordinary burgeoning of novel biological insights and the introduction of new technology. Technology and science march hand in hand to improve health. Yet, the onset of this newest viral pandemic has created another global crisis. MIT NANO and IMES through its CRC have long come together to use and advance technology to address issues in human health and disease. Together we sense the world around us at multiple dimensions to quantify our environment and anticipate how to influence our world for good. This talk will provide a view as to the power of multiscale investigations and the impact of such collaborations on established and emerging diseases.

    1:40 PM

    (Video time stamp starts at: 51.35)

    Session 1: Cell and Subcell

    1:45 PM

    Session Introduction
    1:50 PM
    Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
    Ashwin Gopinath
    Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering

    Ashwin Gopinath joined MIT in January 2019 as an assistant professor in Mechanical Engineering where his lab is working on projects at the intersection of molecular self-assembly, surface-chemistry, CMOS nanofabrication, and synthetic biology. Dr. Gopinath earned his PhD in electrical engineering from Boston University for his work on understanding light transport in disordered media. Subsequently, he was a senior research scientist at Caltech and then a research scientist at Google [X]. Dr. Gopinath has co-authored 21 papers in journals including Nature, Science and PNAS as well as received several awards, most recent of which is the 2017 Robert Dirk Prize in Molecular Programming for his seminal contributions in merging DNA nanotechnology with conventional semiconductor nanofabrication.

    (Ashwin Gopinath video time stamp starts at: 57.22)

    Arrays of individual molecules or nanoparticles can combine the advantage of microarrays and single-molecule experiments. They facilitate miniaturized high-throughput assays with low sample and reagent consumption while also revealing heterogeniety hidden in ensemble measurements. However, creating single molecule arrays are particularly difficult since conventional nano-fabrication techniques can't be used to organize individual molecules onto defined positions on a substrate. In this context 'DNA origami placement' is an appealing technique as it allows any molecule (or nanoparticle) that can be labeled with DNA to be organized on arbitrary substrates using standard lithographic processes. The challenge now becomes one of reducing cost, developing applications, and increasing the capabilities.

    In this talk, Gopinath will introduce a bench-top technique to create cm-scale DNA origami nanoarrays that does not require any nanopatterning step, at a cost of $1 per cm2 and Gopinath will also discuss the application of this technique for point-of-care diagnostics. Finally, Gopinath will end by introducing strategies for performing non-aqueous organic reaction on immobilized DNA origami for creating arrays of extremely hydrophobic molecules.

    2:05 PM
    Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Biological Engineering
    Peter So
    Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Biological Engineering

    Peter So is a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Biological Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Prior to joining MIT, Professor So obtained his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1992 and subsequently worked as a postdoctoral associate in the Laboratory for Fluorescence Dynamics at the University of Illinois in Urban-Champaign.  His research focuses on developing high resolution and high information content microscopic imaging instruments.  These instruments are applied in biomedical studies such as the non-invasive optical biopsy of cancer, the mechanotransduction processes in cardiovascular diseases, and the effects of neuronal remodeling on memory plasticity.  Peter So is currently the Director of the MIT Laser Biomedical Research Center, an NIH NIBIB P41 research resource. 

    (Peter So video time stamp starts at: 71.11)

    Quantitative interferometric microscopy is a power non-invasive technique to extract quantitative cellular biomechanical and morphological information. On one hand, we will describe several generations of quantitative interferometric microscopic systems with improved spectral contrast, depth resolution, and enhanced sensitivity. In conjunction with these advances in optical imaging techniques, important biomedical applications have become possible including the identification of biophysical markers of sickle red blood cells and the study of cancer cell nuclear mechanics in relationship to their metastasis potential.

    2:20 PM
    John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry
    Swager
    Timothy Swager
    John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry

    Timothy M. Swager is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry the Department of Chemistry at MIT and the Faculty Director of the Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation. In this latter role, Professor Swager works with the Center’s Executive Director to define the Center’s strategy for fostering innovation, assists with the commercialization of MIT technologies, and plays a key role in the grant selection process. Professor Swager also serves as the Center’s liaison to the MIT academic community, and senior leadership, sitting on faculty and academic committees. Following Professor Swager’s postdoctoral appointment at MIT, he joined the chemistry faculty at the University of Pennsylvania, returning to MIT in 1996 as a Professor of Chemistry, and served as the Head of Chemistry from 2005-2010. Professor Swager’s research interests are in design, synthesis, and study of organic-based electronic, sensory, high-strength and liquid crystalline materials. He has published more than 400 peer-reviewed papers and more than 80 issued/pending patents. Professor Swager is the founder of four companies (DyNuPol, Iptyx, PolyJoule, and C2Sense) and has served on a number of corporate and government boards.He received a B.S. from Montana State University in 1983 and a Ph.D., from the California Institute of Technology in 1988.

    (Timothy Swager video time stamp starts at: 86.35)

    This lecture will focus on the design of systems wherein reconfiguration of complex liquid emulsions (droplets) can be triggered chemically or biochemically. The utility of these methods is to generate new transduction mechanisms by which chemical and biological sensors can be developed. Complex liquid droplets behave as optical lens systems and small changes in surface tensions can change focal lengths or cause systems to switch between optically transmissive or scattering states. Central to this scheme is that the fluids in the droplets have different densities and hence are aligned by the earth’s gravity. The induced optical changes can be triggered with chemical, photochemical, or biochemical stimuli and thereby create new generations of sensors. Demonstrations of these methods for the detection of proteins, antibodies, and pathogens will be presented.   

    2:35 PM

    (Panel Q&A  video time stamp starts at: 103.57)

    Session 2: Organs

    3:15 PM

    Session Introduction
    3:20 PM

    Modulation of Neural Function with Electronic, Optical, and Magnetic Tools
    Class of 1942 Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
    Polina Anikeeva
    Class of 1942 Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering

    Polina Anikeeva received her BS in physics from St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University in 2003. After graduation, she spent a year at the Los Alamos National Lab working on quantum dot photovoltaic cells. She then enrolled in a PhD program in materials science at MIT and graduated in January 2009 with her thesis dedicated to the design of light-emitting devices based on organic materials and nanoparticles. She completed her postdoctoral training at Stanford, where she created devices for optical stimulation and recording from neural circuits.

    In 2011, Polina joined the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT, where she is now an Associate Professor. Her lab focuses on the development of flexible and minimally invasive materials and devices for neural recording, stimulation, and repair. Polina is a recipient of NSF CAREER Award, DARPA Young Faculty Award, the TR35, and 2018 Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise among other honors.  

    To understand the function and dynamics of the nervous system, and to find treatments for the neurological and psychiatric conditions that increasingly affect our aging society, new tools capable of addressing neuronal signaling complexity are urgently needed. These tools must also match the mechanical and chemical properties of the neural tissue to avoid foreign body response and functional perturbation to local circuits. By leveraging fiber-drawing methods from the telecommunications industry, our group creates flexible and stretchable probes capable of recording and stimulation of neural activity as well as delivery of drugs and genes into the brain and spinal cord. We use these probes to interrogate brain circuits, such as those involved in anxiety and fear, and to promote recovery following spinal cord and nerve injury. Simultaneosly, we develop a broad range of magnetic nanotransducers that convert externally applied magnetic fields into thermal, chemical, and mechanical signals, which can then be perceived by ion channels on neurons. Since biological tissues exhibit negligible magnetic permeability and low conductivity, magnetic fields can penetrate deep into the body with no attenuation, allowing us to apply the nanomagnetic transducers to remotely control deep brain circuits associated with reward and motivation, as well as adrenal circuits involved in regulation of corticosterone and (nor)epinephrine release.

    3:35 PM
    Postdoctoral Associate, Computational Instrumentation Lab at Mechanical Engineering
    Xiang (Shawn) Zhang
    Postdoctoral Associate, Computational Instrumentation Lab at Mechanical Engineering

    Xiang (Shawn) Zhang is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Computational Instrumentation Lab advised by Dr. Brian Anthony. Shawn’s research focuses on non-contact laser ultrasound and design of novel systems to enhance/extend ultrasound beyond present capabilities. Shawn completed his Ph.D. and Master’s at MIT in Mechanical Engineering with research focusing on non-contact ultrasound, including laser ultrasound and ultrasound tomography. Shawn received his undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland-College Park (UMCP); during which he completed a co-op at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) designing the Watt Balance to redefine the SI kilogram. Outside of research, Shawn was a mentor at MIT MakerWorkshop and a team lead for MIT Hyperloop.

    (Xiang (Shawn) Zhang  video time stamp starts at: 23.19)

    Full non-contact laser ultrasound (LUS) imaging has several distinct advantages over current medical ultrasound (US) technologies: elimination of coupling mediums (gel/water), operator-independent image quality, improved repeatability, and volumetric imaging. Current light-based ultrasound utilizing tissue penetrating photoacoustics (PA) generally uses traditional piezoelectric transducers in contact with the imaged tissue or carries an optical fiber detector close to the imaging site. Unlike PA, LUS minimizes optical penetration and specifically restricts optical to acoustic energy transduction at the tissue surface, maximizing the generated acoustic source amplitude. LUS operates analogous to conventional ultrasound by using light to replace piezoelectric elements. Experimental LUS images at ~5 cm image depths with meter scale standoff successfully demonstrates the feasibility of LUS for human imaging at eye and skin safe optical exposure levels. First human LUS images inspire further LUS development and is a significant step toward clinical implementation of LUS.

    3:50 PM
    Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
    Jacob K. White
    Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    Professor White has been a faculty member at MIT since 1987, is currently the C.H. Green Professor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and recently became a MacVicar Faculty Fellow. His research area is in numerical algorithms and software for engineering design, and his current focus is on using novel combinations of computation and commodity hardware to develop medical and educational technology with minimal economic barriers. 

    (Jacob White video time stamp starts at: 38.36)

    The costs and complex infrastructure for high-field (> 1.5 Tesla) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has relegated this extremely-safe and remarkably-revealing clinical tool to high-end hospital care. Recently-developed low-field MR imagers (0.05 to 0.2 Tesla) are changing this situation, because they can accurately image an adult brain, yet are portable enough to wheel to an ICU or NICU.

    In this talk, White will discuss his group’s nascent effort to go even further—an imager that a clinician could slide over an arm (or a leg, or an infant's head), and "see beneath the skin" in real time. White will start by describing the techniques used in their $100, student-assembleable, finger-sized imager, and then discuss the daunting challenges in moving beyond their very small educational device.

