Past Event

2020 MIT ILP Regional Webinar Series #3

July 2, 2020
2020 MIT ILP Regional Webinar Series #3
Webinar

Location

Zoom Webinar

Overview

The world is facing unprecedented challenges with the COVID-19 pandemic, further complicating complex global innovation trends and demanding unparalleled response from governments and organizations alike. As China and other affected Asian nations have been fighting the pandemic, forward-looking collaborations in technology development and innovation are more important than ever. This key element of collaboration in addressing global innovation is a hallmark of MIT’s problem-solving approach, especially amidst our current global challenges. 

In the coming months, the MIT Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) is pleased to present a special webinar series featuring leading researchers and field experts to share insights in energy, nanomaterials, novel photonics, robotics, city planning, healthcare, and more.

We invite you to join the 2020 MIT ILP Regional Webinar Series to engage and explore topics with our experts, including opportunities to interact with academics and global ILP member executives, to drive national and international economic growth through innovation and entrepreneurship in each covered field.

  • Overview

    The world is facing unprecedented challenges with the COVID-19 pandemic, further complicating complex global innovation trends and demanding unparalleled response from governments and organizations alike. As China and other affected Asian nations have been fighting the pandemic, forward-looking collaborations in technology development and innovation are more important than ever. This key element of collaboration in addressing global innovation is a hallmark of MIT’s problem-solving approach, especially amidst our current global challenges. 

    In the coming months, the MIT Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) is pleased to present a special webinar series featuring leading researchers and field experts to share insights in energy, nanomaterials, novel photonics, robotics, city planning, healthcare, and more.

    We invite you to join the 2020 MIT ILP Regional Webinar Series to engage and explore topics with our experts, including opportunities to interact with academics and global ILP member executives, to drive national and international economic growth through innovation and entrepreneurship in each covered field.


Agenda

11:00am - 12:00pm
Principal Research Scientist, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, MIT
Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School (Part Time)
Instructor, Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Staff Intensivist, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Leo Anthony Celi MD MS MPH
Principal Research Scientist, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, MIT
Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School (Part Time)
Instructor, Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Staff Intensivist, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Leo Anthony Celi has practiced medicine in three continents, giving him broad perspectives in healthcare delivery. As clinical research director and principal research scientist at MIT Laboratory of Computational Physiology (LCP), he brings together clinicians and data scientists to support research using data routinely collected in the intensive care unit (ICU). His group built and maintains the Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care (MIMIC) database. This public-access database has been meticulously de-identified and is freely shared online with the research community. It is an unparalleled research resource; over 2000 investigators from more than 30 countries have free access to the clinical data under a data use agreement. In 2016, LCP partnered with Philips eICU Research Institute to host the eICU database with more than 2 million ICU patients admitted across the United States. The goal is to scale the database globally and build an international collaborative research community around health data analytics.

Leo founded and co-directs Sana, a cross-disciplinary organization based at the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, whose objective is to leverage information technology to improve health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. At its core is an open-source mobile tele-health platform that allows for capture, transmission, and archiving of complex medical data (e.g. images, videos, physiologic signals such as ECG, EEG and oto-acoustic emission responses), in addition to patient demographic and clinical information. Sana is the inaugural recipient of both the mHealth (Mobile Health) Alliance Award from the United Nations Foundation and the Wireless Innovation Award from the Vodafone Foundation in 2010. The software has since been implemented around the globe including India, Kenya, Lebanon, Haiti, Mongolia, Uganda, Brazil, Ethiopia, Argentina, and South Africa.

He is one of the course directors for HST.936—global health informatics to improve quality of care, and HST.953—secondary analysis of electronic health records, both at MIT. He is an editor of the textbook for each course, both released under an open access license. The textbook Secondary Analysis of Electronic Health Records came out in October 2016 and was downloaded over 48,000 times in the first two months of publication. The course “Global Health Informatics to Improve Quality of Care” was launched under MITx in February 2017.

Leo was featured as a designer in the Smithsonian Museum National Design Triennial “Why Design Now?” held at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum in New York City in 2010 for his work in global health informatics. He was also selected as one of 12 external reviewers for the National Academy of Medicine 2014 report “Investing in Global Health Systems: Sustaining gains, transforming lives.”

COVID-19 is a formidable global threat, impacting all aspects of society and exacerbating the existing inequities of our current social systems. As we battle the virus across multiple fronts, data are critical for understanding this disease and for coordinating an effective global response. Given the current digitization of so many aspects of life, we are amassing data that can be extrapolated and analyzed for the effective forecasting, prevention, and treatment of COVID-19. Learning from the data, responsibly and across disciplines, in combination with communication, education, treatment, and policy decisions, are our best ways forward to defeat this virus while laying the groundwork for collaborative data science in the face of future calamity.

  • Agenda
    11:00am - 12:00pm
    Principal Research Scientist, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, MIT
    Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School (Part Time)
    Instructor, Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
    Staff Intensivist, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
    Leo Anthony Celi MD MS MPH
    Principal Research Scientist, Institute for Medical Engineering and Science, MIT
    Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School (Part Time)
    Instructor, Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
    Staff Intensivist, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

    Leo Anthony Celi has practiced medicine in three continents, giving him broad perspectives in healthcare delivery. As clinical research director and principal research scientist at MIT Laboratory of Computational Physiology (LCP), he brings together clinicians and data scientists to support research using data routinely collected in the intensive care unit (ICU). His group built and maintains the Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care (MIMIC) database. This public-access database has been meticulously de-identified and is freely shared online with the research community. It is an unparalleled research resource; over 2000 investigators from more than 30 countries have free access to the clinical data under a data use agreement. In 2016, LCP partnered with Philips eICU Research Institute to host the eICU database with more than 2 million ICU patients admitted across the United States. The goal is to scale the database globally and build an international collaborative research community around health data analytics.

    Leo founded and co-directs Sana, a cross-disciplinary organization based at the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, whose objective is to leverage information technology to improve health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries. At its core is an open-source mobile tele-health platform that allows for capture, transmission, and archiving of complex medical data (e.g. images, videos, physiologic signals such as ECG, EEG and oto-acoustic emission responses), in addition to patient demographic and clinical information. Sana is the inaugural recipient of both the mHealth (Mobile Health) Alliance Award from the United Nations Foundation and the Wireless Innovation Award from the Vodafone Foundation in 2010. The software has since been implemented around the globe including India, Kenya, Lebanon, Haiti, Mongolia, Uganda, Brazil, Ethiopia, Argentina, and South Africa.

    He is one of the course directors for HST.936—global health informatics to improve quality of care, and HST.953—secondary analysis of electronic health records, both at MIT. He is an editor of the textbook for each course, both released under an open access license. The textbook Secondary Analysis of Electronic Health Records came out in October 2016 and was downloaded over 48,000 times in the first two months of publication. The course “Global Health Informatics to Improve Quality of Care” was launched under MITx in February 2017.

    Leo was featured as a designer in the Smithsonian Museum National Design Triennial “Why Design Now?” held at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum in New York City in 2010 for his work in global health informatics. He was also selected as one of 12 external reviewers for the National Academy of Medicine 2014 report “Investing in Global Health Systems: Sustaining gains, transforming lives.”

    COVID-19 is a formidable global threat, impacting all aspects of society and exacerbating the existing inequities of our current social systems. As we battle the virus across multiple fronts, data are critical for understanding this disease and for coordinating an effective global response. Given the current digitization of so many aspects of life, we are amassing data that can be extrapolated and analyzed for the effective forecasting, prevention, and treatment of COVID-19. Learning from the data, responsibly and across disciplines, in combination with communication, education, treatment, and policy decisions, are our best ways forward to defeat this virus while laying the groundwork for collaborative data science in the face of future calamity.