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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

346 Results | Page 1 | 2 | 3 | .. | 68 | 69 | Last | Next
 

June 2018
ILP Research Group
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RESEARCH SURVEYS - TOPICS LIST

ILP Research Group
This list is a guide to MIT ILP research surveys on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies. The list includes research surveys from 2016 to present and is updated regularly.

September 2018
MIT Press
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Carbon Capture

Howard J. Herzog
The MIT Press Essential Knowledge series
A concise overview of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), a promising but overlooked climate change mitigation pathway.

The burning of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide (CO2), and these CO2 emissions are a major driver of climate change. Carbon capture offers a path to climate change mitigation that has received relatively little attention. In this volume in the MIT Press Essential Knowledge series, Howard Herzog offers a concise guide to carbon capture, covering basic information as well as the larger context of climate technology and policy. Carbon capture, or carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), refers to a suite of technologies that reduce CO2 emissions by “capturing” CO2 before it is released into the atmosphere and then transporting it to where it will be stored or used. It is the only climate change mitigation technique that deals directly with fossil fuels rather than providing alternatives to them.

Herzog, a pioneer in carbon capture research, begins by discussing the fundamentals of climate change and how carbon capture can be one of the solutions. He explains capture and storage technologies, including chemical scrubbing and the injection of CO2 deep underground. He reports on current efforts to deploy CCS at factories and power plants and attempts to capture CO2 from the air itself. Finally, he explores the policies and politics in play around CCS and argues for elevating carbon capture in the policy agenda.



About the Author:
Howard J. Herzog is Senior Research Engineer in the MIT Energy Initiative. He ran an industrial consortium on CCS from 2000 to 2016, served as a US delegate to the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum's Technical Group from 2003 to 2007, and was a Coordinating Lead Author for the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (2005).

September 2018
MIT Press
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Haptics

Lynette Jones
The MIT Press Essential Knowledge series


An accessible, nontechnical overview of active touch sensing, from sensory receptors in the skin to tactile surfaces on flat screen displays.

Haptics, or haptic sensing, refers to the ability to identify and perceive objects through touch. This is active touch, involving exploration of an object with the hand rather than the passive sensing of a vibration or force on the skin. The development of new technologies, including prosthetic hands and tactile surfaces for flat screen displays, depends on our knowledge of haptics. In this volume in the MIT Press Essential Knowledge series, Lynette Jones offers an accessible overview of haptics, or active touch sensing, and its applications.

Jones explains that haptics involves integrating information from touch and kinesthesia—that is, information both from sensors in the skin and from sensors in muscles, tendons, and joints. The challenge for technology is to reproduce in a virtual world some of the sensations associated with physical interactions with the environment.

Jones maps the building blocks of the tactile system, the receptors in the skin and the skin itself, and how information is processed at this interface with the external world. She describes haptic perception, the processing of haptic information in the brain; haptic illusions, or distorted perceptions of objects and the body itself; tactile and haptic displays, from braille to robotic systems; tactile compensation for other sensory impairments; surface haptics, which creates virtual haptic effects on physical surfaces such as touch screens; and the development of robotic and prosthetic hands that mimic the properties of human hands.


About the Author:
Lynette Jones is Senior Research Scientist in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT and is Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Haptics.

July 2018
The MIT Press
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When Innovation Moves at Digital Speed

MIT Sloan Management Review
Strategies and Tactics to Provoke, Sustain, and Defend Innovation in Today's Unsettled Markets


Practical advice from experts on how to create, manage, measure, and improve innovation in and for today's digital markets

All organizations grapple with what digitalization means for their business and, in particular, how digital forces will drive their approaches to innovation. But very few organizations have clearly defined the scale, speed, and scope of their engagement with the digital world. These essays, from the pages of the preeminent journal MIT Sloan Management Review, offer practical advice from experts on how to create, facilitate, and manage innovation in and for today's digital markets.

The essays emphasize the power of intersections, where different mindsets and skills collide. These connections can be external—LEGO, for example, has engaged more than 100,000 adult fans in user communities—or internal, as when “brokers,” “connectors,” and “energizers” act within organizations. Contributors stress the value of action over analysis, citing examples that affirm the power of trial-and-error experimentation. They demonstrate that innovation success requires thinking beyond technology. Innovation is not created by white-coated scientists in a lab; it is not the job of the few but of the many. And finally, the contributors warn that the greatest enemy lies within; innovators often encounter fierce internal resistance. They consider innovations in the innovation process itself, describing the promise and pitfalls of “design thinking” and offering advice on how to manage the tension between new and existing business models.

Innovation is not a magical act practiced by a select few with rare gifts. Innovation is a discipline that can be measured, managed, and improved. When Innovation Moves at Digital Speed provides practical guidance for innovation success.

Contributors:
Daniel Amaral, Jamie Anderson, Scott D. Anthony, Yun Mi Antorini, Michael Arena, Tormod Askildsen, Michael Ballé, Thomas Bartman, Jennie Björk, Marcel Bogers, Anna Brattström, Clayton M. Christensen, Edivandro Carlos Conforto, Rob Cross, Charles Dhanaraj, Thomas Fink, Nicolai J. Foss, Johan Frishammar, Johann Harnoss, Srivardhini K. Jha, Lâle Kesebi, Rishikesha T. Krishnan, Martin Kupp, Sean Looram, Mats Magnusson, Ann Majchrzak, Arvind Malhotra, James Morgan, Albert M. Muñiz, Jr., Ramiro Palma, Ishwardutt Parulkar, Eric Rebentisch (MIT), Jörg Reckhenrich, Martin Reeves, Anders Richtnér, Dave Rochlin, Duncan Simester (MIT), Jonathan Sims, Joseph V. Sinfield, Durward K. Sobek II, Freddy Solis, Kristian J. Sund, Mary Uhl-Bien, Derek van Bever, J. Andrei Villarroel, Amy Webb

May 2018
ILP Research Group
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Sensors

ILP Research Survey
Survey of MIT research:

Environmental sensing * infrastructure monitoring * medicine * mobile / smartphone sensors * nanosensors & quantum sensing * sensor networks & data * touch / haptics * transportation & city science



Please note that the ILP RESEARCH SURVEY LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies and that the older the survey is, the more likely that it will contain some inactive projects.