Past Event

2019 SENSE.nano Symposium

September 30, 2019
2019 SENSE.nano Symposium

Location

Samberg Conference Center, Building E52
50 Memorial Dr, Cambridge, MA 02142

Overview

This full-day symposium will highlight the needs for new SENSE technologies, showcase research and innovations, and present the impact of these technologies. One symposium stream will be sensing for AR / VR. The second symposium stream will be in sensing for advanced manufacturing. SENSE includes sensors, new instrumentation, remote sensing, and other measurements technologies. Technical, business, and visionary leaders from MIT, industry, and society will share their experiences and insight via a series of invited technical talks, presentations by MIT-launched startups, posters, and a panel discussion.

  • Overview

    This full-day symposium will highlight the needs for new SENSE technologies, showcase research and innovations, and present the impact of these technologies. One symposium stream will be sensing for AR / VR. The second symposium stream will be in sensing for advanced manufacturing. SENSE includes sensors, new instrumentation, remote sensing, and other measurements technologies. Technical, business, and visionary leaders from MIT, industry, and society will share their experiences and insight via a series of invited technical talks, presentations by MIT-launched startups, posters, and a panel discussion.


Agenda

8:30am

Welcome Remarks

Dean, MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

Huttenlocher
Daniel Huttenlocher

Dean, MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

Daniel Huttenlocher is the inaugural dean of the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing. He began his academic career at Cornell University in 1988, where he was a member of the computer science faculty. In 1998, he chaired the task force that led to the creation of Cornell’s interdisciplinary Faculty of Computing and Information Science, later serving as its dean starting in 2009. In 2012, he became the founding dean of the new Cornell Tech campus in New York City.

Huttenlocher has extensive industry experience, having served as a scientist and lab director at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center for 12 years before leaving to help establish a financial technology startup, Intelligent Markets, in 2000.

Huttenlocher’s research and scholarship in computer science is broad and interdisciplinary, spanning algorithms, social media, and computer vision. He has earned the Longuet-Higgins Award for Fundamental Advances in Computer Vision (2010), and various fellowships and awards from the National Science Foundation, the Association for Computing Machinery, IEEE, and Phi Beta Kappa.

He is a member of the boards of directors of Amazon and Corning, and of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, where he has served as chair since 2018.

Huttenlocher earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan in 1980, double-majoring in computer and communication sciences and experimental psychology. An MIT alumnus, he earned an SM in electrical engineering and computer science in 1984 and a PhD in computer science in 1988.

Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow
Vladimir Bulovic
Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow

Vladimir Bulović is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding the Fariborz Maseeh Chair in Emerging Technology.  He directs the Organic and Nanostructured Electronics Laboratory, co-leads the MIT-Eni Solar Frontiers Center, leads the Tata GridEdge program, and is the Founding Director of MIT.nano, MIT's new 200,000 sqft nano-fabrication, nano-characterization, and prototyping facility. He is an author of over 250 research articles (cited over 50,000 times and recognized as the top 1% of the most highly cited in the Web of Science). He is an inventor of over 100 U.S. patents in areas of light emitting diodes, lasers, photovoltaics, photodetectors, chemical sensors, programmable memories, and micro-electro machines, majority of which have been licensed and utilized by both start-up and multinational companies.  The three start-up companies Bulović co-founded jointly employ over 350 people, and include Ubiquitous Energy, Inc., developing nanostructured solar technologies, Kateeva, Inc., focused on development of printed electronics, and QD Vision, Inc. (acquired in 2016) that produced quantum dot optoelectronic components.  Products of these companies have been used by millions.  Bulović was the first Associate Dean for Innovation of the School of Engineering and the Inaugural co-Director of MIT’s Innovation Initiative, which he co-led from 2013 to 2018. For his passion for teaching Bulović has been recognized with the MacVicar Fellowship, MIT’s highest teaching honor.  He completed his Electrical Engineering B.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees at Princeton University.

8:45am

Morning Keynote
Global CSO, NCSOFT
Yoon
Songyee Yoon
Global CSO

Dr. Songyee Yoon is an accomplished entrepreneur, innovator and investor, who is well-versed in both technology and business. She is currently serving as Chief Strategy Officer and president of NCSOFT, a global digital entertainment company and one of the leading video game publishers. She was instrumental in the establishment of the company and recently in foundation of the NCSOFT AI Center and Natural Language Processing Centers, advanced AI research facilities within NCSOFT created to help further the company’s use of AI and machine learning technology. Songyee was also the architect behind the introduction of the intelligent and personalized data services platform as well as the intelligent data services over mobile platforms for SK Telecom, the largest wireless service provider in South Korea. As a chairperson of the NCSOFT Culture Foundation, Songyee actively engages in diverse philanthropic initiatives, including sponsoring Special Olympics participants, collaborating with UN Food Programs and helping refugees through UNHCR. She has been recognized by various organizations for her leadership, which includes being named as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum, a Young Leader by the Boao Forum of China and one of the 50 Women to Watch in business by the Wall Street Journal. She is one of the founding members of FIRA Micro Robot Soccer Competition and a Ph.D. recipient from MIT in Computational Neuroscience based on her research at the MIT Media Lab. Songyee has served on the Presidential Advisory Council for Science and Technology for South Korea’s 16th president, Roh Moo-hyun and the 15th president, Kim Dae-jung. She taught Media and Entertainment Business Strategy as an adjunct professor at Yonsei University in Seoul, one of South Korea’s most prestigious learning institutions. She currently is a chairperson of the Asia Business Leaders Council of the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, an advisory board member for the RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy and a trustee of the MIT Corporation.


Session 1: Interaction, Fabrication, and Transportation
9:30am

Session 1 Block Intro
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
Brian Anthony
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

9:35am

Director, Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE)
Professor of Digital Media & AI

Fox
D. Fox Harrell

Director, Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE)
Professor of Digital Media & AI

D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D., is Professor of Digital Media & Artificial Intelligence in the Comparative Media Studies Program and Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT. He is the director of the MIT Center for Advanced Virtuality. His research explores the relationship between imagination and computation and involves inventing new forms of VR, computational narrative, videogaming for social impact, and related digital media forms. The National Science Foundation has recognized Harrell with an NSF CAREER Award for his project “Computing for Advanced Identity Representation.” Dr. Harrell holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Cognitive Science from the University of California, San Diego. His other degrees include a Master’s degree in Interactive Telecommunication from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, and a B.S. in Logic and Computation and B.F.A. in Art (electronic and time-based media) from Carnegie Mellon University – each with highest honors. He has worked as an interactive television producer and as a game designer. His book Phantasmal Media: An Approach to Imagination, Computation, and Expression was published by the MIT Press (2013).

The MIT Center for Advanced Virtuality (MIT Virtuality for short) pioneers innovative experiences using technologies of virtuality — computing systems that construct imaginative experiences atop our physical world. Our approach to engineering and creative practices pushes the expressive potential of technologies of virtuality and simulates social and cognitive phenomena, while intrinsically considering their social and cultural impacts. This talk focuses on an important aspect of such technologies: virtual selves. Indeed nearly early everyone these days uses virtual identities, ranging from accounts for social media and online shopping to avatars in videogames or virtual reality. Given the widespread and growing use of such technologies, it is important to better understand their impacts and to establish innovative and best practices. In this talk, Harrell explores how our social identities are complicated by their intersection with extended reality technologies, videogames, social media, and related digital media forms. With an emphasis on equity, Harrell will explore how virtual identities both implement and transform persistent issues of class, gender, sex, race, ethnicity, and the dynamically construction social categories more generally.

9:50am

High Resolution Tactile Sensing for HCI, Robotics and VR/AR

Esther and Harold E Edgerton Career Development Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Matusik
Wojciech Matusik

Esther and Harold E Edgerton Career Development Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Wojciech Matusik is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT, where he leads the Computational Fabrication Group. Before coming to MIT, he worked at Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, Adobe Systems, and Disney Research Zurich. He studied computer graphics at MIT and received his PhD in 2003. He also received a BS in EECS from the University of California at Berkeley in 1997 and MS in EECS from MIT in 2001. His research interests are in direct digital manufacturing and computer graphics. In 2004, he was named one of the world's top 100 young innovators by MIT's Technology Review Magazine. In 2009, he received the Significant New Researcher Award from ACM Siggraph. In 2012, Matusik received the DARPA Young Faculty Award and he was named a Sloan Research Fellow.

Humans can feel, weigh and grasp diverse objects, and simultaneously infer their material properties while applying the right amount of force—a challenging set of tasks for a modern robot. Mechanoreceptor networks that provide sensory feedback and enable the dexterity of the human grasp remain difficult to replicate in robots. Although computer-vision-based robot grasping strategies have progressed substantially, there are as yet no equivalent sensing platforms and large-scale datasets with which to probe the use of the tactile information that humans rely on when grasping objects.

10:05am

Challenges and opportunities in robotics: from self driving cars to the micro- and nano-scale?

