Hacking Healthcare Transformation with Digital Technology + Open Innovation

December 14, 2020
Hacking Healthcare Transformation with Digital Technology + Open Innovation
Webinar


Location

Zoom Webinar

Education Partner

MIT Professional Education log

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Overview

Healthcare’s tectonic shifts are forcing fundamental business model change to every one of it’s players, both in the United States and globally.  Medical and health technology — for decades derided as the driver of increased health costs — are now the key enabler of new products, re-imagined services and new business models to extend the reach and impact of healthcare. Digital tech and the telemedicine enabled by it have proven that health systems can bend the cost curve and accomplish the “Triple Aim” of increased access, better outcomes and lower costs with:

• New sensors and biometrics

• Connected medical devices

• Companion apps to therapeutics

• Re-designed care delivery models

• New business models

• Digiceuticals + Electroceuticals that compliment or replace traditional pharmaceuticals

 

Over the past decade, MIT Hacking Medicine has pioneered open innovation events we call healthcare hackathons far beyond Cambridge to over 90 events in 30 countries, bringing a repeatable process and tools for identifying big healthcare problems and catalyzing new solutions and care models using technology to scale medicine. Example event themes and impact over the years:

• Hacking Oncology

• Hacking Pediatrics

• Hacking Cardiology

• Hacking Dermatology

• Hacking Primary Care

• Hacking Portable Ultrasound

• Hacking the Breast Pump

• Hacking Medical Imaging

• Hacking Mental Health Interventions

• Hacking Aging In Place and Eldercare

• Hacking Rural Care in the United States

• Hacking Village Care in India

• Hacking Racism in Public Health

• Hacking COVID-19

• Dozens of startups have raised over $250MM in venture capital funding

 

MIT Hacking Medicine co-founder and Faculty Director, Zen Chu, will describe what we have learned over the past decade with examples and best practices. He also will discuss the role corporations have played in those events and how companies can leverage hackathons for sourcing ideas and identify new technologies relevant to their business.

  • Overview

    Healthcare’s tectonic shifts are forcing fundamental business model change to every one of it’s players, both in the United States and globally.  Medical and health technology — for decades derided as the driver of increased health costs — are now the key enabler of new products, re-imagined services and new business models to extend the reach and impact of healthcare. Digital tech and the telemedicine enabled by it have proven that health systems can bend the cost curve and accomplish the “Triple Aim” of increased access, better outcomes and lower costs with:

    • New sensors and biometrics

    • Connected medical devices

    • Companion apps to therapeutics

    • Re-designed care delivery models

    • New business models

    • Digiceuticals + Electroceuticals that compliment or replace traditional pharmaceuticals

     

    Over the past decade, MIT Hacking Medicine has pioneered open innovation events we call healthcare hackathons far beyond Cambridge to over 90 events in 30 countries, bringing a repeatable process and tools for identifying big healthcare problems and catalyzing new solutions and care models using technology to scale medicine. Example event themes and impact over the years:

    • Hacking Oncology

    • Hacking Pediatrics

    • Hacking Cardiology

    • Hacking Dermatology

    • Hacking Primary Care

    • Hacking Portable Ultrasound

    • Hacking the Breast Pump

    • Hacking Medical Imaging

    • Hacking Mental Health Interventions

    • Hacking Aging In Place and Eldercare

    • Hacking Rural Care in the United States

    • Hacking Village Care in India

    • Hacking Racism in Public Health

    • Hacking COVID-19

    • Dozens of startups have raised over $250MM in venture capital funding

     

    MIT Hacking Medicine co-founder and Faculty Director, Zen Chu, will describe what we have learned over the past decade with examples and best practices. He also will discuss the role corporations have played in those events and how companies can leverage hackathons for sourcing ideas and identify new technologies relevant to their business.

Register

Agenda

11:00am - 11:20am

Hacking Healthcare Transformation with Digital Technology + Open Innovation
Co-Founder and Faculty Director, MIT Hacking Medicine
Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management
Zen Chu
Co-Founder and Faculty Director, MIT Hacking Medicine
Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management

Zen Chu created the MIT Healthcare Ventures graduate courses within MIT’s Health Science & Technology (HST) program. Chu specializes in building early-stage medical technology and healthcare service companies, usually serving as cofounder and first investor, and his portfolio spans Boston, Silicon Valley, and China. He has managed and led new ventures for Harvard Medical School, Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Bioengineering, NetVentures, and Hewlett-Packard. Chu earned a master’s in public and private management from Yale University and a BS in biomedical/electrical engineering from SMU.

11:20am - 11:50am

Q&A
11:50am - 12:30pm

ILP Member Discussions with Zen Chu
  • Agenda
    11:00am - 11:20am

    Hacking Healthcare Transformation with Digital Technology + Open Innovation
    Co-Founder and Faculty Director, MIT Hacking Medicine
    Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management
    Zen Chu
    Co-Founder and Faculty Director, MIT Hacking Medicine
    Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management

    Zen Chu created the MIT Healthcare Ventures graduate courses within MIT’s Health Science & Technology (HST) program. Chu specializes in building early-stage medical technology and healthcare service companies, usually serving as cofounder and first investor, and his portfolio spans Boston, Silicon Valley, and China. He has managed and led new ventures for Harvard Medical School, Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Bioengineering, NetVentures, and Hewlett-Packard. Chu earned a master’s in public and private management from Yale University and a BS in biomedical/electrical engineering from SMU.

    11:20am - 11:50am

    Q&A
    11:50am - 12:30pm

    ILP Member Discussions with Zen Chu