Where Industry Meets Innovation

  • Contact Us
  • sign in Sign In
  • Sign in with certificate
mit campus

Past Conferences

Conference Details - Agenda

ILP Conference overview header image

2018 MIT Research and Development Conference

Accelerating Big Impact Innovations
November 14-15, 2018
 

Day 1: Wednesday, November 14, 2018

7:30 - 8:30

Kresge Auditorium, W16

Registration with Light Breakfast

8:30 - 8:45

Welcome Remarks & MIT Innovation Ecosystem

8:45 - 9:15

5G and Artificial Intelligence to Enable a Richer User Experience
Two current technology domains rendering intense focus and attention are 5G and Artificial Intelligence. These technologies will be the foundation for a new wave of innovation that will transform industries around the world and ultimately enrich our lives. We will explore how 5G is relevant to much more than peak data rates, including how its ultra-low latency and high reliability in combination with on-device AI will enable powerful new use cases. We will also discuss the important practical challenges that technology leaders must face to achieve this vision. You will learn from a leader of a company that is inventing breakthrough technologies which transform how the world connects, computes, and communicates how 5G and on-device intelligence will transform the wireless edge.
Read More

9:15 - 9:45

Technology Innovation at MIT Lincoln Laboratory
MIT Lincoln Laboratory researches and develops a broad array of advanced technologies to meet critical national security needs. Lincoln Laboratory has a strong focus on designing and building full-scale advanced technology and operational prototypes for US government sponsors. Recent examples of full-scale prototypes include the ground and space laser communications terminals that enabled the world’s fastest data download from the moon to the earth; the highest-resolution long-range microwave radar for imaging satellites in orbit; and a beam-combined, all-electric fiber laser that achieved the highest brightness ever recorded. Dr. Evans will discuss recent innovations at Lincoln Laboratory and the processes and conditions for sustaining such an innovation environment.
Read More

9:45 - 9:55

The Engine
Founded by MIT, The Engine bridge the gap between discovery and commercialization by empowering disruptive technologies with the longterm capital, knowledge, and specialized equipment and labs they need to thrive. We help founders build the next generation of world-changing companies.

9:55 - 10:00

MIT Professional Education

10:00 - 10:25

Networking Break

10:25 - 10:30

MIT Sloan Executive Education

10:30 - 11:00

The New Frontiers of Design

11:00 - 11:30

Panel Discussion: Reimagining Your Company in a Changing Environment
Moderator: Scott Kirsner
Panelists: Lane Ballard (VP, Boeing), Jerry Gupta (SVP, Swiss Re), Jay Iyengar (SVP, Xylem), Steve Whittaker (Head of Research Partnership, BT)

11:30 - 12:00

MIT Startup Exchange: Introduction with Lightning Talks

MIT Startup Exchange actively promotes collaboration and partnerships between MIT-connected startups and industry. Qualified startups are those founded and/or led by MIT faculty, staff, or alumni, or are based on MIT-licensed technology. Industry participants are principally members of MIT’s Industrial Liaison Program (ILP).

MIT Startup Exchange maintains a propriety database of over 1,500 MIT-connected startups with roots across MIT departments, labs and centers; it hosts a robust schedule of startup workshops and showcases, and facilitates networking and introductions between startups and corporate executives.

STEX25 is a startup accelerator within MIT Startup Exchange, featuring 25 “industry ready” startups that have proven to be exceptional with early use cases, clients, demos, or partnerships, and are poised for significant growth. STEX25 startups receive promotion, travel, and advisory support, and are prioritized for meetings with ILP’s 230 member companies.