Samuel C Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
Associate Head for Research, Mechanical Engineering
Co-Director, Ford-MIT Alliance
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

John Leonard

Samuel C Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
Associate Head for Research, Mechanical Engineering
Co-Director, Ford-MIT Alliance
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

John J. Leonard is Samuel C. Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering and Associate Department Head for Research in the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering. He is also a member of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). His research addresses the problems of navigation and mapping for autonomous mobile robots and underwater vehicles. He holds the degrees of B.S.E.E. in Electrical Engineering and Science from the University of Pennsylvania (1987) and D.Phil. in Engineering Science from the University of Oxford (1994). He was team leader for MIT's DARPA Urban Challenge team, which was one of eleven teams to qualify for the Urban Challenge final event and one of six teams to complete the race. He is the recipient of an NSF Career Award (1998) and the King-Sun Fu Memorial Best Transactions on Robotics Paper Award (2006). He is an IEEE Fellow (2014).

We will briefly describe some of the challenges and opportunities in autonomous robotics, with a focus on self-driving cars. Some of the major challenges in include high-resolution 3D mapping, fusing data from multiple types of sensors, and achieving robust decision-making with uncertain perception data. We will also present some thoughts on applying some of the techniques used in self-driving, such as simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), to micro- and nano-scale environments.

10:20am

Session 1 Panel with Q&A
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
Brian Anthony
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

Director, Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE)
Professor of Digital Media & AI

Fox
D. Fox Harrell

Director, Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE)
Professor of Digital Media & AI

D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D., is Professor of Digital Media & Artificial Intelligence in the Comparative Media Studies Program and Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT. He is the director of the MIT Center for Advanced Virtuality. His research explores the relationship between imagination and computation and involves inventing new forms of VR, computational narrative, videogaming for social impact, and related digital media forms. The National Science Foundation has recognized Harrell with an NSF CAREER Award for his project “Computing for Advanced Identity Representation.” Dr. Harrell holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Cognitive Science from the University of California, San Diego. His other degrees include a Master’s degree in Interactive Telecommunication from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, and a B.S. in Logic and Computation and B.F.A. in Art (electronic and time-based media) from Carnegie Mellon University – each with highest honors. He has worked as an interactive television producer and as a game designer. His book Phantasmal Media: An Approach to Imagination, Computation, and Expression was published by the MIT Press (2013).

Samuel C Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
Associate Head for Research, Mechanical Engineering
Co-Director, Ford-MIT Alliance
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

John Leonard

Samuel C Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
Associate Head for Research, Mechanical Engineering
Co-Director, Ford-MIT Alliance
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

John J. Leonard is Samuel C. Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering and Associate Department Head for Research in the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering. He is also a member of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). His research addresses the problems of navigation and mapping for autonomous mobile robots and underwater vehicles. He holds the degrees of B.S.E.E. in Electrical Engineering and Science from the University of Pennsylvania (1987) and D.Phil. in Engineering Science from the University of Oxford (1994). He was team leader for MIT's DARPA Urban Challenge team, which was one of eleven teams to qualify for the Urban Challenge final event and one of six teams to complete the race. He is the recipient of an NSF Career Award (1998) and the King-Sun Fu Memorial Best Transactions on Robotics Paper Award (2006). He is an IEEE Fellow (2014).


Session 2: Motion, Manipulation, and Sound
10:50am

Session 2 Block Intro

Director Transmedia Storytelling Initiative
Professor Department of Architecture

Caroline Jones
Caroline Jones

Director Transmedia Storytelling Initiative
Professor Department of Architecture

Caroline A. Jones is Professor in the History, Theory, Criticism section of the Department of Architecture at MIT. She studies modern and contemporary art, with a particular focus on its technological modes of production, distribution, and reception, and on its interface with sciences such as physics, neuroscience, and biology. Jones has also worked as a curator, notably at MIT’s List Visual Art Center: Sensorium (2006), Video Trajectories (2007), and Hans Haacke 1967 (2011). Her publications include Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist (1996/98, winner of the Charles Eldredge prize), Picturing Science, Producing Art (co-edited, 1998), Sensorium: embodied experience, technology, and contemporary art (as editor, 2006), Eyesight Alone: Clement Greenberg’s Modernism and the Bureaucratization of the Senses (2005/08), Experience: Culture, Cognition, and the Common Sense (co-edited, 2016), and The Global Work of Art (2016). Her current research collaboration with historian of science Peter Galison examines patterns of occlusion and political contestation in seeing and unseeing the Anthropocene; she is also working on practices and histories of “bio art.”

10:55am

In-Home Wireless Health Monitoring: From Wearables to Invisibles

Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Director, Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT)
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Dina
Dina Katabi

Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Director, Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT)
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Dina Katabi is the Andrew & Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and the director of MIT’s Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT). Katabi is also a MacArthur Fellow and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. She received her PhD and MS from MIT and her BS from Damascus University. Katabi has received the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award, the Faculty Research Innovation Fellowship, the Sloan Fellowship, the NBX Career Development chair, and the NSF CAREER award. Katabi's doctoral dissertation won an ACM Honorable Mention award and a Sprowls award for academic excellence. Further, her work was recognized by the IEEE William R. Bennett prize, three ACM SIGCOMM Best Paper awards, an NSDI Best Paper award, the SIGCOMM Test-of-Time award, and a TR10 award for her work on the sparse Fourier transform. Several start-ups have been spun out of Katabi's lab, such as PiCharging and Emerald.

This talk discusses advances in wireless sensing that allow for monitoring people’s movements, gait, falls, sleep patterns, breathing, and heart rate, all without putting any sensor on the person. The new technology can even see people’s movements through walls and occlusions. The device transmits a low power radio signal (1000 times less power than WiFi) and analyses the interaction of the signal with the human body to derive precise information about a person’s location, movement, and physiological characteristics. A key challenge in realizing this technology is that radio signals interact with essentially everything in the environment. Any attempt to monitor a person has to somehow identify and isolate relevant information from pervasive interference and extraneous reflections from objects in the environment. We overcome this challenge using an interdisciplinary approach that combines innovations in signal processing, machine learning, and wireless systems.

11:25am

Immersive Sound and the Curvature of Social Space-Time: Using Spatial Audio for Learning, Art, and Democracy

Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies
MIT Anthropology

Condry
Ian Condry

Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies
MIT Anthropology

Ian Condry is a cultural anthropologist in the department of Comparative Media Studies / Writing at MIT, where he has been teaching since 2002. He is the author of two books, The Soul of Anime and Hip-Hop Japan, both of which analyze how cultural movements go global from below. He is the founder of the MIT Spatial Sound Lab which is part of a larger project called Dissolve Music, bringing together sound artists, musicians, educators, and technologists to explore the transformative potential of sound for learning, democracy, and the arts.

What if, instead of screens on our heads, we imagined immersive experiences in terms of 360-degree sound in open spaces? How can developments in spatial audio transform our understandings of sound, learning and democracy? How can we learn from the sociality of musical experiences to deepen our approaches to education, research, and the arts?

11:40am

Session 2 Panel with Q&A

Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Director, Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT)
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Dina
Dina Katabi

Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Director, Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT)
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Dina Katabi is the Andrew & Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and the director of MIT’s Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT). Katabi is also a MacArthur Fellow and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. She received her PhD and MS from MIT and her BS from Damascus University. Katabi has received the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award, the Faculty Research Innovation Fellowship, the Sloan Fellowship, the NBX Career Development chair, and the NSF CAREER award. Katabi's doctoral dissertation won an ACM Honorable Mention award and a Sprowls award for academic excellence. Further, her work was recognized by the IEEE William R. Bennett prize, three ACM SIGCOMM Best Paper awards, an NSDI Best Paper award, the SIGCOMM Test-of-Time award, and a TR10 award for her work on the sparse Fourier transform. Several start-ups have been spun out of Katabi's lab, such as PiCharging and Emerald.

Class of 1957 Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering Department
Rodriguez
Alberto Rodriguez
Class of 1957 Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering Department

Alberto Rodriguez is the Class of 1957 Associate Professor at the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT. Alberto graduated in Mathematics ('05) and Telecommunication Engineering ('06) from the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, and earned his PhD (’13) from the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He leads the Manipulation and Mechanisms Lab at MIT (MCube) researching autonomous dexterous manipulation, robot automation, and end-effector design. Alberto has received Best Paper Awards at conferences RSS’11, ICRA’13, RSS’18, IROS'18, and RSS'19, the 2018 Best Manipulation System Paper Award from Amazon, and has been finalist for best paper awards at IROS’16, IROS'18, ICRA'20 and RSS'20. He has led Team MIT-Princeton in the Amazon Robotics Challenge between 2015 and 2017, and has received Faculty Research Awards from Amazon in 2018, 2019 and 2020, and from Google in 2020. He is also the recipient of the 2020 IEEE Early Academic Career Award in Robotics and Automation. 

Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies
MIT Anthropology

Condry
Ian Condry

Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies
MIT Anthropology

Ian Condry is a cultural anthropologist in the department of Comparative Media Studies / Writing at MIT, where he has been teaching since 2002. He is the author of two books, The Soul of Anime and Hip-Hop Japan, both of which analyze how cultural movements go global from below. He is the founder of the MIT Spatial Sound Lab which is part of a larger project called Dissolve Music, bringing together sound artists, musicians, educators, and technologists to explore the transformative potential of sound for learning, democracy, and the arts.