    4:05 PM

    (Panel Q&A video time stamp starts at: 55.03)

    4:25 PM

    Peek into research
    4:30 PM

    Closing remarks
  • Day 2 - Tuesday, September 22, 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM

    Welcome and Keynote

    1:00 PM
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

    Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

    Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow
    Vladimir Bulovic
    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow

    Vladimir Bulović is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding the Fariborz Maseeh Chair in Emerging Technology.  He directs the Organic and Nanostructured Electronics Laboratory, co-leads the MIT-Eni Solar Frontiers Center, leads the Tata GridEdge program, and is the Founding Director of MIT.nano, MIT's new 200,000 sqft nano-fabrication, nano-characterization, and prototyping facility. He is an author of over 250 research articles (cited over 50,000 times and recognized as the top 1% of the most highly cited in the Web of Science). He is an inventor of over 100 U.S. patents in areas of light emitting diodes, lasers, photovoltaics, photodetectors, chemical sensors, programmable memories, and micro-electro machines, majority of which have been licensed and utilized by both start-up and multinational companies.  The three start-up companies Bulović co-founded jointly employ over 350 people, and include Ubiquitous Energy, Inc., developing nanostructured solar technologies, Kateeva, Inc., focused on development of printed electronics, and QD Vision, Inc. (acquired in 2016) that produced quantum dot optoelectronic components.  Products of these companies have been used by millions.  Bulović was the first Associate Dean for Innovation of the School of Engineering and the Inaugural co-Director of MIT’s Innovation Initiative, which he co-led from 2013 to 2018. For his passion for teaching Bulović has been recognized with the MacVicar Fellowship, MIT’s highest teaching honor.  He completed his Electrical Engineering B.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees at Princeton University.

    1:10 PM
    Director, Digital Healthcare Group at Analog Devices
    Brendan Cronin
    Director, Digital Healthcare Group at Analog Devices

    Brendan graduated with a degree in Micro-Electronic Engineering from University College Cork, Ireland in 1998 and immediately started work with Analog Devices as a design engineer working on Integrated Circuits in deep submicron CMOS. In 2005, he joined the newly formed Automotive group and helped define and drive the group’s Powertrain strategy with a specific focus on non-contact sensors. In 2014, he joined the Healthcare Business Unit as Marketing and System Applications Director and helped shape the company’s vision and strategy for Digital Health and related applications. In 2019, he was asked to lead a new strategic initiative focused on ‘Biosensors’ within the Digital Healthcare BU and today lead’s a cross-functional team focused on solving the industry’s toughest problems in Point-Of-Care Diagnostics, Synthetic Biology and Advanced Therapeutics. Brendan resides in Boston, MA with his wife and family.

    (Brendan Cronin video time stamp starts at 6.21)

    The growing diversity and complexity of healthcare systems brings with it a support challenge for clinicians and Medtech companies alike. This is particularly true within the emerging Digital Healthcare market, where the number of applications is growing rapidly, and the ecosystems are typically large and complex. Understanding these systems and aligning key sensor and interface technology is critical to driving growth in both existing and emerging applications. This talk will provide insight into ADI’s Healthcare business and share details on our version of Digital Health. Examples of new applications will be analyzed, focusing on key challenges and relevant sensor technology (e.g. nano-sensors for rapid point-of-care diagnostics and monitoring for disease management, smart sensor systems for synthetic biology, etc.). The talk will conclude with a discussion on future needs and initiatives needed to drive further adoption of digital health solutions.

    1:35 PM

    (Video time stamp starts at 35.50)

    Session 3: Body Systems

    1:40 PM

    Session Introduction
    1:45 PM

    Rapid Antigen Diagnostics for Emerging Pathogens
    Hermann L.F. von Helmholtz Professor of Health Sciences
    Lee Gehrke
    Hermann L.F. von Helmholtz Professor of Health Sciences

    Lee Gehrke is Hermann L.F. von Helmholtz Professor of Health Sciences at MIT and Professor of Microbiology at Harvard Medical School.  His laboratory studies host-pathogen interactions in virus infections, in addition to developing rapid antigen diagnostics for human viral infections, including dengue virus, Zika virus, Chikungunya virus, and SARS-CoV-2. The goal of the rapid test development is to design rapid, inexpensive, easy to use tests that can be scaled for use anywhere in the world without need for power, special chemicals, or special training.

    A large number of animal species are hosts to viruses in geographic areas that have historically beenseparated from humans. With climate change, deforestation, and increased urbanization, what was once rare human contact with these pathogens is increasing, leading to spillover events that cause emerging virus infections. Rapid diagnostic tests are needed for population surveillance to identify circulating pathogens, as well as to serve health care workers in detecting and distinguishing pathogens for optimal patient care. The goal of our work is to develop low cost tests that are simple to use, do not require power, and do not require special chemicals. In COVID19 disease, the absence of a vaccine means that active vigilance, accomplished by regular testing (every 2-3 days) is required to prevent superspreader transmission. This regular testing requires an inexpensive test that can be used as a point-of-care diagnostic. We are actively pursuing technologies to reduce the cost of developing rapid antigen tests, permitting advance diagnostics development that precedes outbreaks and epidemics.

    2:00 PM
    Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
    Giovanni Traverso
    Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering

    Giovanni Traverso is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and also a gastroenterologist in the Division of Gastroenterology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), Harvard Medical School. Dr. Traverso grew up in Peru, Canada and the United Kingdom.  He received his BA from Trinity College, University of Cambridge, UK, and his PhD from the lab of Prof. Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins University.  He subsequently completed medical school at the University of Cambridge, internal medicine residency at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and his gastroenterology fellowship training at Massachusetts General Hospital, both at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Traverso’s previous work focused on the development of novel molecular tests for the early detection of colon cancer. For his post-doctoral research, he transitioned to the fields of chemical and biomedical engineering in the laboratory of Professor Robert Langer at MIT where he developed a series of novel technologies for drug delivery as well as physiological sensing via the gastrointestinal tract.