MIT Startup Exchange and ILP are integrated programs of MIT Corporate Relations.
Read More

Startup Lightning Talks Part I
- 3DEO, Dale Fried, Founder and CEO
- CATALOG, Hyunjun Park, Cofounder and CEO
- DUST Identity, Ophir Gaathon, Cofounder and CEO
- The Foam Printing Project, Matthew Pearlson, Founder
- Honeycomb, Christine Yen, Founder

Startup Lightning Talks Part II
- Interpretable AI, Daisy Zhuo, Cofounder
- Landsdowne Labs, Melissa Fensterstock, CEO
- Posh, Karan Kashyap, Cofounder and CTO
- Silverthread, Dan Sturtevant, Cofounder and CEO
- Xibus Systems, Chris Hartshorn, Cofounder and CEO

12:00 - 2:00

Media Lab, E14 6th floor

Lunch with Startup Exhibit

Samberg Conference Center, E52
Dining Room 5/6

Track 1: Technology from MIT Lincoln Lab

2:00 - 2:40

On-the-move Monitoring of Human Health and Performance
With the proliferation of commercial wearable devices, we are now able to obtain unprecedented insight into the ever-changing physical state of our bodies. These devices allow real-time monitoring of biosignals that can generate actionable information to enable optimized interventions to avoid injury and enhance performance. Combat and medical planners across all military services are keenly interested in harnessing wearable sensor advances to diagnose, predict, and improve warfighter health and performance. However, moving from civilian promise to military reality is complex, with unique requirements of hardware design, real-time networking, data management, cybersecurity, predictive model building, and decision science. Emerging technologies for military on-the-move monitoring will be highlighted, along with a discussion of an integrated open systems architecture approach for functional evolution.
Read More

2:40 - 3:20

Laser Communications to Enable Space Exploration and Commercialization
Traditionally, communications between the Earth and space have relied on radio frequency (rf) systems, which have been in use since the Apollo era when sensor technology was primitive and the Internet did not exist. Today, commercial companies have deployed satellites with sensors that generate many Terabytes of data each day, but only a fraction of this data is transmitted back to earth due to communications bandwidth constraints. Furthermore, as humans venture deeper into space, higher communications bandwidth will be required to support them. Free-space laser communications, or “lasercom,” offers a high bandwidth and low size, weight, and power solution to the space bandwidth bottleneck by using the same lasers and techniques which revolutionized fiber-optic communications in the 1990’s. This talk will detail the 15+ year collaboration between MIT Lincoln Lab and NASA in architecting and deploying lasercom systems, the current efforts to develop a strong industry base in lasercom, and upcoming lasercom missions.

This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Air Force Contract No. FA8702-15-D-0001. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration .
Read More

3:20 - 3:40

Networking Break

3:40 - 4:20

Superconducting Microelectronics for Next-generation Computing
Incredible progress in transistor-based integrated circuits has continued to drive advances in computing, despite the end of scaling for performance parameters, including clock speed and operating voltage. As the limited remaining options for improving CMOS-based circuits are pursued, superconductor-based integrated circuits offer a promising alternative with demonstrated clock speeds of hundreds of gigahertz and highly energy-efficient operation. Recent progress towards superconducting integrated circuits with a million Josephson junctions and complex, lossless interconnects will be described. Additionally, some of the challenges in developing systems with computing capabilities and cost that are competitive with CMOS-based systems will be discussed in the context of the most promising near-term applications. This work was supported in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via Air Force Contract FA872105C0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of the ODNI, IARPA, or the U.S. Government.
Read More

4:20 - 5:00

Faster, More Sensitive, and More Intelligent Imaging Systems
Over the past few decades, affordable high-resolution imagery has become ubiquitous and broadly applied for scientific discovery, defense, industry, and entertainment. This transformation was enabled by the transition of photography from analog film-based cameras to modern digital imagery, along with simultaneous improvement in compact optics, data processing, storage, and communication. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has been a key innovator helping to drive this transition with the prototyping of high-performance digital imaging systems. This talk will discuss recent improvements in imaging system speed, sensitivity, and resolution. The path to incorporate greater processing and intelligence into the imager itself will also be discussed.

This material is based upon work supported by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering under Air Force Contract No. FA8702-15-D-0001. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering.


Read More

Samberg Conference Center, E52
Dining Room 3

Track 2: Energy

2:00 - 2:40

Using Renewable Electricity to Valorize Carbon Dioxide
Society's impending transition to a low-carbon energy economy will require new technologies that utilize renewable electricity to drive the conversion of waste carbon dioxide into valuable fuels, chemicals, and materials. In principle, this conversion can be achieved using an electrochemical device consisting of two catalysts: one that promotes the conversion of water to oxygen and another that converts carbon dioxide into a desired product. Whereas established catalysts exist for oxygen evolution, high-efficiency catalysts for carbon dioxide conversion are virtually non-existent, due to a lack of understanding the reaction mechanisms that gate the formation of one product over another. This talk will describe prospects and recent advances in carbon dioxide valorization that will be essential for realizing a low-carbon energy future.
Read More

2:40 - 3:20

A Cyber Enabled Smart Grid
Accelerated penetration of distributed energy resources (DER) for power generation and demand response (DR), the notion of just-in-time flexible consumption, are enabling the transformation from the current power grid structure to a modernized, cyber-enabled grid. In order to carry out an efficient design of Transactive Systems, a tightly integrated design of wholesale and retail markets and pricing policies is needed that incentivizes end-users' participation, accommodates physical constraints, and enables global objectives through local and distributed decision-making.

This talk will outline how this integrated design of wholesale and retail markets can be carried out. The two streams of research investigations from our lab will be featured: one is a dynamic wholesale market mechanism with the ability to make decisions at multiple time-scales, and the other is a hierarchical architecture capable of achieving volt-var control in the presence of large penetration of DERs and DRs. We will discuss how the results from these can be combined to result in an overall hierarchical Transactive architecture for smart distribution grids.
Read More

3:20 - 3:40

Networking Break

3:40 - 4:20

Control of Phase Transformations in Rechargeable Batteries
The rapid, stable cycling of rechargeable batteries requires well-controlled phase transformations of the redox active materials in each electrode, between the charged and discharged states. In Li-ion batteries, common intercalation materials, such as graphite and iron phosphate, undergo phase separation (into Li-rich and Li-poor phases), which limits the power density and causes degradation. A general mathematical theory, supported by recent x-ray imaging experiments, will be presented that shows how phase separation can be controlled by electro-autocatalytic reactions. For Li-metal batteries, theoretical and experimental results will be presented for the stability of lithium electrodeposition, controlled by electrokinetic phenomena in charged porous separators.
Read More

4:20 - 5:00

Material in Energy: From Nano to Macro
Three material examples will be presented to demonstrate how the fundamental understanding of nanoscale mechanisms can inform and inspire the development of new macroscale materials and devices. These materials include a reversible Li metal anode in battery, ton-scale radiation-resistant metallic nanocomposite, and thermal shock synthesis of high-entropy-alloy nanoparticle catalysts. Recent advances in nano-manipulation, environmental TEM, and MEMS allow us to investigate coupled mechanical and electrochemical phenomena with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolutions. For example, we can now quantitatively characterize liquid-solid and gas-solid interfaces at nm-scale. These experiments greatly complement our modeling efforts, and together they help provide insights into how materials are transformed in synthesis and how they behave in service due to combined electrochemical-mechanical forces. Applying theory, modeling, and lab-on-a-chip microscopy with cost modeling can judiciously guide the scalable production of high-performance energy materials.
Read More

Samberg Conference Center, E52
Dining Room 4

Track 3: Digital Transformation

2:00 - 2:40

Data Ownership Impact on Privacy and Security

2:40 - 3:20

Layer 2 Scalability and Smart Contracts
Layer 2 is currently used as an umbrella term for all operations that are performed “off chain” and use blockchains to settle transactions. This is based on the work of Tadge Dryja, who is one of the authors of the Lightning Network paper, and he continues to lead the DCI’s research in this area. The Lightning Network is one of the first applications of payment channels, and we’re confident we’ll see more. Another application we’ve been working on involves smart contracts. In order to create useful smart contracts, we need oracles, data feeds that verify real-world occurrences and submit this information in a format that can be used in a blockchain.
Read More