Director Transmedia Storytelling Initiative
Professor Department of Architecture

Caroline Jones
Caroline Jones

Director Transmedia Storytelling Initiative
Professor Department of Architecture

Caroline A. Jones is Professor in the History, Theory, Criticism section of the Department of Architecture at MIT. She studies modern and contemporary art, with a particular focus on its technological modes of production, distribution, and reception, and on its interface with sciences such as physics, neuroscience, and biology. Jones has also worked as a curator, notably at MIT’s List Visual Art Center: Sensorium (2006), Video Trajectories (2007), and Hans Haacke 1967 (2011). Her publications include Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist (1996/98, winner of the Charles Eldredge prize), Picturing Science, Producing Art (co-edited, 1998), Sensorium: embodied experience, technology, and contemporary art (as editor, 2006), Eyesight Alone: Clement Greenberg’s Modernism and the Bureaucratization of the Senses (2005/08), Experience: Culture, Cognition, and the Common Sense (co-edited, 2016), and The Global Work of Art (2016). Her current research collaboration with historian of science Peter Galison examines patterns of occlusion and political contestation in seeing and unseeing the Anthropocene; she is also working on practices and histories of “bio art.”


Session 3: MIT ILP and the Startup Exchange
11:55am

Introduction to the MIT Industrial Liaison Program
Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
Director, Alliance Management
MIT Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer
Karl Koster, Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
Karl Koster
Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
Director, Alliance Management
MIT Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer

Karl Koster is the Executive Director of MIT Corporate Relations. MIT Corporate Relations includes the MIT Industrial Liaison Program and MIT Startup Exchange.

In that capacity, Koster and his staff work with the leadership of MIT and senior corporate executives to design and implement strategies for fostering corporate partnerships with the Institute. Koster and his team have also worked to identify and design a number of major international programs for MIT, which have been characterized by the establishment of strong, programmatic linkages among universities, industry, and governments. Most recently these efforts have been extended to engage the surrounding innovation ecosystem, including its vibrant startup and small company community, into MIT's global corporate and university networks.

Koster is also the Director of Alliance Management in the Office of Strategic Alliances and Technology Transfer (OSATT). OSATT was launched in Fall 2019 as part of a plan to reinvent MIT’s research administration infrastructure. OSATT develops agreements that facilitate MIT projects, programs and consortia with industrial, nonprofit, and international sponsors, partners and collaborators.

He is past chairman of the University-Industry Demonstration Partnership (UIDP), an organization that seeks to enhance the value of collaborative partnerships between universities and corporations.

He graduated from Brown University with a BA in geology and economics, and received an MS from MIT Sloan School of Management. Prior to returning to MIT, Koster worked as a management consultant in Europe, Latin America, and the United States on projects for private and public sector organizations.

12:05pm

Startup Exchange: Overview and Lightning Talks

Program Director, MIT Startup Exchange

Dahllof
Marcus Dahllöf

Program Director, MIT Startup Exchange

Marcus Dahllöf leads MIT Startup Exchange, which facilitates connections between MIT-connected startups and corporate members of the MIT Industrial Liaison Program (ILP). Dahllöf manages networking events, workshops, the STEX25 accelerator, opportunity postings, and helps define the strategic direction of MIT Startup Exchange. He is a two-time tech entrepreneur (one exit in cybersecurity), and has previously held roles in finance, software engineering, corporate strategy, and business development at emerging tech companies and Fortune 100 corporations in the U.S., Latin America, and Europe. Marcus was a member of the Swedish national rowing team and he is a mentor at the MIT Venture Mentoring Service.

Cofounder & CEO, iQ3Connect
Merchant
Ali Merchant
Cofounder & CEO

Ali Merchant is the cofounder and CEO of iQ3Connect. He has more than 10 years of experience with the computational methods and application of design methodologies in the aerospace industry. Merchant has worked with major US engine manufacturers, NASA, and DoD on advanced research projects. He holds a Masters and PhD from the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT.

Founder & CEO, Prescient Devices
Andy Wang
Andy Wang
Founder & CEO

Andy Wang is the founder and CEO of Prescient Devices, Inc., an MIT startup pioneering design automation technology for distributed and fragmented IoT systems. Wang was the cofounder and CTO of GTI IoT Technology, a leading supplier of low-power wireless IoT solutions, where he helped grow GTI from a two-person founding team to a profitable company with 150+ employees. Prior to GTI, he was a senior design engineer at Analog Devices, where he developed high-speed integrated circuits and systems. Wang graduated with a PhD degree from MIT.

Cofounder & CEO, Inkbit
Marini
Davide Marini
Cofounder & CEO

Davide Marini is cofounder and CEO of Inkbit, an MIT startup pioneering the use of machine vision in 3D printing. Prior to Inkbit, Marini was CEO of Firefly BioWorks, an MIT startup that developed a new microfabrication technology by combining photolithography with microfluidics. Firefly’s first product allowed multiplexed detection of cellular and circulating microRNAs on standard flow cytometers. The company was acquired by Abcam. Marini holds a BS in industrial engineering from Politecnico of Milan and a PhD in mechanical engineering from MIT.

Founder & CEO, NODAR
Jiang
Leaf Jiang
Founder & CEO

Leaf Jiang, CEO and Founder of NODAR Inc., has founded two successful high-tech companies that have generated positive revenue and whose products have earned R&D100 Magazine Awards and InnoCentive Challenge Awards. Jiang is an expert in LIDAR, has published extensively in the field at MIT Lincoln Laboratory for 12 years, and has a PhD in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT.

Founder & CEO, Spectrohm
Cargol
Tim Cargol
Founder & CEO

Tim Cargol earned his BS and M.Eng degrees in electrical engineering from MIT and founded his first startup out of MIT’s High Voltage Research Laboratory in 2002. After inventing radio-frequency based internal imaging, Cargol left a career in the US Federal Government in 2018 to found Spectrohm and commercialize the technology.

Cofounder, CEO & CTO, Hosta Labs
Villalon
Rachelle Villalon
Cofounder, CEO & CTO

Rachelle Villalon holds a PhD in architecture and computer science from MIT. Prior to this, she worked as head of R&D for Gehry Technologies. Villalon is the brain behind Hosta Labs technology -- a novel, patent-pending technology that captures dimensions and respective objects from just a single photo of an existing space. There are only a handful of students every year that graduate in the space of technology and architecture, and this unique knowledge drives Villalon to develop novel solutions for old problems in the build environment.

Co-Founder & CTO, GelSight
Janos Rohaly
Janos Rohaly
Co-Founder & CTO

János Rohaly is a hands-on high-tech entrepreneur with experience in building successful businesses and creating game changing imaging products out of a research idea. He co-founded Brontes Technologies, Inc. in 2003 while he was a Research Scientist at the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT. As co-inventor of the core technology and Chief Scientist of Brontes Technologies he led the technology commercialization effort to create the world's first real time, intraoral, 3-D imaging device that replaced traditional paste-based impressions in dentistry and orthodontics. Brontes was acquired by 3M in 2006 delivering an 8X return to the investors. After the acquisition János stayed on board with 3M for 5 years as Chief Scientist of the newly created Digital Oral Care Department. He holds a doctorate degree in optical diagnostics in fluids from Kobe University in Japan, and an M.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University of Budapest in Hungary. János has fifteen patents spanning the space of novel optics and algorithms in the field of three-dimensional imaging.

iQ3Connect: VR platform for collaboration
Prescient Devices: Design automation for IoT
Inkbit: 3D printing powered by machine vision (ocular sensors) and AI
NODAR: Next-gen LiDAR 3D sensors
Spectrohm: Imaging deep inside objects with radio waves
Hosta Labs: Sensing to generate 3D maps of building interiors
GelSight: Handheld sensor for topography
 



MIT Startup Exchange actively promotes collaboration and partnerships between MIT-connected startups and industry. Qualified startups are those founded and/or led by MIT faculty, staff, or alumni, or are based on MIT-licensed technology. Industry participants are principally members of MIT’s Industrial Liaison Program (ILP).

MIT Startup Exchange maintains a propriety database of over 1,500 MIT-connected startups with roots across MIT departments, labs and centers; it hosts a robust schedule of startup workshops and showcases, and facilitates networking and introductions between startups and corporate executives.

STEX25 is a startup accelerator within MIT Startup Exchange, featuring 25 “industry ready” startups that have proven to be exceptional with early use cases, clients, demos, or partnerships, and are poised for significant growth. STEX25 startups receive promotion, travel, and advisory support, and are prioritized for meetings with ILP’s 230 member companies.

MIT Startup Exchange and ILP are integrated programs of MIT Corporate Relations.

12:35pm

Networking Lunch with Startup Exhibit
1:50pm

Afternoon Keynote: Dow Chemical
Global Operations Technology Director, The Dow Chemical Company
Bardin
Billy Bardin
Global Operations Technology Director

Billy B. Bardin is the Global Operations Technology Director for Dow. His responsibilities include driving technology and innovation strategy within Manufacturing and Engineering (M&E) and oversight of all commercial technologies as well as development of technical talent across manufacturing and supporting operations.

Bardin began his career in 2000 with Union Carbide/Dow in the Catalyst Skill Center in South Charleston, WV, where he led alternative feedstock and catalytic process development programs. In 2001, he joined the Chemicals Sciences group within Core R&D, leading programs in the areas of alternative feedstocks, paraffin functionalization, and olefin partial oxidation. While in Chemical Sciences, Bardin relocated to Dow facilities in Midland, MI; Horgen, Switzerland; and Terneuzen, The Netherlands as leader for the development of Dow’s high throughput heterogeneous catalyst testing capability.

