Prof. Vladimir Bulovic

Associate Dean for Innovation, School of Engineering
Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Professor of Emerging Technology
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Primary DLC

MIT Energy Initiative

MIT Room: 13-3138

Assistant

Samantha Farrell
stf@mit.edu

Areas of Interest and Expertise

Nanostructured Organic Materials (Molecules, Polymers, Quantum Dots)
Opto-Electronic Structures
LEDs
Solar Cells and Solar Energy
Photodectors
Memory Cells
Chemical Sensors
MEMS
Thin Films
Self-Assembled Materials
Physical Properties of Organic and Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Thin Films, Structures, and Devices
Photonic Organic Devices of Nano-Scale Thickness
Lasers
Solar Cells
Transistors Flexible and Transparent Optoelectronics

Research Summary

Bulovic and his research group studies properties of organic thin films, structures and devices. The fundamental findings are applied to the development of optoelectronic, electronic and photonic organic devices of nanoscale thickness, including visible LEDs, lasers, solar cells, photodetectors, transistors, flexible and transparent optoelectronics. In addition to working on small-molecular-weight vander-Waals-bonded organic thin films, in the future we will also examine polymer solids, self-assembled materials, and hybrid organic/inorganic structures. We aim to reduce the size of active organic layers from the present nano-scale thickness of organic thin films to that of single molecules, with the ultimate goal of probing functionality of single molecules or polymer strands.

Research is focused on deciphering the physical properties that govern behavior of nanostructured materials and applying the findings to development of practical, active technologies. With focus on organic and inorganic-nanocrystal electronic and optoelectronic structures, to date we demonstrated efficient LEDs, lasers, solar cells, photodetectors, transistors, memory cells, and chemical sensors. In addition to working on small-molecular-weight van-der-Waals-bonded organic thin films, we also examine hybrid organic/inorganic structures, polymer solids, and self-assembled materials. Work tends towards the nano-scale where through development of new patterning and materials growth techniques we aim to reduce the size of active device layers from the present nano-scale thickness of organic thin films to that of single molecules or atomic clusters. The ultimate goal is to utilize the nano-scale functionality of molecules, polymers, and inorganic/organic hybrid assemblies in practical nano-scale devices and both small- and large-area integrated systems.

Recent Work

  • Video

    9.29.20-Nano-Sense-Day-3-Intro-Panel-1

    September 29, 2020Conference Video Duration: 50:55
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Vladimir Bulovic
    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow
    Michael Cima
    David H. Koch Professor of Engineering, MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research
    Amy Moran-Thomas
    Alfred Henry and Jean Morrison Hayes Career Development Associate Professor of Anthropology at MIT
    Timothy Swager
    John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry

    9.22.20-Nano-Sense-Day-2--BODY-SYSTEMS

    September 22, 2020Conference Video Duration: 127:57
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Vladimir Bulovic
    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow

    Introducing Analog Devices’ Digital Health business and the role of sensors in Medtech
    Brendan Cronin
    Director, Digital Healthcare Group at Analog Devices

    Peek into research

    Rapid Antigen Diagnostics for Emerging Pathogens
    Lee Gehrke
    Hermann L.F. von Helmholtz Professor of Health Sciences
    GI device development in a few movements
    Giovanni Traverso
    Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
    Electronic Textile Conformable Suit (E-TeCS)
    Canan Dagdeviren
    LG Career Development Professor of Media Arts and Sciences at MIT Media Lab
    MR relaxometer for improving clinical outcomes in hemodialysis
    Michael Cima
    David H. Koch Professor of Engineering, MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

    9.21.20-Nano.Sense-Day_1-Welcome-Sesson-1: CELL AND SUBCELL

    September 21, 2020Conference Video Duration: 127:34
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Vladimir Bulovic
    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow

    Keynote: MATERIALS, MEDICINE, HEALTH: SENSING THE WORLD AROUND US AT ALL SCALES
    Elazer Edelman
    Director, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, MIT
    Democratizing Single Molecule Nanoarrays
    Ashwin Gopinath
    Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering
    Interferometric Imaging for Studying Sickle Cell Disease and Cancer Metastasis
    Peter So
    Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Biological Engineering
    Dynamic Lens Systems for Biosensing
    Timothy Swager
    John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry

    Vladimir Bulovic - 2019 RD Conference

    November 20, 2019Conference Video Duration: 25:23

    MIT.nano

    Vladimir Bulovic will provide an overview role of MIT.nano in supporting research, innovation, and corporate engagement in the area of Human and Technology Collaboration.

    2019 MIT Research and Development Conference

    Vladimir Bulovic - 2018 ICT Conference

    April 11, 2018Conference Video Duration: 32:10

    Future will be Measured in Nanometers

    The nano age is upon us. With nanoscale advancements we are reimagining health and life sciences, energy, computing, information technology, manufacturing, and quantum science. Nano is not a specific technology. It does not belong to a particular industry or discipline, it is, rather, a revolutionary way of understanding and working with matter, and it is the key to launching the next innovation age…the nano age.

    2018 MIT Information and Communication Technologies Conference