    His current research program is focused on developing the next generation of drug delivery systems to enable safe and efficient delivery of therapeutics as well developing novel ingestible electronic devices for sensing a broad array of physiologic and pathophysiologic parameters. Additionally, Dr. Traverso continues his efforts towards the development of novel diagnostic tests that enable the early detection of cancer.

    (Giovanni Traverso video time stamp starts at 57.10)

    Medication non-adherence (non-compliance) represents a major barrier to effective clinical care. In developed nations, only 50% of patients take their medications as prescribed, manifesting in more than $100 billion in avoidable hospitalizations every year in the United States alone, and the numbers are far worse in the developing world. In his talk, Dr. Traverso will present a series of novel technologies being developed with the goal to enhance and facilitate medication administration. Specifically, Dr. Traverso will discuss the development of new technologies for the delivery of macromolecules through the oral route.

    2:15 PM
    LG Career Development Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at MIT Media Lab
    Canan Dagdeviren
    LG Career Development Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at MIT Media Lab

    Canan Dagdeviren is the LG Career Development Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at MIT Media Lab, where she leads the Conformable Decoders research group. The group aims to convert the patterns of nature and the human body into beneficial signals and energy.

    Dagdeviren earned her Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she focused on exploring patterning techniques and creating piezoelectric biomedical systems. Her collective Ph.D. research involved flexible mechanical energy harvesters, multi-functional cardiac vessel stents, wearable blood pressure sensors, and stretchable skin modulus sensing bio-patches.

    https://www.media.mit.edu/people/canand/overview/

    (Canan Dagdeviren video time stamp starts at 111.33)

    The rapid advancement of electronic devices and fabrication technologies has further promoted the field of wearables and smart textiles. However, most of the current efforts in textile electronics focus on a single modality and cover a small area. In this work, we introduce a new platform of modular, conformable (i.e., flexible and stretchable) distributed sensor networks that can be embedded into digitally-knit textiles. This platform can be customized for various forms, sizes, and functions using standard, accessible, and high-throughput textile manufacturing and garment patterning techniques. Here, we have developed a tailored, electronic textile conformable suit (E-TeCS) to perform large-scale, multi-modal physiological (temperature, heart rate, and respiration) sensing in vivo.

    2:30 PM
    David H. Koch Professor of Engineering, MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research
    Michael Cima
    David H. Koch Professor of Engineering, MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

    Dr. Michael J. Cima is the David H. Koch Professor of Engineering and a Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has an appointment at the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. He earned a B.S. in chemistry in 1982 (phi beta kappa) and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering in 1986, both from the University of California at Berkeley. Prof. Cima joined the MIT faculty in 1986 as an Assistant Professor. He was promoted to full Professor in 1995. He was elected a Fellow of the American Ceramics Society in 1997. Prof. Cima was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2011. He now holds the David H. Koch Chair of Engineering at MIT. He was appointed faculty director of the Lemelson-MIT Program in 2009 which is a program to inspire youth to be inventive and has a nationwide reach. In 2018, Cima was named a co-director of MIT's Innovation Initiative and the associate dean of innovation for the School of Engineering.

    Prof. Cima is author or co-author of over two hundred peer reviewed scientific publications, thirty seven US patents, and is a recognized expert in the field of materials processing. Prof. Cima is actively involved in materials and engineered systems for improvement in human health such as treatments for cancer, metabolic diseases, trauma, and urological disorders. Prof. Cima's research concerns advanced forming technology such as for complex macro and micro devices, colloid science, MEMS and other micro components for medical devices that are used for drug delivery and diagnostics, high-throughput development methods for formulations of materials and pharmaceutical formulations. He is a coinventor of MIT’s three dimensional printing process. His research has led to the development of chemically derived epitaxial oxide films for HTSC coated conductors. He and collaborators are developing implantable MEMS devices for unprecedented control in the delivery of pharmaceuticals and implantable diagnostic systems. Finally, through his consulting work he has been a major contributor to the development of high throughput systems for discovery of novel crystal forms and formulations of pharmaceuticals.

    Prof. Cima also has extensive entrepreneurial experience. He is co-founder of MicroChips Inc., a developer of microelectronic based drug delivery and diagnostic systems. Prof. Cima took two sabbaticals to act as senior consultant and management team member at Transform Pharmaceuticals Inc. a company that he helped start and that was ultimately acquired by Johnson and Johnson Corporation. He is a co-founder and director at T2 Biosystems a medical diagnostics company. Most recently, Prof. Cima co-founded SpringLeaf Therapeutics a specialty pharmaceutical company and Taris Biomedical a urology products company.

    (Michael Cima video time stamp starts at 127.45)

    We recently discovered in a human clinical trial that the MR signal originating from skeletal muscle is an absolute measure of excess volume in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). HD patients are prescribed a volume of fluid to be removed by ultrafiltration during their dialysis session based on an assumed “dry weight”. Current real-time assessment measures include hematocrit with the objective of keeping it constant. The vascular volume is maintained during dialysis using this technology. Hematocrit does not, however, provide a measure of how close the patient is to his/her dry weight. Clinical signs and symptoms are used to identify hypovolemia due to excessive fluid withdrawal. These non-specific indicators often lag behind the onset of hypovolemia and their presentation is highly variable between patients. Excessive fluid removal during HD is associated with nausea, vomiting, cramping, and chest pain. We have constructed a sensor that will measure the tissue relaxivity of muscle without the need for an MRI. This bedside instrument is portable and compatible with the dialysis suite. Our goal is to improve management of ESRD patient during HD and ultimately improve outcomes.

    2:45 PM

    (Panel Q&A video time stamp starts at 144.30)

    Session 4: Populations

    3:15 PM

    Session Introduction
    3:20 PM
    Senior Staff, Human Health and Performance Systems Group, Lincoln Laboratory
    Thomas F. Quatieri
    Senior Staff, Human Health and Performance Systems Group, Lincoln Laboratory

    Thomas F. Quatieri received his B.S. degree (summa cum laude) from Tufts University in Medford, MA, and S.M., E.E., and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, MA. He is a senior member of the technical staff with MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, focused on speech and auditory signal processing and neuro-biophysical modeling with application to detection and monitoring of neurological, neurotraumatic, and stress conditions.

    Dr. Quatieri holds a faculty appointment in the Harvard-MIT Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology Program. He is an author on more than 200 publications, holds 12 patents, and authored the textbook Discrete-Time Speech Signal Processing: Principles and Practice. He is a recipient of four IEEE Transactions Best Paper Awards and the 2010 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Best Paper Award. He led the Lincoln Laboratory team that won the 2013 and 2014 AVEC Depression Challenges and the 2015 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Team Award for their work on vocal and facial biomarkers. He served on many IEEE technical committees and the IEEE James L. Flanagan Speech and Audio Awards Committee. He has also served on the editorial board of the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, and is currently an associate editor of Computer, Speech, and Language. He co-led the mHealth group on Monitoring COVID Patients and Clinical Personnel under the Mass General Brigham Center for COVID Innovation. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and a member of Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, Sigma Xi, ICSA, and ASA.

    (Thomas Quatieri  video time stamp starts at 6.16)

    A framework is proposed to detect and track COVID-19 based on changes in neuromotor coordination across speech subsystems involved in respiration, phonation, and articulation. The approach is motivated by evidence of widespread inflammation of COVID-19 throughout the body including lower (i.e., bronchial tubes, diaphragm, lower trachea) and upper (i.e., laryngeal, pharyngeal, oral and nasal) tract injury, as well as by the growing evidence of the virus’ neurological impact. An exploratory study is described involving a small set of pre-COVID-19 (pre-exposure) versus post-COVID-19 (after positive diagnosis but presumed asymptomatic) audio interviews and a larger cohort of control versus post-COVID-19 participants in an online protocol designed by Voca.ai in collaboration with Carnegie Melon University.

    For each cohort pair, Cohen’s d effect sizes were measured using coordination of respiration (as measured through the acoustic speech envelope) and laryngeal motion (fundamental frequency and cepstral peak prominence), and coordination of laryngeal and articulatory (formant center frequencies) motion. While there is a strong subject-dependence, group-level morphology of effect sizes indicates a reduced complexity of subsystem coordination. For the later (larger) cohort, an encouraging detection/false alarm tradeoff was estimated using a Gaussian mixture-based classifier. Validation is needed with larger more controlled datasets and addressing confounding influences such as different recording conditions, unbalanced data quantities, and changes in underlying vocal status from pre-to-post time recordings including changes in emotional state.

    3:35 PM

    Senseable Cities
    Director, MIT Senseable City Lab
    Carlo Ratti
    Director, MIT Senseable City Lab

    An architect and engineer by training, Professor Carlo Ratti teaches at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he directs the Senseable City Lab, and is a founding part-ner of the international design and innovation office Carlo Ratti Associati. He graduated from the Politecnico di Torino and the École Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in Paris, and later earned his MPhil and PhD at the University of Cambridge, UK.

    A leading voice in the debate on new technologies’ impact on urban life and design, Car-lo has co-authored over 500 publications, including “The City of Tomorrow” (Yale University Press, with Matthew Claudel), and holds several technical patents. His articles and interviews have appeared on international media including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Financial Times, Scientific American, BBC, Project Syn-dicate, Corriere della Sera, Il Sole 24 Ore, Domus. His work has been exhibited worldwide at venues such as the Venice Biennale, the Design Museum Barcelona, the Science Museum in London, MAXXI in Rome, and MoMA in New York City.

    Carlo has been featured in Esquire Magazine’s ‘Best & Brightest’ list and in Thames & Hud-son’s selection of ‘60 innovators’ shaping our creative future. Blueprint Magazine included him as one of the ‘25 People Who Will Change the World of Design’, Forbes listed him as one of the ‘Names You Need To Know’ and Fast Company named him as one of the ’50 Most Influen-tial Designers in America’. He was also featured in Wired Magazine’s ‘Smart List: 50 people who will change the world’. Three of his projects – the Digital Water Pavilion, the Copenhagen Wheel and Scribit – have been included by TIME Magazine in the list of the ‘Best Inventions of the Year’.

    Carlo has been a presenter at TED (in 2011 and 2015), program director at the Strelka Insti-tute for Media, Architecture and Design in Moscow, curator of the BMW Guggenheim Pavilion in Berlin, and was named Inaugural Innovator in Residence by the Queensland Government. He was the curator of the Future Food District pavilion for the 2015 World Expo in Milan and chief curator of the "Eyes of the City" section at the 2019 UABB Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism of Shenzhen. He is currently serving as co-chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Cities and Urbanization. 

    The way we live, work, and play is very different today than it was just a few decades ago, thanks in large part to a network of connectivity that now encompasses most people on the planet. In a similar way, today we are at the beginning of a new technological revolution: the Internet is entering the physical space – the traditional domain of architecture and design – becoming an “Internet of Things” or IoT. As such, it is opening the door to a variety of applications that – in a similar way to what happened with the first wave of the Internet - can encompass many domains: from energy to mobility, from production to citizen participation. The contribution from Prof. Carlo Ratti will address these issues from a critical point of view through projects by the Senseable City Laboratory, a research initiative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the design office Carlo Ratti Associati.