In 2007, Bardin was named leader for the North American Production Support Group within the Hydrocarbons and Energy business in Freeport, TX. He led efforts in cracker plant support and developed R&D programs in next generation cracker technology. The following year, he accepted the combined role of R&D Director for Chemicals and The Dow Technology Licensing and Catalyst (DTLC) Business where he drove both internal R&D programs and technology/catalyst development efforts for licensee sales. In 2010, Bardin became R&D Director for the Feedstocks, Hydrocarbons and Chemicals businesses, leading the technology strategy for Dow’s hydrocarbons and alternative feedstock efforts and developing options to provide cost advantaged chemical feedstocks to Dow’s downstream product portfolio. Bardin was named to his current position in 2014.

Bardin holds a BS in chemical engineering from North Carolina State University and an MS and PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia. He is a Registered, Professional Engineer (PE) with the WV State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers. Bardin is past Chair of the Industrial Advisory Board for the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University and a member of the advisory boards for the Departments of Chemical Engineering at the University of Virginia and North Carolina State University. He was elected to the Board of Directors for the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) in 2016. He is also a Fellow of the AIChE and holds board seats for the MxD and RAPID manufacturing institutes.


Session 4: Stories, History, and Augmentation
2:35pm

Egyptian Blue: the Antiquity-inspired Innovation

Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Admir Masic
Admir Masic

Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Admir Masic is an Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the MIT. He is also an archaeological materials faculty fellow for the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) at the Center for Materials Research in Archaeology and Ethnology (CMRAE) and founder of the MIT Refugee Action Hub (MIT ReACT). His research focuses on the development of high performance, in situ and multiscale characterization techniques to investigate complex biological and archaeological materials. His group explores ancient technologies as a source of inspiration for the development of a new generation of more durable and sustainable building materials. In 2019, Masic received the CEE Masheeh Excellence Teaching Award. From 2008-2015, Masic, was an independent group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interface in Potsdam, Germany. He completed his physical chemistry MS and PhD degrees at University of Turin.

In the first century BCE, Roman architect and engineer Vitruvius described how to produce the first artificial pigment known as Egyptian blue. Recently discovered optical properties of Egyptian blue point towards alternative applications in the various fields such as biomedicine, sensing, solar energy, nanotech, etc. This talk weaves together history, engineering, science, and modern technologies, to describe how we can harness remarkable properties associated with light scattering and durability of the Egyptian blue in the design of modern solutions. I will also describe current work on virtual representations of historical objects through augmented reality.

2:50pm

Photo-Chromeleon: Re-Programmable Multi-Color Textures Using Photochromic Dyes

Postdoctoral Associate at HCI Engineering Group
CSAIL, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Wessely
Michael Wessely

Postdoctoral Associate at HCI Engineering Group
CSAIL, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Michael Wessely (michaelwessely.com) is a postdoctoral researcher working with Prof. Stefanie Mueller in the HCIE group at MIT CSAIL. He holds a PhD from Université Paris-Saclay, France and a Master’s degree from Saarland University, Germany. His PhD thesis bridges the gap between material science and human-computer interaction and his work has received two ACM UIST best paper awards. His current research focuses on developing interaction-aware materials that can change shape and color, and scale from small prototypes to interactive architecture.

In this talk, I present a method to create re-programmable multi-color textures that are made from a single material only. The key idea builds on the use of photochromic inks that can switch their appearance from transparent to colored when exposed to light of a certain wavelength. By mixing cyan, magenta, and yellow (CMY) photochromic dyes into a single solution and leveraging the different absorption spectra of each dye, we can control each color channel in the solution separately. Our approach can transform single-material fabrication techniques, such as coating, into high-resolution multi-color processes.

I discuss the material mixing procedure, modifications to the light source, and the algorithm to control each color channel. I then show the results from an experiment in which we evaluated the available color space and the resolution of our textures. Finally, I demonstrate our user interface that allows users to transfer virtual textures onto physical objects and show a range of application examples.

3:05pm

Introducing the MIT.nano Immersion Lab
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
Brian Anthony
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

In this talk I will highlight the new infrastructure and support on campus which enables the use and study of AR/VR in manufacturing, in data visualization, in human health, in education, and more.

3:20pm

Break

Session 5: Sensing, Society, and Technology
3:35pm

Panel Discussion
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
Brian Anthony
Associate Director, MIT.nano
Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

Clarence J. LeBel Professor,
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

Duane Boning
Duane Boning

Clarence J. LeBel Professor,
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

Duane S. Boning is Professor of Electrical Engineering and Comput¬er Science at MIT, where he holds the Clarence J. LeBel chair. He is affiliated with the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories, where he serves as Associate Director for Computation and CAD. He also serves as Co-Director of the MIT Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) dual MBA/Engineering Master’s degree program. He received SB, SM, and PhD degrees in electri¬cal engineering and computer science from MIT. From 1991 to 1993 he was a Member Technical Staff at the Texas Instruments Semiconductor Process and Design Center in Dal¬las, Texas, before returning to MIT to join the EECS faculty.

At MIT, he served as Associate Head for Electrical Engineering in the EECS Department from 2004 to 2011, as Director of the MIT-Masdar Institute Cooperative Program from 2011 to 2018, and as Faculty Lead of the MIT-Skoltech Initiative from 2011 through 2013. From July 2019 to June 2021 he is Associate Chair of the MIT Faculty. Dr. Boning is a Fellow of the IEEE, and was Editor in Chief for the IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing from 2001 to 2011. His research interests include statistical and machine learning methods for the modeling and control of variation in IC and photonics process¬es, devices, and circuits. Particular emphases includes modeling of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), plasma etch, and embossing processes; and design for manufacturing (DFM) in IC and photonic technologies. He is co-editor of the book Machine Learning in VLSI Computer-Aided Design (Springer 2019).

Director, Visualization Research and Teaching Laboratory, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University
Gant
Rus Gant
Director, Visualization Research and Teaching Laboratory

Rus Gant is a well-regarded international 3D artist, computer engineer and educator. He is currently on the Research staff at Harvard University, he is also a Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is on the adjunct faculty at Tokyo’s Showa Women’s University's Institute for Language and Culture, he is currently pursuing work in the future of real-time 3D computer graphics, virtual reality, augmented reality and telepresence for teaching. He currently runs the Visualization Research and Teaching Laboratory at Harvard and has served as the Lead Technical artist for the Giza 3D project at Harvard reconstructing the pyramids, temples and tombs on the Egyptian Giza Plateau in virtual reality. He is a past fellow at the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies and the Center for Creative Inquiry at Carnegie Mellon University. For more than 40 years he has applied his visualization skills to work in computer science, science education, archaeology and museology for some of the world’s leading museums and universities.

Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Admir Masic
Admir Masic

Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Admir Masic is an Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the MIT. He is also an archaeological materials faculty fellow for the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) at the Center for Materials Research in Archaeology and Ethnology (CMRAE) and founder of the MIT Refugee Action Hub (MIT ReACT). His research focuses on the development of high performance, in situ and multiscale characterization techniques to investigate complex biological and archaeological materials. His group explores ancient technologies as a source of inspiration for the development of a new generation of more durable and sustainable building materials. In 2019, Masic received the CEE Masheeh Excellence Teaching Award. From 2008-2015, Masic, was an independent group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interface in Potsdam, Germany. He completed his physical chemistry MS and PhD degrees at University of Turin.

Executive Director, Work of the Future Project
Lecturer (Urban Studies and Planning)

Elisabeth B. Reynolds

Executive Director, Work of the Future Project
Lecturer (Urban Studies and Planning)

Elisabeth B. Reynolds works on issues related to systems of innovation, regional economic development and industrial competitiveness. She has focused in particular on the theory and practice of cluster development and regional innovation systems and advises several organizations in this area. Her current research focuses on the pathways that U.S. entrepreneurial firms take in scaling production-related technologies, as well as advanced manufacturing, including the globalization of the biomanufacturing industry. She is a member of the Massachusetts Advanced Manufacturing Collaborative Executive Committee.

Before coming to MIT for her Ph.D., Reynolds was the Director of the City Advisory Practice at the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC), a non-profit founded by Professor Michael Porter focused on job and business growth in urban areas.

Reynolds has an A.B. from Harvard in Government and was the Fiske Scholar at Trinity College, Cambridge. She holds a MSc. from the University of Montreal in Economics and a Ph.D. from MIT in Urban and Regional Studies.

Assistant Director of User Services, Immersion Lab, MIT.nano

Megan Roberts
Megan Roberts

Assistant Director of User Services, Immersion Lab, MIT.nano

Dr. Megan Roberts is the Assistant Director of User Services of the Immersion Lab at MIT.nano, a central facility for multidimensional and interactive data visualization, including augmented and virtual reality. She has over 10 years experience designing devices, sensors, and materials that interface with the human body. Her research interests include medical technology and manufacturing. She previously worked at Medtronic designing implantable pacemakers.

5:05pm

Closing Remarks with 1-minute Poster Pitches
5:35pm

Poster Session with Networking Reception
6:20pm

Adjournment
  • Agenda
    8:30am

    Welcome Remarks

    Dean, MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

    Huttenlocher
    Daniel Huttenlocher

    Dean, MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

    Daniel Huttenlocher is the inaugural dean of the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing. He began his academic career at Cornell University in 1988, where he was a member of the computer science faculty. In 1998, he chaired the task force that led to the creation of Cornell’s interdisciplinary Faculty of Computing and Information Science, later serving as its dean starting in 2009. In 2012, he became the founding dean of the new Cornell Tech campus in New York City.

    Huttenlocher has extensive industry experience, having served as a scientist and lab director at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center for 12 years before leaving to help establish a financial technology startup, Intelligent Markets, in 2000.

    Huttenlocher’s research and scholarship in computer science is broad and interdisciplinary, spanning algorithms, social media, and computer vision. He has earned the Longuet-Higgins Award for Fundamental Advances in Computer Vision (2010), and various fellowships and awards from the National Science Foundation, the Association for Computing Machinery, IEEE, and Phi Beta Kappa.

    He is a member of the boards of directors of Amazon and Corning, and of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, where he has served as chair since 2018.

    Huttenlocher earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan in 1980, double-majoring in computer and communication sciences and experimental psychology. An MIT alumnus, he earned an SM in electrical engineering and computer science in 1984 and a PhD in computer science in 1988.

    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow
    Vladimir Bulovic
    Director, MIT.nano; Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Chair in Emerging Technology; Professor of Electrical Engineering, MacVicar Fellow

    Vladimir Bulović is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, holding the Fariborz Maseeh Chair in Emerging Technology.  He directs the Organic and Nanostructured Electronics Laboratory, co-leads the MIT-Eni Solar Frontiers Center, leads the Tata GridEdge program, and is the Founding Director of MIT.nano, MIT's new 200,000 sqft nano-fabrication, nano-characterization, and prototyping facility. He is an author of over 250 research articles (cited over 50,000 times and recognized as the top 1% of the most highly cited in the Web of Science). He is an inventor of over 100 U.S. patents in areas of light emitting diodes, lasers, photovoltaics, photodetectors, chemical sensors, programmable memories, and micro-electro machines, majority of which have been licensed and utilized by both start-up and multinational companies.  The three start-up companies Bulović co-founded jointly employ over 350 people, and include Ubiquitous Energy, Inc., developing nanostructured solar technologies, Kateeva, Inc., focused on development of printed electronics, and QD Vision, Inc. (acquired in 2016) that produced quantum dot optoelectronic components.  Products of these companies have been used by millions.  Bulović was the first Associate Dean for Innovation of the School of Engineering and the Inaugural co-Director of MIT’s Innovation Initiative, which he co-led from 2013 to 2018. For his passion for teaching Bulović has been recognized with the MacVicar Fellowship, MIT’s highest teaching honor.  He completed his Electrical Engineering B.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees at Princeton University.

    8:45am

    Morning Keynote
    Global CSO, NCSOFT
    Yoon
    Songyee Yoon
    Global CSO

    Dr. Songyee Yoon is an accomplished entrepreneur, innovator and investor, who is well-versed in both technology and business. She is currently serving as Chief Strategy Officer and president of NCSOFT, a global digital entertainment company and one of the leading video game publishers. She was instrumental in the establishment of the company and recently in foundation of the NCSOFT AI Center and Natural Language Processing Centers, advanced AI research facilities within NCSOFT created to help further the company’s use of AI and machine learning technology. Songyee was also the architect behind the introduction of the intelligent and personalized data services platform as well as the intelligent data services over mobile platforms for SK Telecom, the largest wireless service provider in South Korea. As a chairperson of the NCSOFT Culture Foundation, Songyee actively engages in diverse philanthropic initiatives, including sponsoring Special Olympics participants, collaborating with UN Food Programs and helping refugees through UNHCR. She has been recognized by various organizations for her leadership, which includes being named as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum, a Young Leader by the Boao Forum of China and one of the 50 Women to Watch in business by the Wall Street Journal. She is one of the founding members of FIRA Micro Robot Soccer Competition and a Ph.D. recipient from MIT in Computational Neuroscience based on her research at the MIT Media Lab. Songyee has served on the Presidential Advisory Council for Science and Technology for South Korea’s 16th president, Roh Moo-hyun and the 15th president, Kim Dae-jung. She taught Media and Entertainment Business Strategy as an adjunct professor at Yonsei University in Seoul, one of South Korea’s most prestigious learning institutions. She currently is a chairperson of the Asia Business Leaders Council of the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, an advisory board member for the RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy and a trustee of the MIT Corporation.


    Session 1: Interaction, Fabrication, and Transportation
    9:30am

    Session 1 Block Intro
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

    Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

    Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

    9:35am

    Director, Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE)
    Professor of Digital Media & AI

    Fox
    D. Fox Harrell

    Director, Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE)
    Professor of Digital Media & AI

    D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D., is Professor of Digital Media & Artificial Intelligence in the Comparative Media Studies Program and Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT. He is the director of the MIT Center for Advanced Virtuality. His research explores the relationship between imagination and computation and involves inventing new forms of VR, computational narrative, videogaming for social impact, and related digital media forms. The National Science Foundation has recognized Harrell with an NSF CAREER Award for his project “Computing for Advanced Identity Representation.” Dr. Harrell holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Cognitive Science from the University of California, San Diego. His other degrees include a Master’s degree in Interactive Telecommunication from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, and a B.S. in Logic and Computation and B.F.A. in Art (electronic and time-based media) from Carnegie Mellon University – each with highest honors. He has worked as an interactive television producer and as a game designer. His book Phantasmal Media: An Approach to Imagination, Computation, and Expression was published by the MIT Press (2013).

    The MIT Center for Advanced Virtuality (MIT Virtuality for short) pioneers innovative experiences using technologies of virtuality — computing systems that construct imaginative experiences atop our physical world. Our approach to engineering and creative practices pushes the expressive potential of technologies of virtuality and simulates social and cognitive phenomena, while intrinsically considering their social and cultural impacts. This talk focuses on an important aspect of such technologies: virtual selves. Indeed nearly early everyone these days uses virtual identities, ranging from accounts for social media and online shopping to avatars in videogames or virtual reality. Given the widespread and growing use of such technologies, it is important to better understand their impacts and to establish innovative and best practices. In this talk, Harrell explores how our social identities are complicated by their intersection with extended reality technologies, videogames, social media, and related digital media forms. With an emphasis on equity, Harrell will explore how virtual identities both implement and transform persistent issues of class, gender, sex, race, ethnicity, and the dynamically construction social categories more generally.

    9:50am

    High Resolution Tactile Sensing for HCI, Robotics and VR/AR

    Esther and Harold E Edgerton Career Development Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
    MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    Matusik
    Wojciech Matusik

    Esther and Harold E Edgerton Career Development Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
    MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    Wojciech Matusik is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT, where he leads the Computational Fabrication Group. Before coming to MIT, he worked at Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, Adobe Systems, and Disney Research Zurich. He studied computer graphics at MIT and received his PhD in 2003. He also received a BS in EECS from the University of California at Berkeley in 1997 and MS in EECS from MIT in 2001. His research interests are in direct digital manufacturing and computer graphics. In 2004, he was named one of the world's top 100 young innovators by MIT's Technology Review Magazine. In 2009, he received the Significant New Researcher Award from ACM Siggraph. In 2012, Matusik received the DARPA Young Faculty Award and he was named a Sloan Research Fellow.

    Humans can feel, weigh and grasp diverse objects, and simultaneously infer their material properties while applying the right amount of force—a challenging set of tasks for a modern robot. Mechanoreceptor networks that provide sensory feedback and enable the dexterity of the human grasp remain difficult to replicate in robots. Although computer-vision-based robot grasping strategies have progressed substantially, there are as yet no equivalent sensing platforms and large-scale datasets with which to probe the use of the tactile information that humans rely on when grasping objects.

    10:05am

    Challenges and opportunities in robotics: from self driving cars to the micro- and nano-scale?

    Samuel C Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
    Associate Head for Research, Mechanical Engineering
    Co-Director, Ford-MIT Alliance
    MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

    John Leonard

    Samuel C Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
    Associate Head for Research, Mechanical Engineering
    Co-Director, Ford-MIT Alliance
    MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

    John J. Leonard is Samuel C. Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering and Associate Department Head for Research in the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering. He is also a member of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). His research addresses the problems of navigation and mapping for autonomous mobile robots and underwater vehicles. He holds the degrees of B.S.E.E. in Electrical Engineering and Science from the University of Pennsylvania (1987) and D.Phil. in Engineering Science from the University of Oxford (1994). He was team leader for MIT's DARPA Urban Challenge team, which was one of eleven teams to qualify for the Urban Challenge final event and one of six teams to complete the race. He is the recipient of an NSF Career Award (1998) and the King-Sun Fu Memorial Best Transactions on Robotics Paper Award (2006). He is an IEEE Fellow (2014).

    We will briefly describe some of the challenges and opportunities in autonomous robotics, with a focus on self-driving cars. Some of the major challenges in include high-resolution 3D mapping, fusing data from multiple types of sensors, and achieving robust decision-making with uncertain perception data. We will also present some thoughts on applying some of the techniques used in self-driving, such as simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM), to micro- and nano-scale environments.

