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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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July 2017
ILP Research Group
Request Research Survey

Construction

ILP Research Survey
Survey of MIT research:


Building design * construction materials * construction process * urban design * concrete * real estate ...




Please note that the ILP RESEARCH SURVEY LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies and that the older the survey is, the more likely that it will contain some inactive projects.

October 2017
MIT Press
Order Book

The Future

Nick Montfort
The future is like an unwritten book. It is not something we see in a crystal ball, or can only hope to predict, like the weather. In this volume of the MIT Press’s Essential Knowledge series, Nick Montfort argues that the future is something to be made, not predicted. Montfort offers what he considers essential knowledge about the future, as seen in the work of writers, artists, inventors, and designers (mainly in Western culture) who developed and described the core components of the futures they envisioned. Montfort’s approach is not that of futurology or scenario planning; instead, he reports on the work of making the future—the thinkers who devoted themselves to writing pages in the unwritten book. Douglas Engelbart, Alan Kay, and Ted Nelson didn't predict the future of computing, for instance. They were three of the people who made it.

Montfort focuses on how the development of technologies—with an emphasis on digital technologies—has been bound up with ideas about the future. Readers learn about kitchens of the future and the vision behind them; literary utopias, from Plato’s Republic to Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland; the Futurama exhibit at the 1939 New York World’s Fair; and what led up to Tim Berners-Lee’s invention of the World Wide Web. Montfort describes the notebook computer as a human-centered alterative to the idea of the computer as a room-sized “giant brain”; speculative practice in design and science fiction; and, throughout, the best ways to imagine and build the future.


About the Author:
Nick Montfort is Professor of Digital Media at MIT. He is the author of Twisty Little Passages: An Approach to Interactive Fiction and Exploratory Programming for the Arts and Humanities; the coauthor of Racing the Beam: The Atari Video Computer System and 10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); : GOTO 10; and the coeditor of The New Media Reader (all published by the MIT Press).


June 2017
ILP Research Group
Request Research Survey

Water

ILP Research Survey
Survey of MIT research:


Agriculture, food & water * desalination, materials, processes * environmental fluid mechanics * energy and water * hydrology, hydroclimatology * monitoring, sensing * designs, innovations for developing world * infrastructure, wetlands ...




Please note that the ILP RESEARCH SURVEY LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies and that the older the survey is, the more likely that it will contain some inactive projects.

May 2017
ILP Research Group
Request Research Survey

Advanced Manufacturing

ILP Research Survey
Survey of MIT research:

3D printing, additive manufacturing, digital fabrication * biomanufacturing * nanomanufacturing * pharmaceutical manufacturing * robotics * sustainability...




Please note that the ILP RESEARCH SURVEY LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies and that the older the survey is, the more likely that it will contain some inactive projects.

May 2017
Princeton University Press
Order Book

Adaptive Markets

Andrew W. Lo
Financial Evolution at the Speed of Thought
A new, evolutionary explanation of markets and investor behavior

Half of all Americans have money in the stock market, yet economists can't agree on whether investors and markets are rational and efficient, as modern financial theory assumes, or irrational and inefficient, as behavioral economists believe—and as financial bubbles, crashes, and crises suggest. This is one of the biggest debates in economics and the value or futility of investment management and financial regulation hang on the outcome. In this groundbreaking book, Andrew Lo cuts through this debate with a new framework, the Adaptive Markets Hypothesis, in which rationality and irrationality coexist.

Drawing on psychology, evolutionary biology, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, and other fields, Adaptive Markets shows that the theory of market efficiency isn't wrong but merely incomplete. When markets are unstable, investors react instinctively, creating inefficiencies for others to exploit. Lo's new paradigm explains how financial evolution shapes behavior and markets at the speed of thought—a fact revealed by swings between stability and crisis, profit and loss, and innovation and regulation.

A fascinating intellectual journey filled with compelling stories, Adaptive Markets starts with the origins of market efficiency and its failures, turns to the foundations of investor behavior, and concludes with practical implications—including how hedge funds have become the Galápagos Islands of finance, what really happened in the 2008 meltdown, and how we might avoid future crises.

An ambitious new answer to fundamental questions in economics, Adaptive Markets is essential reading for anyone who wants to know how markets really work.


About the Author:
Andrew W. Lo is the Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management and director of the MIT Laboratory for Financial Engineering. He is the author of Hedge Funds and the coauthor of A Non-Random Walk Down Wall Street and The Econometrics of Financial Markets (all Princeton). He is also the founder of AlphaSimplex Group, a quantitative investment management company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts.