Past Event

2022 MIT Japan Virtual Conference

January 13, 2022 - January 28, 2022
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM (JST UTC+9)
2022 MIT Japan Virtual Conference
Webinar

Location

Webinar

Overview

The 2022 MIT Japan Conference will feature presentations by leading MIT faculty in the areas of computing, quantum systems, smart homes, nano and sustainable materials, bio-electronics and sensing platforms. It will also include presentations by MIT Startup Exchange entrepreneurs, including the accelerator STEX25, to showcase their exciting and innovative technologies applicable to a wide set of industries. 

The conference will be divided into 6 webinars, held on January 13, 14, 20, 21, 27, and 28, starting at 9am Tokyo time. Webinars will consist of talks by MIT faculty and MIT startup speakers, with time for Q&A following each talk. Opportunities for one-on-one meetings with MIT-connected startups will be available on January 27th. Please contact your ILP Program Director to participate.

General topical areas for each day will be:

Jan. 13 (Thursday):  Future Perspectives on Computing and Urban Design

Jan. 14 (Friday):  Nano and Sustainable Materials

Jan. 20 (Thursday): MIT Startup Exchange Presentations

Jan. 21 (Friday):  Bio-Electronics and Sensing

Jan. 27  (Thursday):  One-on-one meetings between ILP members and MIT-connected startups (prior sign-up required)

Jan. 28 (Friday):  Quantum Systems and Smart Homes


ALL DATES/ TIMES LISTED BELOW ARE JAPAN STANDARD TIME (U.S. EASTERN STANDARD TIME +14)


同時通訳サービス (Simultaneous Translation Service)

We are offering Zoom based simultaneous translation service for this conference. 

In order to use simultaneous translation feature during Zoom webinar, you will need the version of Zoom that is higher than version 5.2.1. If you do not already have this version, please update your Zoom client/application before joining the discussionFollow the instructions here to update Zoom.

Please visit Language interpretation in meetings and webinars on Zoom for more details.

  • Overview

    The 2022 MIT Japan Conference will feature presentations by leading MIT faculty in the areas of computing, quantum systems, smart homes, nano and sustainable materials, bio-electronics and sensing platforms. It will also include presentations by MIT Startup Exchange entrepreneurs, including the accelerator STEX25, to showcase their exciting and innovative technologies applicable to a wide set of industries. 

    The conference will be divided into 6 webinars, held on January 13, 14, 20, 21, 27, and 28, starting at 9am Tokyo time. Webinars will consist of talks by MIT faculty and MIT startup speakers, with time for Q&A following each talk. Opportunities for one-on-one meetings with MIT-connected startups will be available on January 27th. Please contact your ILP Program Director to participate.

    General topical areas for each day will be:

    Jan. 13 (Thursday):  Future Perspectives on Computing and Urban Design

    Jan. 14 (Friday):  Nano and Sustainable Materials

    Jan. 20 (Thursday): MIT Startup Exchange Presentations

    Jan. 21 (Friday):  Bio-Electronics and Sensing

    Jan. 27  (Thursday):  One-on-one meetings between ILP members and MIT-connected startups (prior sign-up required)

    Jan. 28 (Friday):  Quantum Systems and Smart Homes


    ALL DATES/ TIMES LISTED BELOW ARE JAPAN STANDARD TIME (U.S. EASTERN STANDARD TIME +14)


    同時通訳サービス (Simultaneous Translation Service)

    We are offering Zoom based simultaneous translation service for this conference. 

    In order to use simultaneous translation feature during Zoom webinar, you will need the version of Zoom that is higher than version 5.2.1. If you do not already have this version, please update your Zoom client/application before joining the discussionFollow the instructions here to update Zoom.

    Please visit Language interpretation in meetings and webinars on Zoom for more details.


Agenda

  • DAY 1: Jan. 13 (Thu) Future Perspectives on Computing and Urban Design
    9:00 AM - 9:05 AM

    Welcome and Introduction
    Senior Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Director, MIT-ILP, Japan
    Gregory Ornatowski
    Senior Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Director, MIT-ILP, Japan

    Dr. Ornatowski is currently a Senior Director in the Office of Corporate Relations (OCR) at MIT and the Director, MIT-ILP, Japan. He works with various companies in the automotive, electronics and materials industries. Prior to joining MIT, he worked as a consultant in the Boston area with Standard and Poor's DRI and Harbor Research.

    Previously he spent nine years with General Electric, where he held various management positions in business development, strategic planning and marketing in the U.S. and Asia and worked with several of GE's technology-focused businesses. Dr. Ornatowski began his professional career as a management consultant working with the Tokyo office of the Boston Consulting Group.

    In addition to his corporate experience, Dr. Ornatowski has taught at the MIT Sloan School of Management, Boston University, and Trinity College. He has also published articles in the Sloan Management Review, Far Eastern Economic Review, The Journal of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan, and the Journal of Socio-Economics. He is fluent in Japanese, having lived and worked in Japan a total of 12 years, and has worked extensively with Asian and European companies as well.

    9:05 AM - 9:20 AM

    MIT Innovation Ecosystem
    Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Director, Alliance Management
    MIT Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer
    Karl Koster, Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Karl Koster
    Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Director, Alliance Management
    MIT Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer

    Karl Koster is the Executive Director of MIT Corporate Relations. MIT Corporate Relations includes the MIT Industrial Liaison Program and MIT Startup Exchange.

    In that capacity, Koster and his staff work with the leadership of MIT and senior corporate executives to design and implement strategies for fostering corporate partnerships with the Institute. Koster and his team have also worked to identify and design a number of major international programs for MIT, which have been characterized by the establishment of strong, programmatic linkages among universities, industry, and governments. Most recently these efforts have been extended to engage the surrounding innovation ecosystem, including its vibrant startup and small company community, into MIT's global corporate and university networks.

    Koster is also the Director of Alliance Management in the Office of Strategic Alliances and Technology Transfer (OSATT). OSATT was launched in Fall 2019 as part of a plan to reinvent MIT’s research administration infrastructure. OSATT develops agreements that facilitate MIT projects, programs and consortia with industrial, nonprofit, and international sponsors, partners and collaborators.

    He is past chairman of the University-Industry Demonstration Partnership (UIDP), an organization that seeks to enhance the value of collaborative partnerships between universities and corporations.

    He graduated from Brown University with a BA in geology and economics, and received an MS from MIT Sloan School of Management. Prior to returning to MIT, Koster worked as a management consultant in Europe, Latin America, and the United States on projects for private and public sector organizations.

    9:20 AM - 10:00 AM

    Dean, MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

    Huttenlocher
    Daniel Huttenlocher

    Dean, MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing

    Daniel Huttenlocher is the inaugural dean of the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing. He began his academic career at Cornell University in 1988, where he was a member of the computer science faculty. In 1998, he chaired the task force that led to the creation of Cornell’s interdisciplinary Faculty of Computing and Information Science, later serving as its dean starting in 2009. In 2012, he became the founding dean of the new Cornell Tech campus in New York City.

    Huttenlocher has extensive industry experience, having served as a scientist and lab director at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center for 12 years before leaving to help establish a financial technology startup, Intelligent Markets, in 2000.

    Huttenlocher’s research and scholarship in computer science is broad and interdisciplinary, spanning algorithms, social media, and computer vision. He has earned the Longuet-Higgins Award for Fundamental Advances in Computer Vision (2010), and various fellowships and awards from the National Science Foundation, the Association for Computing Machinery, IEEE, and Phi Beta Kappa.

    He is a member of the boards of directors of Amazon and Corning, and of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, where he has served as chair since 2018.

    Huttenlocher earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan in 1980, double-majoring in computer and communication sciences and experimental psychology. An MIT alumnus, he earned an SM in electrical engineering and computer science in 1984 and a PhD in computer science in 1988.

    This talk presents the vision and current status for the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing, covering the academic and research programs and the new cross cutting activities that span across the schools at MIT.

    10:00 AM - 10:40 AM

    Assistant Professor of Architecture
    MIT Department of Architecture

    Miho Mazereeuw

    Assistant Professor of Architecture
    MIT Department of Architecture

    Miho Mazereeuw is a landscape architect and architect, who has taught at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University and the University of Toronto prior to joining the faculty at MIT. As an Arthur W. Wheelwright Fellow, she is completing her forthcoming book entitled Preemptive Design: Disaster and Urban Development along the Pacific Ring of Fire featuring case studies on infrastructure design, multifunctional public space and innovative planning strategies in earthquake prone regions. Her design work on disaster prevention has been exhibited at the Architect's Museum in Tokyo Japan, University of Texas at Austin and de Ark Architecture Center in Leewarden Netherlands.

    As a co-director of OPSYS, Mazereeuw is collaborating on a number of projects with international non-profit organizations in the field of disaster reconstruction/prevention and is currently working in Haiti, Japan and Chile. She was formerly an Associate at the Office for Metropolitan Architecture in Rotterdam where she worked on projects in the Latvia, China, Belgium, Russia, Saudi Arabia and Dubai. She has also worked in the offices of Shigeru Ban and Dan Kiley. Mazereeuw completed a Bachelor of Arts with High Honors in Sculpture and Environmental Science at Wesleyan University and her Master in Architecture and in Landscape Architecture with Distinction at the Harvard Graduate School of Design where she was awarded the Janet Darling Webel Prize and the Charles Eliot Traveling Fellowship.

  • DAY 2: Jan. 14 (Fri) Nano and Sustainable Materials
    9:00 AM - 9:05 AM

    Welcome and Introduction
    Program Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Steve Palmer
    Steven Palmer
    Program Director, MIT Corporate Relations

    Steve Palmer is a Program Director within MIT’s Office of Corporate Relations. Steven comes to OCR with many years of experience building relationships, advancing diplomacy, and seeking new business initiatives in both the public and private sectors. He has spent his career highlighting and translating technological issues for policy makers, engineers, analysts, and business leaders. Steven has worked in government, industry, and academia in the U.S. and abroad. He is also an Executive Coach at MIT Sloan and Harvard Business School. Steven earned his Bachelor of Science at Northeastern University, and his M.B.A. at MIT Sloan where he was in the Fellows Program for Innovation and Global Leadership.

    9:05 AM - 9:50 AM
    Paul M. Cook Associate Professor in Materials Science and Engineering
    Robert J. Macfarlane
    Paul M. Cook Associate Professor in Materials Science and Engineering

    Both inorganic nanoparticles and organic polymers offer unique advantages in the synthesis of materials with controllable properties (optical, magnetic, electrical) and chemical reactivities: polymers are highly modular structures that can incorporate many different chemical functional groups, and inorganic nanoparticles have size, shape, and material composition dependent properties such as surface plasmon resonances. Composites of these materials could result in powerful synthesis schemes for fabricating materials with controllable emergent properties, but a fundamental challenge in this area of research is developing self-assembly approaches to create polymer and nanoparticle composite materials where nanoscale order can be generated in a predictable and controllable manner. Research in the Macfarlane lab is focused on developing a set of design principles for synthesizing new inorganic/organic composite materials, where nanoscale structure can be manipulated to tune the emergent physical properties of a bulk material. These structures have the potential to significantly impact energy-related research via light manipulation (e.g. photonic band gaps or plasmonic metamaterials), electronic device fabrication (e.g. semiconducting substrates or data storage devices), and environmental and medical research (e.g. hydrogels for sustained drug delivery).

    9:50 AM - 10:35 AM
    Winslow Career Development Professor, Civil Engineering
    Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Plata
    Desirée Plata
    Winslow Career Development Professor, Civil Engineering
    Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Desirée holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Oceanography from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. She has a B.S. in Chemistry from Union College and proudly attended Gould Academy for high school.

  • DAY 3: Jan. 20 (Thu) MIT Startup Presentations
    9:00 AM - 9:05 AM

    Welcome and Introduction

    Program Director, MIT Startup Exchange

    Dahllof
    Marcus Dahllöf

    Program Director, MIT Startup Exchange

    Marcus Dahllöf leads MIT Startup Exchange, which facilitates connections between MIT-connected startups and corporate members of the MIT Industrial Liaison Program (ILP). Dahllöf manages networking events, workshops, the STEX25 accelerator, opportunity postings, and helps define the strategic direction of MIT Startup Exchange. He is a two-time tech entrepreneur (one exit in cybersecurity), and has previously held roles in finance, software engineering, corporate strategy, and business development at emerging tech companies and Fortune 100 corporations in the U.S., Latin America, and Europe. Marcus was a member of the Swedish national rowing team and he is a mentor at the MIT Venture Mentoring Service.

    9:05 AM - 10:25 AM

    PathrReal time insights and advanced spatial intelligence delivered across an organization’s ecosystem to positively impact business outcomes | 組織内のビジネスの成果につながるリアルタイムの洞察と空間的インテリジェンス

    Meter: Reimagining and democratizing access to industrial inspection | インスペクションのあり方を考え直して、普及させる技術

    Eureka Robotics: Democratizing High Accuracy – High Agility (HAHA) automation | 高精度・高敏捷なオートメーションの民主化

    Skylla Technologies: Precision mobility for smart automation | スマートオートメーションを実現する高精度なモビリティ

    Everactive: The self-powered IoT | 自己発電型IoTプラットフォーム

    mui Lab: IoT interfaces that enable a “calm” digital living | 穏やかな生活を可能にするIoT インターフェイス (only participating on Day 3 Lightning Talks session) 

    Eion TechnologiesCost and emission efficient battery recycling technology | コストとエミッション効率の良いバッテリーリサイクル技術

    OPT Industries: Digital manufacturing of materials at scale | 量産材料のデジタル製造

    E25Bio: Democratizing diagnostics | 診断技術の民主化 (診断を身近にする技術)

    Modulus Discovery: Cutting-edge simulation driven small molecule drug discovery | 最先端のシミュレーションを駆使した低分子化合物の創薬 

    4M Therapeutics: Developing small molecules for neuropsychiatric disorders | 精神神経疾患を対象とした低分子化合物の開発 

    Chief Revenue Officer, Pathr
    Alan Flohr
    Chief Revenue Officer

    Alan Flohr is the Chief Revenue Officer at Pathr.ai™. Flohr leads the global sales, business development, marketing and customer success teams. He brings over 20 years of experience leading sales and marketing for SaaS companies, demonstrating leadership in driving rapid growth for early-stage companies and consistently delivering winning go-to-market strategies. Recent roles include Vice President of Sales for Direct Commerce (Source to Pay software) and Chief Customer Officer at r4 Technologies (AI driven yield optimization).  Flohr graduated from the University at Buffalo and earned his MBA at The Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth.

    R&D Engineer, Meter
    Keith Pasko
    R&D Engineer

    Keith Pasko is R&D Engineer at Meter. He has led a career ranging from architecture to zero-emission vehicles. After receiving a degree in Design and Media Art at UCLA, his work has included award-winning music videos, software tools acquired by a tier-1 CAD company, Department of Energy research, as well as the launch and sale of several startups. He now works at Meter researching distributed algorithms, computational geometry, and machine learning. He has been an invited speaker, lecturer, and critic at Carnegie Mellon University, OTIS College of Art and Design, California College of the Arts, and Tokyo Polytechnic University. In his personal life, Keith has a strong love for Japanese food, craftsmanship, and culture, and is currently studying for the N3 language test. He also enjoys surfing, audio electronics, woodworking, and gardening. Keith lives in San Francisco with his cat Oslo.

    Co-founder & CEO, Eureka Robotics
    Phạm Quang Cường
    Co-founder & CEO

    Cường is a Co-founder and CEO of Eureka Robotics, a deep-tech startup devoted to solving the toughest automation challenges in manufacturing, and the recipient of the 2019 IEEE N3XT Star award. He was born in Hanoi, Vietnam. He is an alumnus of École Normale Supérieure, rue d’Ulm (France) and holds a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Université Pierre et Marie Curie (France). He was a visiting research student at MIT (USA) in 2005, a visiting researcher at the University of São Paulo (Brazil) in 2010, and a JSPS Fellow at the University of Tokyo (Japan) in 2011-2013. He joined NTU (Singapore) in 2013 and is currently an Associate Professor (on leave) in the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. He was a recipient of the Best Paper Award at the conference Robotics: Science and Systems, 2012. His research has been featured in major international media, including The New York Times, The Guardian, The Economist, CNN, Science, Nature, etc.

    Co-founder & CTO, Skylla Technologies
    Kota Weaver
    Co-founder & CTO

    Kota Weaver is a co-founder and CTO of Skylla Technologies, located in Lexington, Massachusetts, and a spin-off from Prof. Harry Asada’s lab at MIT. Skylla is transforming the manufacturing industry with its Jetstream Controller, a robot intelligence platform that features human-aware navigation and exceptional endpoint positioning accuracy. Skylla can help customers quickly and cost effectively deploy mobile manipulators and other vehicular robots for a wide range of applications in manufacturing, construction, and public service. Kota has prior experience at Neurala and Boston Incubation Center, working on various AI/ML, computer vision and robotics projects. He has a BS degree in Computer Science from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

    Brian Alessi
    VP of Marketing, Everactive
    Co-founder & CTO, mui Lab
    Munehiko Sato
    Co-founder & CTO

    Munehiko Sato is Co-founder and CTO of mui Lab, an IoT design startup based in Kyoto. Munehiko leads product development of mui IoT software and hardware platform. Mui Lab builds Mui IoT platform that provides Calm User Interface and User Experience for Smart Home products for customers worldwide. Prior to mui Lab, Munehiko worked on Human Computer Interaction research and product development from architecture size displays to on-body/on-garment interactions, at MIT Media Lab, Google, Disney Research, and Univ. of Tokyo.

    Co-founder & CEO, Eion Technologies
    Lifeng Wang
    Co-founder & CEO

    Lifeng Wang is the co-founder and CEO of Eion Inc., a MIT spin off technology company in battery material recycling. Before this, Mr. Wang served as COO of Yintai Investment, a family office in Los Angeles, that invests in high tech, media and real estate. Mr. Wang was also the founder and CEO of Xing Xing, a computer animation studio based in China ranked top 25 animation studios in Asia by Animation Magazine. He also served as executive director of Wuxi Film Studio and managed its film investment fund.

    Mr. Wang was admitted to the Special Class for Gifted and Talented Youth at the University of Science and Technology of China when he was 14, and received his M.Sc. in Computer Graphics from The University of British Columbia when he was 20.

    Founder & CEO, OPT Industries
    Jifei Ou
    Founder & CEO

    Jifei Ou is an inventor, entrepreneur, and researcher. He is the founder and CEO of OPT Industries. OPT Industries builds a digital manufacturing platform that accelerates material development, production, and uncovers new materials. Prior to OPT Industries, Jifei worked at the MIT Media lab as a researcher. His research work focuses on developing mechanical metamaterials through additive manufacturing. He has been leading projects that study biomimicry and bio-derived materials to design shape-changing packaging, garments and furniture.

    Bobby Brooke Herrera
    Co-founder & Chief Science Officer, E25Bio
    Founder & CEO, Modulus Discovery
    S. Roy Kimura
    Founder & CEO

    Roy is Founder & CEO of Modulus Discovery. He has over 20 years of computational drug discovery experience, including 10 years at Bristol-Myers Squibb in Connecticut, two years at Variagenics, a personalized medicine company formerly in Cambridge, MA, and three and a half years at Schrodinger, Inc., where he was responsible for launching collaborative research projects with global pharmaceutical firms and top academic laboratories. Roy also previously served as Visiting Associate Professor at Tokyo Institute of Technology, where he lectured in drug discovery and biotechnology entrepreneurship. Roy received his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Boston University, and completed his post-doctoral studies at MIT.

    Founder & CEO , 4M Therapeutics
    Pablo Lapuerta
    Founder & CEO

    Dr. Lapuerta has 25 years of experience in the biotech industry, leading teams and building capabilities to develop and market new medicines. He is currently Chief Executive Officer of the biotech startup 4M Therapeutics Inc., and President of Lapuerta Consulting, LLC.

    Previously, he spent almost 10 years as Chief Medical Officer at Lexicon Pharmaceuticals enhancing its capabilities in drug development, medical affairs, and safety. He obtained approval of two new medications, one in oncology and another in diabetes. He also worked with sales and marketing teams and the investor community. Lexicon raised 1 billion dollars based on pipeline progress.

    Prior to Lexicon, he was a vice president at Bristol‐Myers Squibb and was Chief Medical Officer at Cogentus Pharmaceuticals. Dr. Lapuerta has over 100 publications on a wide range of topics in healthcare, including contributions to both the New England Journal of Medicine and the Wall Street Journal. He is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Medical School.

    Dr. Lapuerta lives with his wife near Princeton, New Jersey and is active as a volunteer faculty member at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, where he recently received an award for teaching patient‐centered medicine.

    10:25 AM - 10:45 AM

    Breakout Rooms
  • Day 4: Jan. 21 (Fri) Bio-Electronics and Sensing
    9:00 AM - 9:05 AM

    Welcome and Introduction
    Program Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Industrial Liaison Program
    Miki Kato
    Miki Kato
    Program Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Industrial Liaison Program

    Miki Kato joined the MIT Industrial Liaison Program as a Program Director in October 2021. Mr. Kato has over 20 years of experience in new business development, including a variety of activities with MIT.

    Prior to joining the ILP, Kato worked at FUJIFILM Corporation for 40 years in various new business development sectors. He was President of FUJIFILM Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc., conducting the clinical trials of FUJIFILM pipeline drugs and leading the joint research project in drug delivery with MIT’s Koch Institute. In his tenure, he also collaborated with the Department of Electrical Engineering at MIT for digital camera’s CMOS image sensors and the Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering for high-speed photo detectors.

    Kato has presented at several conferences at the Cambridge Innovation Center, including the 2018 Japan Innovation Forum with the Consulate General of Japan and the 60th anniversary Kyoto-Boston sister city celebration Life Science Forum (2019) with the City of Boston, the Japan Society of Boston, and the Consulate General of Japan.

    He holds an M.E. in Polymer Chemistry from Kyoto University and an M.S. in Management of Technology from MIT.

    9:05 AM - 9:50 AM
    Associate Professor, MIT Mechanical Engineering
    Jeehwan Kim
    Associate Professor, MIT Mechanical Engineering

    Prof. Jeehwan Kim's group at MIT focuses on innovations in nanotechnology for next generation computing and electronics. Prof. Kim joined MIT in September 2015. Before joining MIT, he was a Research Staff Member at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY since 2008 right after his Ph.D. He worked on next generation CMOS and energy materials/devices at IBM. Prof. Kim is a recipient of 20 IBM high value invention achievement awards. In 2012, he was appointed a “Master Inventor” of IBM in recognition of his active intellectual property generation and commercialization of his research. After joining MIT, he continuously worked nanotechnology for advanced electronics/photonics. As its recognition, he received LAM Research foundation Award, IBM Faculty Award, DARPA Young Faculty Award, and DARPA Director’s Fellowship. He is an inventor of > 200 issued/pending US patents and an author of > 50 articles in peer-reviewed journals. He currently serves as Associate Editor of Science Advances, AAAS. He received his B.S. from Hongik University, his M.S. from Seoul National University, and his Ph.D. from UCLA, all of them in Materials Science.

    For future of electronics such as bioelectronics, 3D integrated electronics, and bendable electronics, needs for flexibility and stackability of electronic products have substantially grown up. However, conventional wafer-based single-crystalline semiconductors cannot catch up with such trends because they are bound to the thick rigid wafers such that they are neither flexible nor stackable. Although polymer-based organic electronic materials are more compatible as they are mechanically complaint and less costly than inorganic counterparts, their electronic/photonic performance is substantially inferior to that of single-crystalline inorganic materials. For the past half a decade, my research group at MIT has focused on mitigating such performance-mechanical compliance dilemma by developing methods to obtain cheap, flexible, stackable, single-crystalline inorganic systems. In today’s talk, I will discuss about our strategies to realize such a dream electronic system and how these strategies unlock new ways of manufacturing advanced electronic systems. I will highlight our 2D materials-based layer transfer (2DLT) technique that can produce single-crystalline freestanding membranes from any compound materials with their excellent semiconducting performance. In addition, I will present unprecedented artificial heterostructures enabled by stacking of those freestanding 3D material membranes, e.g., world’s smallest vertically-stacked full color micro-LEDs, world’s best multiferroic devices, battery-less wireless e-skin, and reconfigurable hetero-integrated chips with AI accelerators.

    9:50 AM - 10:35 AM
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering
    Brian Anthony
    Associate Director, MIT.nano
    Faculty Lead, Industry Immersion Program in Mechanical Engineering

    Dr. Anthony has over 25 years of commercial, research, and teaching experience in product realization and information enabled manufacturing. He has extensive experience in market driven technology innovation, product realization, and business entrepreneurship and commercialization at the intersection between information technology and advanced manufacturing. His research and product development interests cross the boundaries of manufacturing and design, medical imaging, computer vision, acoustic and ultrasonic imaging, large‐scale computation and simulation, optimization, metrology, autonomous systems, sensors, and robotics. His teaching interests include the modeling of large-scale systems in a wide variety of decision-making domains and the development of optimization algorithms and software for analyzing and designing such systems.  He teaches on-line and on-campus professional programs in Smart Manufacturing and Sensory Systems Beyond IoT.

    Dr. Anthony spent the first part of his career as an entrepreneur. He developed and directed the development of products and solutions for the industrial and scientific video markets. His products fueled corporate growth from startup to dominant market leader. He has been awarded 20 patents, published over 100 peer reviewed articles, and won an Emmy from the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for innovations in sports broadcast technical innovation.

  • DAY 5: Jan. 27 (Thu) One on one meetings between ILP members and MIT connected startups (prior sign-up required)
    9:00 AM - 9:05 AM

    Welcome and Introduction

    Program Director, MIT Startup Exchange

    Dahllof
    Marcus Dahllöf

    Program Director, MIT Startup Exchange

    Marcus Dahllöf leads MIT Startup Exchange, which facilitates connections between MIT-connected startups and corporate members of the MIT Industrial Liaison Program (ILP). Dahllöf manages networking events, workshops, the STEX25 accelerator, opportunity postings, and helps define the strategic direction of MIT Startup Exchange. He is a two-time tech entrepreneur (one exit in cybersecurity), and has previously held roles in finance, software engineering, corporate strategy, and business development at emerging tech companies and Fortune 100 corporations in the U.S., Latin America, and Europe. Marcus was a member of the Swedish national rowing team and he is a mentor at the MIT Venture Mentoring Service.

    Invitation Only -- To schedule a one-on-one meeting with a startup, ILP members should contact their Program Director.

    9:05 AM - 11:00 AM

    One-on-one Meetings

    Startups from Day 3 Lightning Talks:

    PathrReal time insights and advanced spatial intelligence delivered across an organization’s ecosystem to positively impact business outcomes | 組織内のビジネスの成果につながるリアルタイムの洞察と空間的インテリジェンス

    Meter: Reimagining and democratizing access to industrial inspection | インスペクションのあり方を考え直して、普及させる技術

    Eureka Robotics: Democratizing High Accuracy – High Agility (HAHA) automation | 高精度・高敏捷なオートメーションの民主化

    Skylla Technologies: Precision mobility for smart automation | スマートオートメーションを実現する高精度なモビリティ

    Everactive: The self-powered IoT | 自己発電型IoTプラットフォーム

    Eion TechnologiesCost and emission efficient battery recycling technology | コストとエミッション効率の良いバッテリーリサイクル技術

    OPT Industries: Digital manufacturing of materials at scale | 量産材料のデジタル製造

    E25Bio: Democratizing diagnostics | 診断技術の民主化 (診断を身近にする技術)

    Modulus Discovery: Cutting-edge simulation driven small molecule drug discovery | 最先端のシミュレーションを駆使した低分子化合物の創薬 

    4M Therapeutics: Developing small molecules for neuropsychiatric disorders | 精神神経疾患を対象とした低分子化合物の開発 

    Additional startups for one-on-one meetings:

    Realtime RoboticsSmart automation to reduce cost and increase productivity | コスト削減と生産性向上を実現するスマートオートメーション

    WiTricityEV wireless charging that is electric, shared and autonomous | 電気を共有し、自律して行う電気自動車用ワイヤレス充電

    KebotixMaterials for tomorrow, today | 材料のこれからと今

    TagupIndustrial AI software that improves equipment reliability, efficiency and safety | 機器の持つ、機能の信頼、効率、安全性を高める産業用AIソフトウェア

  • DAY 6: Jan. 28 (Fri) Quantum Systems and Smart Homes
    9:00 AM - 9:05 AM

    Welcome and Introduction
    Program Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Associate Director, MIT-ILP, Japan
    Keiji Yano
    Program Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Associate Director, MIT-ILP, Japan

    Keiji Yano is a program director at MIT Corporate Relations and associate director of MIT-ILP, Japan in Tokyo. He has been associated with the office since September 2008 and has been enjoying connecting Japanese ILP member companies with the MIT community since then. He has been always fascinated by the risks companies are willing to take to make an impact in society.

    Prior to joining the ILP, Yano managed his own consulting company while he was a visiting researcher at the MIT Whitehead Institute for three years. Prior to that, he was the technical area manager for the Asia/Pacific region at Coventor, an MIT-connected startup software company developing MEMS. While at Coventor he established many relationships with companies from all over the world. He provided services to help companies design and build prototypes for new devices or products. He started his career as a process engineer in the basic design group from concept design to preoperation test of the Nuclear Waste plant project for Tokai #2 Nuclear Power Plant in Japan.

    He holds a B.S. in science and technology from Nihon University and Ph.D. in Fluid Dynamics in Aerospace Engineering from the Ohio State University.

    9:05 AM - 9:50 AM
    Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
    Professor of Physics
    MIT Lincoln Laboratory Fellow
    Director, MIT Center for Quantum Engineering (CQE)
    Associate Director, MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE)
    William Oliver
    Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
    Professor of Physics
    MIT Lincoln Laboratory Fellow
    Director, MIT Center for Quantum Engineering (CQE)
    Associate Director, MIT Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE)

    William D. Oliver is a Principal Investigator in the Engineering Quantum Systems Group (MIT campus) and the Quantum Information and Integrated Nanosystems Group (MIT Lincoln Laboratory). He provides programmatic and technical leadership targeting the development of quantum and classical high-performance computing technologies. Will’s research interests include the materials growth, fabrication, design, and measurement of superconducting qubits, as well as the development of cryogenic packaging and control electronics involving cryogenic CMOS and single-flux quantum digital logic. Will is a Fellow of the American Physical Society; serves on the National Quantum Initiative Advisory Committee and the US Committee for Superconducting Electronics; is an IEEE Applied Superconductivity Conference (ASC) Board Member; and is a member of IEEE, APS, Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, and Tau Beta Pi.

    Will received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the Stanford University, the SM in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT, and a BS in Electrical Engineering and BA in Japanese from the University of Rochester (NY).

    Superconducting qubits are coherent artificial atoms assembled from electrical circuit elements and microwave optical components. Their lithographic scalability, compatibility with microwave control, and operability at nanosecond time scales all converge to make the superconducting qubit a highly attractive candidate for quantum computation. Over the past decade, spectacular improvements in the manufacturing and control of these devices have moved these devices from the realm of scientific curiosity to the threshold of technical reality. In this talk, we present the progress, challenges, and opportunities ahead in the engineering larger scale processors.

    9:50 AM - 10:35 AM
    Thuan and Nicole Pham Professor
    MacArthur Fellow
    Leader of NETMIT Research Group
    Director of the MIT Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing
    Dina
    Dina Katabi
    Thuan and Nicole Pham Professor
    MacArthur Fellow
    Leader of NETMIT Research Group
    Director of the MIT Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing

    Dina Katabi is the Thuan and Nicole Pham Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and the director of MIT’s Center for Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (Wireless@MIT). Katabi is also a MacArthur Fellow and a Member of the National Academy of Engineering. She received her PhD and MS from MIT and her BS from Damascus University. Katabi has received the ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award, the Faculty Research Innovation Fellowship, the Sloan Fellowship, the NBX Career Development chair, and the NSF CAREER award. Katabi's doctoral dissertation won an ACM Honorable Mention award and a Sprowls award for academic excellence. Further, her work was recognized by the IEEE William R. Bennett prize, three ACM SIGCOMM Best Paper awards, an NSDI Best Paper award, the SIGCOMM Test-of-Time award, and a TR10 award for her work on the sparse Fourier transform. Several start-ups have been spun out of Katabi's lab, such as PiCharging and Emerald.

    10:35 AM - 10:40 AM

    Closing Remarks
    Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Director, Alliance Management
    MIT Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer
    Karl Koster, Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Karl Koster
    Executive Director, MIT Corporate Relations
    Director, Alliance Management
    MIT Office of Strategic Alliances & Technology Transfer

    Karl Koster is the Executive Director of MIT Corporate Relations. MIT Corporate Relations includes the MIT Industrial Liaison Program and MIT Startup Exchange.

    In that capacity, Koster and his staff work with the leadership of MIT and senior corporate executives to design and implement strategies for fostering corporate partnerships with the Institute. Koster and his team have also worked to identify and design a number of major international programs for MIT, which have been characterized by the establishment of strong, programmatic linkages among universities, industry, and governments. Most recently these efforts have been extended to engage the surrounding innovation ecosystem, including its vibrant startup and small company community, into MIT's global corporate and university networks.

    Koster is also the Director of Alliance Management in the Office of Strategic Alliances and Technology Transfer (OSATT). OSATT was launched in Fall 2019 as part of a plan to reinvent MIT’s research administration infrastructure. OSATT develops agreements that facilitate MIT projects, programs and consortia with industrial, nonprofit, and international sponsors, partners and collaborators.

    He is past chairman of the University-Industry Demonstration Partnership (UIDP), an organization that seeks to enhance the value of collaborative partnerships between universities and corporations.

    He graduated from Brown University with a BA in geology and economics, and received an MS from MIT Sloan School of Management. Prior to returning to MIT, Koster worked as a management consultant in Europe, Latin America, and the United States on projects for private and public sector organizations.