    10:20am

    Session 1 Panel with Q&A
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

    Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

    Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

    Director, Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE)
    Professor of Digital Media & AI

    Fox
    D. Fox Harrell

    Director, Imagination, Computation, and Expression Laboratory (ICE)
    Professor of Digital Media & AI

    D. Fox Harrell, Ph.D., is Professor of Digital Media & Artificial Intelligence in the Comparative Media Studies Program and Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT. He is the director of the MIT Center for Advanced Virtuality. His research explores the relationship between imagination and computation and involves inventing new forms of VR, computational narrative, videogaming for social impact, and related digital media forms. The National Science Foundation has recognized Harrell with an NSF CAREER Award for his project “Computing for Advanced Identity Representation.” Dr. Harrell holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Cognitive Science from the University of California, San Diego. His other degrees include a Master’s degree in Interactive Telecommunication from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, and a B.S. in Logic and Computation and B.F.A. in Art (electronic and time-based media) from Carnegie Mellon University – each with highest honors. He has worked as an interactive television producer and as a game designer. His book Phantasmal Media: An Approach to Imagination, Computation, and Expression was published by the MIT Press (2013).

    Samuel C Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
    Associate Head for Research, Mechanical Engineering
    Co-Director, Ford-MIT Alliance
    MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

    John Leonard

    Samuel C Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
    Associate Head for Research, Mechanical Engineering
    Co-Director, Ford-MIT Alliance
    MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering

    John J. Leonard is Samuel C. Collins Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering and Associate Department Head for Research in the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering. He is also a member of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). His research addresses the problems of navigation and mapping for autonomous mobile robots and underwater vehicles. He holds the degrees of B.S.E.E. in Electrical Engineering and Science from the University of Pennsylvania (1987) and D.Phil. in Engineering Science from the University of Oxford (1994). He was team leader for MIT's DARPA Urban Challenge team, which was one of eleven teams to qualify for the Urban Challenge final event and one of six teams to complete the race. He is the recipient of an NSF Career Award (1998) and the King-Sun Fu Memorial Best Transactions on Robotics Paper Award (2006). He is an IEEE Fellow (2014).


    Session 2: Motion, Manipulation, and Sound
    10:50am

    Session 2 Block Intro

    Director Transmedia Storytelling Initiative
    Professor Department of Architecture

    Caroline Jones
    Caroline Jones

    Director Transmedia Storytelling Initiative
    Professor Department of Architecture

    Caroline A. Jones is Professor in the History, Theory, Criticism section of the Department of Architecture at MIT. She studies modern and contemporary art, with a particular focus on its technological modes of production, distribution, and reception, and on its interface with sciences such as physics, neuroscience, and biology. Jones has also worked as a curator, notably at MIT’s List Visual Art Center: Sensorium (2006), Video Trajectories (2007), and Hans Haacke 1967 (2011). Her publications include Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist (1996/98, winner of the Charles Eldredge prize), Picturing Science, Producing Art (co-edited, 1998), Sensorium: embodied experience, technology, and contemporary art (as editor, 2006), Eyesight Alone: Clement Greenberg’s Modernism and the Bureaucratization of the Senses (2005/08), Experience: Culture, Cognition, and the Common Sense (co-edited, 2016), and The Global Work of Art (2016). Her current research collaboration with historian of science Peter Galison examines patterns of occlusion and political contestation in seeing and unseeing the Anthropocene; she is also working on practices and histories of “bio art.”

    10:55am

    In-Home Wireless Health Monitoring: From Wearables to Invisibles

    Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
    Director, Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT)
    MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    Dina
    Dina Katabi

    Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
    Director, Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT)
    MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    Dina Katabi is the Andrew & Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and the director of MIT’s Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT). Katabi is also a MacArthur Fellow and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. She received her PhD and MS from MIT and her BS from Damascus University. Katabi has received the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award, the Faculty Research Innovation Fellowship, the Sloan Fellowship, the NBX Career Development chair, and the NSF CAREER award. Katabi's doctoral dissertation won an ACM Honorable Mention award and a Sprowls award for academic excellence. Further, her work was recognized by the IEEE William R. Bennett prize, three ACM SIGCOMM Best Paper awards, an NSDI Best Paper award, the SIGCOMM Test-of-Time award, and a TR10 award for her work on the sparse Fourier transform. Several start-ups have been spun out of Katabi's lab, such as PiCharging and Emerald.

    This talk discusses advances in wireless sensing that allow for monitoring people’s movements, gait, falls, sleep patterns, breathing, and heart rate, all without putting any sensor on the person. The new technology can even see people’s movements through walls and occlusions. The device transmits a low power radio signal (1000 times less power than WiFi) and analyses the interaction of the signal with the human body to derive precise information about a person’s location, movement, and physiological characteristics. A key challenge in realizing this technology is that radio signals interact with essentially everything in the environment. Any attempt to monitor a person has to somehow identify and isolate relevant information from pervasive interference and extraneous reflections from objects in the environment. We overcome this challenge using an interdisciplinary approach that combines innovations in signal processing, machine learning, and wireless systems.

    11:25am

    Immersive Sound and the Curvature of Social Space-Time: Using Spatial Audio for Learning, Art, and Democracy

    Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies
    MIT Anthropology

    Condry
    Ian Condry

    Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies
    MIT Anthropology

    Ian Condry is a cultural anthropologist in the department of Comparative Media Studies / Writing at MIT, where he has been teaching since 2002. He is the author of two books, The Soul of Anime and Hip-Hop Japan, both of which analyze how cultural movements go global from below. He is the founder of the MIT Spatial Sound Lab which is part of a larger project called Dissolve Music, bringing together sound artists, musicians, educators, and technologists to explore the transformative potential of sound for learning, democracy, and the arts.

    What if, instead of screens on our heads, we imagined immersive experiences in terms of 360-degree sound in open spaces? How can developments in spatial audio transform our understandings of sound, learning and democracy? How can we learn from the sociality of musical experiences to deepen our approaches to education, research, and the arts?

    11:40am

    Session 2 Panel with Q&A

    Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
    Director, Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT)
    MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    Dina
    Dina Katabi

    Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
    Director, Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT)
    MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    Dina Katabi is the Andrew & Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and the director of MIT’s Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT). Katabi is also a MacArthur Fellow and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. She received her PhD and MS from MIT and her BS from Damascus University. Katabi has received the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award, the Faculty Research Innovation Fellowship, the Sloan Fellowship, the NBX Career Development chair, and the NSF CAREER award. Katabi's doctoral dissertation won an ACM Honorable Mention award and a Sprowls award for academic excellence. Further, her work was recognized by the IEEE William R. Bennett prize, three ACM SIGCOMM Best Paper awards, an NSDI Best Paper award, the SIGCOMM Test-of-Time award, and a TR10 award for her work on the sparse Fourier transform. Several start-ups have been spun out of Katabi's lab, such as PiCharging and Emerald.

    Class of 1957 Associate Professor
    Mechanical Engineering Department
    Rodriguez
    Alberto Rodriguez
    Class of 1957 Associate Professor
    Mechanical Engineering Department

    Alberto Rodriguez is the Class of 1957 Associate Professor at the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT. Alberto graduated in Mathematics ('05) and Telecommunication Engineering ('06) from the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, and earned his PhD (’13) from the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He leads the Manipulation and Mechanisms Lab at MIT (MCube) researching autonomous dexterous manipulation, robot automation, and end-effector design. Alberto has received Best Paper Awards at conferences RSS’11, ICRA’13, RSS’18, IROS'18, and RSS'19, the 2018 Best Manipulation System Paper Award from Amazon, and has been finalist for best paper awards at IROS’16, IROS'18, ICRA'20 and RSS'20. He has led Team MIT-Princeton in the Amazon Robotics Challenge between 2015 and 2017, and has received Faculty Research Awards from Amazon in 2018, 2019 and 2020, and from Google in 2020. He is also the recipient of the 2020 IEEE Early Academic Career Award in Robotics and Automation. 

    Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies
    MIT Anthropology

    Condry
    Ian Condry

    Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies
    MIT Anthropology

    Ian Condry is a cultural anthropologist in the department of Comparative Media Studies / Writing at MIT, where he has been teaching since 2002. He is the author of two books, The Soul of Anime and Hip-Hop Japan, both of which analyze how cultural movements go global from below. He is the founder of the MIT Spatial Sound Lab which is part of a larger project called Dissolve Music, bringing together sound artists, musicians, educators, and technologists to explore the transformative potential of sound for learning, democracy, and the arts.

    Director Transmedia Storytelling Initiative
    Professor Department of Architecture

    Caroline Jones
    Caroline Jones

    Director Transmedia Storytelling Initiative
    Professor Department of Architecture

    Caroline A. Jones is Professor in the History, Theory, Criticism section of the Department of Architecture at MIT. She studies modern and contemporary art, with a particular focus on its technological modes of production, distribution, and reception, and on its interface with sciences such as physics, neuroscience, and biology. Jones has also worked as a curator, notably at MIT’s List Visual Art Center: Sensorium (2006), Video Trajectories (2007), and Hans Haacke 1967 (2011). Her publications include Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist (1996/98, winner of the Charles Eldredge prize), Picturing Science, Producing Art (co-edited, 1998), Sensorium: embodied experience, technology, and contemporary art (as editor, 2006), Eyesight Alone: Clement Greenberg’s Modernism and the Bureaucratization of the Senses (2005/08), Experience: Culture, Cognition, and the Common Sense (co-edited, 2016), and The Global Work of Art (2016). Her current research collaboration with historian of science Peter Galison examines patterns of occlusion and political contestation in seeing and unseeing the Anthropocene; she is also working on practices and histories of “bio art.”


    Session 3: MIT ILP and the Startup Exchange
    11:55am

    Introduction to the MIT Industrial Liaison Program
    Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Director, Alliance Management
    MIT Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer
    Karl Koster, Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Karl Koster
    Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Director, Alliance Management
    MIT Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer

    Karl Koster is the Executive Director of MIT Corporate Relations. MIT Corporate Relations includes the MIT Industrial Liaison Program and MIT Startup Exchange.

    In that capacity, Koster and his staff work with the leadership of MIT and senior corporate executives to design and implement strategies for fostering corporate partnerships with the Institute. Koster and his team have also worked to identify and design a number of major international programs for MIT, which have been characterized by the establishment of strong, programmatic linkages among universities, industry, and governments. Most recently these efforts have been extended to engage the surrounding innovation ecosystem, including its vibrant startup and small company community, into MIT's global corporate and university networks.

    Koster is also the Director of Alliance Management in the Office of Strategic Alliances and Technology Transfer (OSATT). OSATT was launched in Fall 2019 as part of a plan to reinvent MIT’s research administration infrastructure. OSATT develops agreements that facilitate MIT projects, programs and consortia with industrial, nonprofit, and international sponsors, partners and collaborators.

    He is past chairman of the University-Industry Demonstration Partnership (UIDP), an organization that seeks to enhance the value of collaborative partnerships between universities and corporations.

    He graduated from Brown University with a BA in geology and economics, and received an MS from MIT Sloan School of Management. Prior to returning to MIT, Koster worked as a management consultant in Europe, Latin America, and the United States on projects for private and public sector organizations.

    12:05pm

    Startup Exchange: Overview and Lightning Talks

    Program Director, MIT Startup Exchange

    Dahllof
    Marcus Dahllöf

    Program Director, MIT Startup Exchange

    Marcus Dahllöf leads MIT Startup Exchange, which facilitates connections between MIT-connected startups and corporate members of the MIT Industrial Liaison Program (ILP). Dahllöf manages networking events, workshops, the STEX25 accelerator, opportunity postings, and helps define the strategic direction of MIT Startup Exchange. He is a two-time tech entrepreneur (one exit in cybersecurity), and has previously held roles in finance, software engineering, corporate strategy, and business development at emerging tech companies and Fortune 100 corporations in the U.S., Latin America, and Europe. Marcus was a member of the Swedish national rowing team and he is a mentor at the MIT Venture Mentoring Service.

    Cofounder & CEO, iQ3Connect
    Merchant
    Ali Merchant
    Cofounder & CEO

    Ali Merchant is the cofounder and CEO of iQ3Connect. He has more than 10 years of experience with the computational methods and application of design methodologies in the aerospace industry. Merchant has worked with major US engine manufacturers, NASA, and DoD on advanced research projects. He holds a Masters and PhD from the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT.

    Founder & CEO, Prescient Devices
    Andy Wang
    Andy Wang
    Founder & CEO

    Andy Wang is the founder and CEO of Prescient Devices, Inc., an MIT startup pioneering design automation technology for distributed and fragmented IoT systems. Wang was the cofounder and CTO of GTI IoT Technology, a leading supplier of low-power wireless IoT solutions, where he helped grow GTI from a two-person founding team to a profitable company with 150+ employees. Prior to GTI, he was a senior design engineer at Analog Devices, where he developed high-speed integrated circuits and systems. Wang graduated with a PhD degree from MIT.

    Cofounder & CEO, Inkbit
    Marini
    Davide Marini
    Cofounder & CEO

    Davide Marini is cofounder and CEO of Inkbit, an MIT startup pioneering the use of machine vision in 3D printing. Prior to Inkbit, Marini was CEO of Firefly BioWorks, an MIT startup that developed a new microfabrication technology by combining photolithography with microfluidics. Firefly’s first product allowed multiplexed detection of cellular and circulating microRNAs on standard flow cytometers. The company was acquired by Abcam. Marini holds a BS in industrial engineering from Politecnico of Milan and a PhD in mechanical engineering from MIT.

    Founder & CEO, NODAR
    Jiang
    Leaf Jiang
    Founder & CEO

    Leaf Jiang, CEO and Founder of NODAR Inc., has founded two successful high-tech companies that have generated positive revenue and whose products have earned R&D100 Magazine Awards and InnoCentive Challenge Awards. Jiang is an expert in LIDAR, has published extensively in the field at MIT Lincoln Laboratory for 12 years, and has a PhD in electrical engineering and computer science from MIT.

    Founder & CEO, Spectrohm
    Cargol
    Tim Cargol
    Founder & CEO

    Tim Cargol earned his BS and M.Eng degrees in electrical engineering from MIT and founded his first startup out of MIT’s High Voltage Research Laboratory in 2002. After inventing radio-frequency based internal imaging, Cargol left a career in the US Federal Government in 2018 to found Spectrohm and commercialize the technology.

    Cofounder, CEO & CTO, Hosta Labs
    Villalon
    Rachelle Villalon
    Cofounder, CEO & CTO

    Rachelle Villalon holds a PhD in architecture and computer science from MIT. Prior to this, she worked as head of R&D for Gehry Technologies. Villalon is the brain behind Hosta Labs technology -- a novel, patent-pending technology that captures dimensions and respective objects from just a single photo of an existing space. There are only a handful of students every year that graduate in the space of technology and architecture, and this unique knowledge drives Villalon to develop novel solutions for old problems in the build environment.

    Co-Founder & CTO, GelSight
    Janos Rohaly
    Janos Rohaly
    Co-Founder & CTO

    János Rohaly is a hands-on high-tech entrepreneur with experience in building successful businesses and creating game changing imaging products out of a research idea. He co-founded Brontes Technologies, Inc. in 2003 while he was a Research Scientist at the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT. As co-inventor of the core technology and Chief Scientist of Brontes Technologies he led the technology commercialization effort to create the world's first real time, intraoral, 3-D imaging device that replaced traditional paste-based impressions in dentistry and orthodontics. Brontes was acquired by 3M in 2006 delivering an 8X return to the investors. After the acquisition János stayed on board with 3M for 5 years as Chief Scientist of the newly created Digital Oral Care Department. He holds a doctorate degree in optical diagnostics in fluids from Kobe University in Japan, and an M.Sc. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University of Budapest in Hungary. János has fifteen patents spanning the space of novel optics and algorithms in the field of three-dimensional imaging.

    iQ3Connect: VR platform for collaboration
    Prescient Devices: Design automation for IoT
    Inkbit: 3D printing powered by machine vision (ocular sensors) and AI
    NODAR: Next-gen LiDAR 3D sensors
    Spectrohm: Imaging deep inside objects with radio waves
    Hosta Labs: Sensing to generate 3D maps of building interiors
    GelSight: Handheld sensor for topography
     



    MIT Startup Exchange actively promotes collaboration and partnerships between MIT-connected startups and industry. Qualified startups are those founded and/or led by MIT faculty, staff, or alumni, or are based on MIT-licensed technology. Industry participants are principally members of MIT’s Industrial Liaison Program (ILP).

    MIT Startup Exchange maintains a propriety database of over 1,500 MIT-connected startups with roots across MIT departments, labs and centers; it hosts a robust schedule of startup workshops and showcases, and facilitates networking and introductions between startups and corporate executives.

    STEX25 is a startup accelerator within MIT Startup Exchange, featuring 25 “industry ready” startups that have proven to be exceptional with early use cases, clients, demos, or partnerships, and are poised for significant growth. STEX25 startups receive promotion, travel, and advisory support, and are prioritized for meetings with ILP’s 230 member companies.

    MIT Startup Exchange and ILP are integrated programs of MIT Corporate Relations.

    12:35pm

    Networking Lunch with Startup Exhibit
    1:50pm

    Afternoon Keynote: Dow Chemical
    Global Operations Technology Director, The Dow Chemical Company
    Bardin
    Billy Bardin
    Global Operations Technology Director

    Billy B. Bardin is the Global Operations Technology Director for Dow. His responsibilities include driving technology and innovation strategy within Manufacturing and Engineering (M&E) and oversight of all commercial technologies as well as development of technical talent across manufacturing and supporting operations.

    Bardin began his career in 2000 with Union Carbide/Dow in the Catalyst Skill Center in South Charleston, WV, where he led alternative feedstock and catalytic process development programs. In 2001, he joined the Chemicals Sciences group within Core R&D, leading programs in the areas of alternative feedstocks, paraffin functionalization, and olefin partial oxidation. While in Chemical Sciences, Bardin relocated to Dow facilities in Midland, MI; Horgen, Switzerland; and Terneuzen, The Netherlands as leader for the development of Dow’s high throughput heterogeneous catalyst testing capability.

    In 2007, Bardin was named leader for the North American Production Support Group within the Hydrocarbons and Energy business in Freeport, TX. He led efforts in cracker plant support and developed R&D programs in next generation cracker technology. The following year, he accepted the combined role of R&D Director for Chemicals and The Dow Technology Licensing and Catalyst (DTLC) Business where he drove both internal R&D programs and technology/catalyst development efforts for licensee sales. In 2010, Bardin became R&D Director for the Feedstocks, Hydrocarbons and Chemicals businesses, leading the technology strategy for Dow’s hydrocarbons and alternative feedstock efforts and developing options to provide cost advantaged chemical feedstocks to Dow’s downstream product portfolio. Bardin was named to his current position in 2014.

    Bardin holds a BS in chemical engineering from North Carolina State University and an MS and PhD in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia. He is a Registered, Professional Engineer (PE) with the WV State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers. Bardin is past Chair of the Industrial Advisory Board for the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University and a member of the advisory boards for the Departments of Chemical Engineering at the University of Virginia and North Carolina State University. He was elected to the Board of Directors for the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) in 2016. He is also a Fellow of the AIChE and holds board seats for the MxD and RAPID manufacturing institutes.


    Session 4: Stories, History, and Augmentation
    2:35pm

    Egyptian Blue: the Antiquity-inspired Innovation

    Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Admir Masic
    Admir Masic

    Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Admir Masic is an Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the MIT. He is also an archaeological materials faculty fellow for the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) at the Center for Materials Research in Archaeology and Ethnology (CMRAE) and founder of the MIT Refugee Action Hub (MIT ReACT). His research focuses on the development of high performance, in situ and multiscale characterization techniques to investigate complex biological and archaeological materials. His group explores ancient technologies as a source of inspiration for the development of a new generation of more durable and sustainable building materials. In 2019, Masic received the CEE Masheeh Excellence Teaching Award. From 2008-2015, Masic, was an independent group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interface in Potsdam, Germany. He completed his physical chemistry MS and PhD degrees at University of Turin.

    In the first century BCE, Roman architect and engineer Vitruvius described how to produce the first artificial pigment known as Egyptian blue. Recently discovered optical properties of Egyptian blue point towards alternative applications in the various fields such as biomedicine, sensing, solar energy, nanotech, etc. This talk weaves together history, engineering, science, and modern technologies, to describe how we can harness remarkable properties associated with light scattering and durability of the Egyptian blue in the design of modern solutions. I will also describe current work on virtual representations of historical objects through augmented reality.

    2:50pm

    Photo-Chromeleon: Re-Programmable Multi-Color Textures Using Photochromic Dyes

    Postdoctoral Associate at HCI Engineering Group
    CSAIL, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Wessely
    Michael Wessely

    Postdoctoral Associate at HCI Engineering Group
    CSAIL, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Michael Wessely (michaelwessely.com) is a postdoctoral researcher working with Prof. Stefanie Mueller in the HCIE group at MIT CSAIL. He holds a PhD from Université Paris-Saclay, France and a Master’s degree from Saarland University, Germany. His PhD thesis bridges the gap between material science and human-computer interaction and his work has received two ACM UIST best paper awards. His current research focuses on developing interaction-aware materials that can change shape and color, and scale from small prototypes to interactive architecture.

    In this talk, I present a method to create re-programmable multi-color textures that are made from a single material only. The key idea builds on the use of photochromic inks that can switch their appearance from transparent to colored when exposed to light of a certain wavelength. By mixing cyan, magenta, and yellow (CMY) photochromic dyes into a single solution and leveraging the different absorption spectra of each dye, we can control each color channel in the solution separately. Our approach can transform single-material fabrication techniques, such as coating, into high-resolution multi-color processes.

    I discuss the material mixing procedure, modifications to the light source, and the algorithm to control each color channel. I then show the results from an experiment in which we evaluated the available color space and the resolution of our textures. Finally, I demonstrate our user interface that allows users to transfer virtual textures onto physical objects and show a range of application examples.

    3:05pm

    Introducing the MIT.nano Immersion Lab
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

    Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

    Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

    In this talk I will highlight the new infrastructure and support on campus which enables the use and study of AR/VR in manufacturing, in data visualization, in human health, in education, and more.

    3:20pm

    Break

    Session 5: Sensing, Society, and Technology
    3:35pm

    Panel Discussion
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

    Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and sensory systems Beyond IoT.

    Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

    Clarence J. LeBel Professor,
    Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

    Duane Boning
    Duane Boning

    Clarence J. LeBel Professor,
    Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT

    Duane S. Boning is Professor of Electrical Engineering and Comput¬er Science at MIT, where he holds the Clarence J. LeBel chair. He is affiliated with the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories, where he serves as Associate Director for Computation and CAD. He also serves as Co-Director of the MIT Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) dual MBA/Engineering Master’s degree program. He received SB, SM, and PhD degrees in electri¬cal engineering and computer science from MIT. From 1991 to 1993 he was a Member Technical Staff at the Texas Instruments Semiconductor Process and Design Center in Dal¬las, Texas, before returning to MIT to join the EECS faculty.

    At MIT, he served as Associate Head for Electrical Engineering in the EECS Department from 2004 to 2011, as Director of the MIT-Masdar Institute Cooperative Program from 2011 to 2018, and as Faculty Lead of the MIT-Skoltech Initiative from 2011 through 2013. From July 2019 to June 2021 he is Associate Chair of the MIT Faculty. Dr. Boning is a Fellow of the IEEE, and was Editor in Chief for the IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing from 2001 to 2011. His research interests include statistical and machine learning methods for the modeling and control of variation in IC and photonics process¬es, devices, and circuits. Particular emphases includes modeling of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), plasma etch, and embossing processes; and design for manufacturing (DFM) in IC and photonic technologies. He is co-editor of the book Machine Learning in VLSI Computer-Aided Design (Springer 2019).

    Director, Visualization Research and Teaching Laboratory, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University
    Gant
    Rus Gant
    Director, Visualization Research and Teaching Laboratory

    Rus Gant is a well-regarded international 3D artist, computer engineer and educator. He is currently on the Research staff at Harvard University, he is also a Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is on the adjunct faculty at Tokyo’s Showa Women’s University's Institute for Language and Culture, he is currently pursuing work in the future of real-time 3D computer graphics, virtual reality, augmented reality and telepresence for teaching. He currently runs the Visualization Research and Teaching Laboratory at Harvard and has served as the Lead Technical artist for the Giza 3D project at Harvard reconstructing the pyramids, temples and tombs on the Egyptian Giza Plateau in virtual reality. He is a past fellow at the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies and the Center for Creative Inquiry at Carnegie Mellon University. For more than 40 years he has applied his visualization skills to work in computer science, science education, archaeology and museology for some of the world’s leading museums and universities.

    Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Admir Masic
    Admir Masic

    Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Admir Masic is an Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) at the MIT. He is also an archaeological materials faculty fellow for the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) at the Center for Materials Research in Archaeology and Ethnology (CMRAE) and founder of the MIT Refugee Action Hub (MIT ReACT). His research focuses on the development of high performance, in situ and multiscale characterization techniques to investigate complex biological and archaeological materials. His group explores ancient technologies as a source of inspiration for the development of a new generation of more durable and sustainable building materials. In 2019, Masic received the CEE Masheeh Excellence Teaching Award. From 2008-2015, Masic, was an independent group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interface in Potsdam, Germany. He completed his physical chemistry MS and PhD degrees at University of Turin.

    Executive Director, Work of the Future Project
    Lecturer (Urban Studies and Planning)

    Elisabeth B. Reynolds

    Executive Director, Work of the Future Project
    Lecturer (Urban Studies and Planning)

    Elisabeth B. Reynolds works on issues related to systems of innovation, regional economic development and industrial competitiveness. She has focused in particular on the theory and practice of cluster development and regional innovation systems and advises several organizations in this area. Her current research focuses on the pathways that U.S. entrepreneurial firms take in scaling production-related technologies, as well as advanced manufacturing, including the globalization of the biomanufacturing industry. She is a member of the Massachusetts Advanced Manufacturing Collaborative Executive Committee.

    Before coming to MIT for her Ph.D., Reynolds was the Director of the City Advisory Practice at the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC), a non-profit founded by Professor Michael Porter focused on job and business growth in urban areas.

    Reynolds has an A.B. from Harvard in Government and was the Fiske Scholar at Trinity College, Cambridge. She holds a MSc. from the University of Montreal in Economics and a Ph.D. from MIT in Urban and Regional Studies.

    Assistant Director of User Services, Immersion Lab, MIT.nano

    Megan Roberts
    Megan Roberts

    Assistant Director of User Services, Immersion Lab, MIT.nano

    Dr. Megan Roberts is the Assistant Director of User Services of the Immersion Lab at MIT.nano, a central facility for multidimensional and interactive data visualization, including augmented and virtual reality. She has over 10 years experience designing devices, sensors, and materials that interface with the human body. Her research interests include medical technology and manufacturing. She previously worked at Medtronic designing implantable pacemakers.

    5:05pm

    Closing Remarks with 1-minute Poster Pitches
    5:35pm

    Poster Session with Networking Reception
    6:20pm

    Adjournment