    3:50 PM
    Erwin H. Schell Associate Professor of Management Science, MIT Sloan School of Management
    David Rand
    Erwin H. Schell Associate Professor of Management Science, MIT Sloan School of Management

    David Rand is the Erwin H. Schell Professor and Associate Professor of Management Science and Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT. Bridging the fields of cognitive science, behavioral economics, and social psychology, David’s research combines behavioral experiments and online/field studies with mathematical/computational models to understand human decision-making. His work focuses on illuminating why people believe and share misinformation and “fake news”; understanding political psychology and polarization; and promoting human cooperation. His work has been published in peer-reviewed journals such Nature, Science, PNAS, the American Economic Review, Psychological Science, Management Science, and the American Journal of Political Science, and has received widespread media attention. He has also written for popular press outlets including the New York Times, Wired, and New Scientist. He was named to Wired magazine’s Smart List 2012 of “50 people who will change the world,” chosen as a 2012 Pop!Tech Science Fellow, received the 2015 Arthur Greer Memorial Prize for Outstanding Scholarly Research, was selected as fact-checking researcher of the year in 2017 by the Poyner Institute’s International Fact-Checking Network, and received the 2020 FABBS Early Career Impact Award from the Society for Judgment and Decision Making. Papers he has coauthored have been awarded Best Paper of the Year in Experimental Economics, Social Cognition, and Political Methodology.

    (David Rand video time stamp starts at 37.31)

    The COVID-19 pandemic represents a substantial challenge to global human well-being. Not unlike other challenges (e.g., global warming), the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic depends on the actions of individual citizens and, therefore, the quality of the information to which people are exposed. Unfortunately, however, misinformation about COVID-19 has proliferated, including on social media. In this talk, Rand will present evidence that people share false claims about COVID-19 partly because they simply fail to think sufficiently about whether or not the content is accurate when deciding what to share.

    In a first study, participants were far worse at discerning between true and false content when deciding what they would share on social media relative to when they were asked directly about accuracy. Furthermore, greater cognitive reflection and science knowledge were associated with stronger discernment. In a second study, we found that a simple accuracy reminder at the beginning of the study (i.e., judging the accuracy of a non-COVID-19-related headline) nearly tripled the level of truth discernment in participants’ subsequent sharing intentions. Our results, which mirror those found previously for political fake news, suggest that nudging people to think about accuracy is a simple way to improve choices about what to share on social media.

    4:05 PM

    (Panel Q&A video time stamp starts at 54.55)

    4:30 PM

    Closing remarks
  • Day 3 - Tuesday, September 29, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

    Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

    Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow
    Vladimir Bulovic
    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow

    Vladimir Bulović is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding the Fariborz Maseeh Chair in Emerging Technology.  He directs the Organic and Nanostructured Electronics Laboratory, co-leads the MIT-Eni Solar Frontiers Center, leads the Tata GridEdge program, and is the Founding Director of MIT.nano, MIT's new 200,000 sqft nano-fabrication, nano-characterization, and prototyping facility. He is an author of over 250 research articles (cited over 50,000 times and recognized as the top 1% of the most highly cited in the Web of Science). He is an inventor of over 100 U.S. patents in areas of light emitting diodes, lasers, photovoltaics, photodetectors, chemical sensors, programmable memories, and micro-electro machines, majority of which have been licensed and utilized by both start-up and multinational companies.  The three start-up companies Bulović co-founded jointly employ over 350 people, and include Ubiquitous Energy, Inc., developing nanostructured solar technologies, Kateeva, Inc., focused on development of printed electronics, and QD Vision, Inc. (acquired in 2016) that produced quantum dot optoelectronic components.  Products of these companies have been used by millions.  Bulović was the first Associate Dean for Innovation of the School of Engineering and the Inaugural co-Director of MIT’s Innovation Initiative, which he co-led from 2013 to 2018. For his passion for teaching Bulović has been recognized with the MacVicar Fellowship, MIT’s highest teaching honor.  He completed his Electrical Engineering B.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees at Princeton University.

    1:10 PM
    David H. Koch Professor of Engineering, MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research
    Michael Cima
    David H. Koch Professor of Engineering, MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

    Dr. Michael J. Cima is the David H. Koch Professor of Engineering and a Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has an appointment at the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. He earned a B.S. in chemistry in 1982 (phi beta kappa) and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering in 1986, both from the University of California at Berkeley. Prof. Cima joined the MIT faculty in 1986 as an Assistant Professor. He was promoted to full Professor in 1995. He was elected a Fellow of the American Ceramics Society in 1997. Prof. Cima was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2011. He now holds the David H. Koch Chair of Engineering at MIT. He was appointed faculty director of the Lemelson-MIT Program in 2009 which is a program to inspire youth to be inventive and has a nationwide reach. In 2018, Cima was named a co-director of MIT's Innovation Initiative and the associate dean of innovation for the School of Engineering.

    Prof. Cima is author or co-author of over two hundred peer reviewed scientific publications, thirty seven US patents, and is a recognized expert in the field of materials processing. Prof. Cima is actively involved in materials and engineered systems for improvement in human health such as treatments for cancer, metabolic diseases, trauma, and urological disorders. Prof. Cima's research concerns advanced forming technology such as for complex macro and micro devices, colloid science, MEMS and other micro components for medical devices that are used for drug delivery and diagnostics, high-throughput development methods for formulations of materials and pharmaceutical formulations. He is a coinventor of MIT’s three dimensional printing process. His research has led to the development of chemically derived epitaxial oxide films for HTSC coated conductors. He and collaborators are developing implantable MEMS devices for unprecedented control in the delivery of pharmaceuticals and implantable diagnostic systems. Finally, through his consulting work he has been a major contributor to the development of high throughput systems for discovery of novel crystal forms and formulations of pharmaceuticals.

    Prof. Cima also has extensive entrepreneurial experience. He is co-founder of MicroChips Inc., a developer of microelectronic based drug delivery and diagnostic systems. Prof. Cima took two sabbaticals to act as senior consultant and management team member at Transform Pharmaceuticals Inc. a company that he helped start and that was ultimately acquired by Johnson and Johnson Corporation. He is a co-founder and director at T2 Biosystems a medical diagnostics company. Most recently, Prof. Cima co-founded SpringLeaf Therapeutics a specialty pharmaceutical company and Taris Biomedical a urology products company.

    Alfred Henry and Jean Morrison Hayes Career Development Associate Professor of Anthropology at MIT
    Amy Moran-Thomas
    Alfred Henry and Jean Morrison Hayes Career Development Associate Professor of Anthropology at MIT

    Amy Moran-Thomas is Alfred Henry and Jean Morrison Hayes Career Development Associate Professor of Anthropology at MIT. Her research bridges the anthropology of health and environment (chronic disease; ecological and agricultural change; metabolism and nutrition) with ethnographic studies of science and technology (medical devices; chemical infrastructures; technology and kinship). She is the author of the book Traveling with Sugar: Chronicles of a Global Epidemic (2019), and teaches courses on "The Social Lives of Medical Objects" at MIT.

    John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry
    Swager
    Timothy Swager
    John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry

    Timothy M. Swager is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry the Department of Chemistry at MIT and the Faculty Director of the Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation. In this latter role, Professor Swager works with the Center’s Executive Director to define the Center’s strategy for fostering innovation, assists with the commercialization of MIT technologies, and plays a key role in the grant selection process. Professor Swager also serves as the Center’s liaison to the MIT academic community, and senior leadership, sitting on faculty and academic committees. Following Professor Swager’s postdoctoral appointment at MIT, he joined the chemistry faculty at the University of Pennsylvania, returning to MIT in 1996 as a Professor of Chemistry, and served as the Head of Chemistry from 2005-2010. Professor Swager’s research interests are in design, synthesis, and study of organic-based electronic, sensory, high-strength and liquid crystalline materials. He has published more than 400 peer-reviewed papers and more than 80 issued/pending patents. Professor Swager is the founder of four companies (DyNuPol, Iptyx, PolyJoule, and C2Sense) and has served on a number of corporate and government boards.He received a B.S. from Montana State University in 1983 and a Ph.D., from the California Institute of Technology in 1988.

    Panel video time stamps starts at: .23

    1:50 PM

    Peek into research
    2:00 PM

    Empatica - AI systems to monitor human health through wearable sensors - video time stamp: 8.21

    C2Sense - Miniaturized mobile sensing solutions for a healthier and safer world - video time stamp: 18.22

    Dynocardia - Wearable, continuous, non-invasive blood pressure measurement - video time stamp: 26.26

    Lelantos – Revolutionizing vapor sensing for threat detection, air quality monitoring and medical diagnosis - video time stamp: 33.07

    Nextiles – Smart performance and injury monitoring apparel with more accessible and scalable technology - video time stamp: 43.32

    Program Manager, Empatica
    Chelsea Trengrove
    Program Manager, Empatica

    Dr. Chelsea Trengrove is Program Manager at Empatica, and has 5+ years of experience in international program management, business development, consulting, speaking, proposal writing, and regulatory compliance in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. A Ph.D. with strong foundations in neuroscience and pharmacology research, she joined Empatica's team as a program manager just prior to their FDA clearance in 2018 for their seizure monitoring and alerting wearable device, Embrace. At Empatica, Chelsea guides biotechnology companies through the framework, science, and applications of Empatica’s wearable technologies, as well as coordinates research initiatives, and clinical trials using Empatica’s Embrace and E4 devices from ideation to execution.

    Product Manager, C2Sense
    Merry Smith
    Product Manager, C2Sense

    Merry Smith is a Product Manager at C2Sense for the AuthenTags technology line, focusing on anti-counterfeiting applications in the pharmaceutical and high-end goods industries. She has a doctorate in chemistry from Wesleyan University (P.I. Prof. Brian Northrop) and prior to joining C2Sense in 2017, served as postdoctoral chemist at Dartmouth College (P.I. Prof. Katherine Mirica). She is co-inventor on 1 patent application and has published 12 peer-reviewed papers in the fields of carbon-rich nanomaterials and chemical sensor engineering.

    President & CEO, Dynocardia
    Mohan Thanikachalam
    President & CEO, Dynocardia

    Mohan Thanikachalam, MD is a cardiovascular surgeon with a long-standing interest in public health. He is President and CEO of Dynocardia. As a surgeon managing critically ill inpatients and a physician involved in the ongoing projects on case-finding through mass screening and offering community- and home-based services for diabetes and hypertension management, he has first-hand knowledge of the current blood pressure measuring devices and their limitations.  To address these limitations, as the principal investigator of a NIH grant, Mohan has led the joint effort (TUFTs and MIT) to develop the ViTrack technology, a first-of-its-kind cuff-less, wearable technology for continuous, non-invasive blood pressure monitoring. Mohan is a part-time faculty at Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) and was an Affiliate Faculty at MIT. His research includes the development and validation of point-of-care technologies for home-based cardiovascular risk assessment and disease monitoring to enable more comprehensive, community-based cardiovascular disease prevention and management strategies.  His team has developed a mobile phone-enabled peripheral neuropathy analyzer for persons with diabetes, which is currently being commercialized. He was the lead investigator to develop a patch ultrasound sensor as a point-of-care device for home monitoring of extra-vascular lung water for remote management of congestive heart failure. He has been the lead investigator for the clinical validation of other mobile enabled technologies such as, camera-based vital signs monitor, retinal camera, GynecCam and mobile-enabled spirometer.  As part of a NIH D43 Global Health Innovations program, he was involved in the efforts to translate some of these technologies to address health disparities in underserved populations in the developing world. 

    Co-Founder, Lelantos
    Stylianos Siontas
    Co-Founder, Lelantos

    PhD in Electrical Engineering at Brown University focused on semiconductor devices for sensing and energy generation. Currently at Columbia University working to commercialize gas sensing technology at Lelantos.

    CEO, Nextiles
    George Sun
    CEO, Nextiles

    George Sun is CEO of Nextiles. He has more than 10 years of engineering experience in electrical engineering, computer science, and biological engineering. He earned his Bachelors from UC Berkeley in Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering & Computer Science. He then completed his PhD in Biological Engineering at MIT with a focus in material science and synthetic biology. He has now moved to re-inventing wearable technologies by combining his skills in material science and electrical engineering with his company, Nextiles.

    3:10 PM
    Managing Director of Environment, MIT Health and Safety (EHS) Programs
    Tolga Durak
    Managing Director of Environment, MIT Health and Safety (EHS) Programs

    As MIT’s Managing Director of Environment, Health and Safety (EHS) Programs, Durak is the responsible administrator for health, safety and environmental programs for all MIT academic and administrative units.  Durak leads EHS to assure university activities are conducted in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, best business practices as well as by supporting development, implementation, and monitoring of prevention control strategies and initiatives. In addition to the main MIT campus, EHS provides support for and oversight over all off-site and international departments, laboratories and research centers.
     
    Durak holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering, a MS in Industrial & Systems Engineering and a PhD in Building Construction / Environmental Design and Planning. He has over 20 years of experience in engineering and EH&S in higher education. During his career, he has served in the capacity of EHS Director, Authority Having Jurisdiction, Responsible Official, Fire Marshal, Risk Manager, Radiation Safety Officer, Laser Safety Officer, Safety Engineer, Project Manager and Emergency Manager for government agencies as well as universities with extensive healthcare and research facilities. He is a practicing professional engineer, certified safety professional, certified building and fire official and an associate in risk management. During his academic tenure, Durak held engineering and public health faculty appointments. In addition to occupational safety and health, he has research interests in building sciences with emphasis on performance, energy efficiency, retrofitting solutions, systems integration, integrated control strategies and smart building materials. Durak is a proud father of twins Sam and Sloane and a competitive rower who races nationally and internationally in masters category.

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics
    Hosoi
    Anette (Peko) Hosoi
    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics

    Anette (Peko) Hosoi is a professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT.  She received her PhD in Physics from the University of Chicago and went on to become an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow in the MIT Department of Mathematics and at the Courant Institute, NYU. She is a leader in the study of the hydrodynamics of thin fluid films and in the nonlinear physical interaction of viscous fluids and deformable interfaces. Her work spans multiple disciplines including physics, biology and applied mathematics, and is being used, in collaboration with Schlumberger-Doll Research, Bluefin Robotics, and Boston Dynamics to guide the engineering design of robotic crawlers and other mechanisms. 

    Prof. Hosoi is an exceptional, innovative teacher and an inspiring mentor for women in engineering. She was awarded the Ruth and Joel Spira Award for Distinguished Teaching, and a MacVicar Fellowship. She is a recipient of the 3M Innovation Award and has held the Doherty Chair in Ocean Utilization at MIT. She is a Radcliffe Institute Fellow and a Fellow of the American Physical Society.  Her research interests include fluid mechanics, bioinspired design and locomotion, with a focus on optimization of crawling gastropods, digging bivalves, swimming microorganisms and soft robotics. Prof. Hosoi is also an avid mountain biker and her passion for sports has led her to create STE@M, Sports Technology & Education at MIT. STE@M is a program that is designed to build an interconnected community of faculty, students, industry partners, alums and athletes who are dedicated to applying their technical expertise to advance the state-of-the-art in sports.

    Professor of Medicine, Tufts Children's Hospital
    Robert Sege
    Professor of Medicine, Tufts Children's Hospital

    Robert Sege, MD, PhD is a Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine, where he directs the new Center for Community-Engaged Medicine. Dr. Sege is a Senior Fellow at the Center for the Study of Social Policy in Washington, is part of the Leadership Action Team for Massachusetts Essentials for Childhood Team, and serves on the boards of the Massachusetts Children’s Trust and Prevent Child Abuse America. He received the 2019 Ray E. Helfer award from the Alliance of Children’s Trusts and the American Academy of Pediatrics. He has served on national committees for the American Academy of Pediatrics and has been lead author on several important AAP policies. His extensive speaking and publication lists include contributions to the prevention and treatment of child maltreatment and youth violence. He is a graduate of Yale College, and received his PhD in Biology from MIT and his MD from Harvard Medical School. Bob lives in the Boston area, where he and his wife, Karen, have raised three young adult children.

    3:50 PM

    Closing remarks and looking to the future