3:20 - 3:40

Networking Break

3:40 - 4:20

Building the Internet of Trusted Data
The MIT Trust Data Consortium aims to provide people, organizations, and computers the ability to manage access to their data more securely, efficiently, and equitably, while protecting personal data from incursion and corruption. As we have moved from the analog world to the digital world, our data, security, and governance systems have not kept pace. This has created numerous issues ranging from data insecurity (such as the large-scale government and private sector data losses of recent years) to a widening digital divide between rich and poor, including the global disenfranchisement of over 1.5 billion people who lack legal identity.
Read More

4:20 - 5:00

Blockchain Technology: Some Ground Truths from Finance

Samberg Conference Center, E52
Salon M

Track 4: Nanotechnology in Life Science

2:00 - 2:40

Biologically Inspired Soft and Fluid Optical Materials
A curious look at biological light manipulation concepts reveals a myriad of versatile approaches for the creation of bio-inspired optical materials. Soft and fluid matter, in particular, plays an important role in dynamic biological photonic systems. My research group aims to design, manufacture, and apply dynamic, responsive optical materials and devices. We explore synergies between soft and fluid matter, established and novel optical design concepts, and insights into nature's light manipulation strategies. We center our efforts on three topics: Soft and fluid matter for optical design, strategies for enabling multifunctionality at the materials level, and structure formation in biological optical materials.
Read More

2:40 - 3:20

Toward Nanocrystal Sensors
Our laboratory focuses on the science and applications of nanocrystals, especially semiconductor nanocrystal (aka quantum dots). Our research ranges from the very fundamental to applications in electro-optics and biology. There is an ongoing effort to address the challenges of making new compositions and morphologies of nanocrystals and nanocrystal heterostructures, and new ligands so that the nanocrystals can be incorporated into hybrid organic/inorganic devices, or biological systems. We are collaborating with a number of biology and medical groups to design nanocrystal probes that meet specific challenges.
Read More

3:20 - 3:40

Networking Break

3:40 - 4:20

Intelligent Nucleic Acid Therapeutics
siRNAs, mRNAs, and most recently CRISPR offer entirely new classes of therapeutics that have transformative potential for the treatment of acquired and genetic diseases which are currently untreatable with protein- or small molecule-based drugs. However, a major challenge for the translation of these nucleic acid-based therapeutics to the clinic is their targeted delivery in vivo, which should be both highly specific and have controlled toxicity and immunogenicity. Synthetic nucleic acids can now be designed to replace viral and lipid nanoparticle carriers by encapsulating therapeutic nucleic acid payloads themselves within structured nucleic acid assemblies in order to control their tissue targeting and release properties. In this talk, I will present our platform technology for this purpose, namely designing and synthesizing structured nucleic acid nanoparticles to deliver therapeutic siRNA, mRNA, and CRISPR ribonucleoprotein complexes, as potential replacements for viral vectors and lipid nanoparticles.
Read More

4:20 - 5:00

Giving New Life to Materials for Energy, the Environment, and Medicine
Organisms have been making exquisite inorganic materials for over 500 million years. Although these materials have many desired physical properties such as strength, regularity, and environmentally benign processing, the types of materials that organisms have evolved to work with are limited. However, there are many properties of living systems that could be potentially harnessed by researchers to make advanced technologies that are smarter, more adaptable, and are synthesized to be compatible with the environment. One approach to designing future technologies with properties that can be easily used by living organisms is to evolve the organisms to work with a more diverse set of building blocks. The goal is to have a DNA sequence that codes for the synthesis and assembly of any inorganic material or device. We have been successful in using evolutionarily selected peptides to control physical properties of nanocrystals and subsequently use molecular recognition and self-assembly to design biological hybrid multidimensional materials. These materials could be designed to address many scientific and technological problems in electronics, environmental remediation, medicine, and energy applications. Currently this technology is being used to design new methods for building batteries, fuel cells, solar cells, carbon sequestration and storage, environmental remediation, catalysis, and medical diagnostics and imaging. We will consider the conditions under which organisms first evolved to make materials and scientific approaches which move beyond naturally evolved materials to genetically imprint advanced technologies, including examples in lithium and sodium ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, environmental clean-up, and ovarian cancer imaging and treatment.
Read More

5:00 - 6:30

Samberg Conference Center, E52
Salon I/T

Networking Reception