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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

321 Results | Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | .. | 62 | Page 63 | 64 | Last | Next
 

April 2010
A.K. Peters, Ltd.
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Bright Boys

Tom Green, with Special Foreword by Jay W. Forrester
The Making of Information Technology
MIT Sloan School of Management Professor Emeritus Jay Forrester’s foreword shares insight into the school’s entrepreneurial spirit that helped launch the world of electronics and created the first real-time computer. An original member of MIT’s “bright boy” team, Forrester is a pioneer in early digital computer development and the inventor of random-access magnetic-core memory.

In his foreword, Forrester credits MIT for supporting such creativity in uncharted waters. Forrester writes, “Innovation means trying ideas outside of the accepted pattern. It means providing the opportunity to fail as a learning experience rather than an embarrassment. … An innovative spirit requires years for developing the courage to be different and calibrating oneself to identify the effective region for innovation that lies between the mundane and the impossible.”

Everything has a beginning. None was more profound—and quite unexpected—than Information Technology. Here for the first time is the untold story of how our new age came to be and the bright boys who made it happen. What began on the bare floor of an old laundry building eventually grew to rival in size the Manhattan Project. The unexpected consequence of that journey was huge—what we now know as Information Technology. For sixty years the bright boys have been totally anonymous while their achievements have become a way of life for all of us. “Bright Boys” brings them home. By 1950 they’d built the world’s first real-time computer. Three years later they one-upped themselves when they switched on the world’s first digital network. In 1953 their work was met with incredulity and completely overlooked. By 1968 their work was gospel. Today, it’s the way of the world.


A pioneer in early digital computer development and a member of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, Jay Forrester invented random-access magnetic-core memory during the first wave of modern computers. He also pioneered the growing field of system dynamics. He has researched the behavior of economic systems, including the causes of business cycles and the major depressions; a new type of dynamics-based management education; and system dynamics as a unifying theme in pre-college education. Forrester has received numerous awards for his books and has been awarded nine honorary degrees from universities around the world.

March 2010
Springer
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The Delta Model

Arnoldo C. Hax
Reinventing Your Business Strategy
In today’s challenging economic environment, finding ways to differentiate and grow a business is more important than ever. In a new book, The Delta Model, MIT Sloan School of Management Professor Arnoldo Hax presents a fundamentally new approach to strategy focused on the customer rather than competitors.

“If you focus on competitors as your benchmark then you start to imitate them, which causes congruence in your industry. That is the worst thing that can happen because it leads to lackluster performance, ineffective customer service, and products and services that don’t excite anyone,” says Hax. “The alternative is to concentrate on the customer, which is the premise of The Delta Model.”

Based on more than 30 years of research, teaching, and consulting, Hax offers a unique perspective on management strategy as well as practical tools to help executives successfully implement the Delta Model into their organizations. The model, which applies to small and medium-sized businesses as well as large corporations and nonprofits, builds on existing ideas yet expands and often counters conventional wisdom.



Arnoldo C. Hax is the Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Management Emeritus at the Sloan School of Management of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served as Deputy Dean of the Sloan School from 1987 through 1990. During his career at Sloan School, Professor Hax has been the Chairman of the Strategy Group, the Program for Senior Executives, and the Sloan Fellows Program at MIT.









March 2010
Pantheon Books/Random House
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13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown

Simon Johnson, James Kwak
Even after the ruinous financial crisis of 2008, America is still beset by the depredations of an oligarchy that is now bigger, more profitable, and more resistant to regulation than ever. Anchored by six megabanks—Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, and Morgan Stanley—which together control assets amounting, astonishingly, to more than 60 percent of the country’s gross domestic product, these financial institutions (now more emphatically “too big to fail”) continue to hold the global economy hostage, threatening yet another financial meltdown with their excessive risk-taking and toxic “business as usual” practices. How did this come to be—and what is to be done? These are the central concerns of 13 Bankers, a brilliant, historically informed account of our troubled political economy.

In 13 Bankers, Simon Johnson—one of the most prominent and frequently cited economists in America (former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund, Professor of Entrepreneurship at MIT, and author of the controversial “The Quiet Coup” in The Atlantic)—and James Kwak give a wide-ranging, meticulous, and bracing account of recent U.S. financial history within the context of previous showdowns between American democracy and Big Finance: from Thomas Jefferson to Andrew Jackson, from Theodore Roosevelt to Franklin Delano Roosevelt. They convincingly show why our future is imperiled by the ideology of finance (finance is good, unregulated finance is better, unfettered finance run amok is best) and by Wall Street’s political control of government policy pertaining to it.

As the authors insist, the choice that America faces is stark: whether Washington will accede to the vested interests of an unbridled financial sector that runs up profits in good years and dumps its losses on taxpayers in lean years, or reform through stringent regulation the banking system as first and foremost an engine of economic growth. To restore health and balance to our economy, Johnson and Kwak make a radical yet feasible and focused proposal: reconfigure the megabanks to be “small enough to fail.”

Simon Johnson is Ronald A. Kurtz Professor of Entrepreneurship at MIT’s Sloan School of Management and a senior fellow of the Peterson Institute for International Economics. He is coauthor, with James Kwak, of The Baseline Scenario, a leading economic blog, described by Paul Krugman as “a must-read” and by Bill Moyers as “one of the most informative news sites in the blogosphere.”

March 2010
MIT Press
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Reinventing the Automobile

William J. Mitchell, Christopher E. Borroni-Bird
and Lawrence D. Burns
Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century
This book provides a long-overdue vision for a new automobile era. The cars we drive today follow the same underlying design principles as the Model Ts of a hundred years ago and the tail-finned sedans of fifty years ago. In the twenty-first century, cars are still made for twentieth-century purposes. They're well suited for conveying multiple passengers over long distances at high speeds, but inefficient for providing personal mobility within cities—where most of the world's people now live. In this pathbreaking book, William Mitchell and two industry experts reimagine the automobile, describing vehicles of the near future that are green, smart, connected, and fun to drive. They roll out four big ideas that will make this both feasible and timely.

First, we must transform the DNA of the automobile, basing it on electric-drive and wireless communication rather than on petroleum, the internal combustion engine, and stand-alone operation. This allows vehicles to become lighter, cleaner, and "smart" enough to avoid crashes and traffic jams. Second, automobiles need to be linked by a Mobility Internet that allows them to collect and share data on traffic conditions, intelligently coordinates their movements, and keeps drivers connected to their social networks. Third, automobiles must be recharged through a convenient, cost-effective infrastructure that is integrated with smart electric grids and makes increasing use of renewable energy sources. Finally, dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles must be introduced to provide optimum management of urban mobility and energy systems.

The fundamental reinvention of the automobile won't be easy, but it is an urgent necessity—to make urban mobility more convenient and sustainable, to make cities more livable, and to help bring the automobile industry out of crisis.

Four Big Ideas That Could Transform the Automobile:
  • Base the underlying design principles on electric-drive and wireless communications rather than the internal combustion engine and stand-alone operation
  • Develop the Mobility Internet for sharing traffic and travel data
  • Integrate electric-drive vehicles with smart electric grids that use clean, renewable energy sources
  • Establish dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles

March 2010
Harvard University Press
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Brand New China

Jing Wang
Advertising, Media, and Commercial Culture
One part riveting account of fieldwork and one part rigorous academic study, Brand New China offers a unique perspective on the advertising and marketing culture of China. Jing Wang’s experiences in the disparate worlds of Beijing advertising agencies and the U.S. academy allow her to share a unique perspective on China during its accelerated reintegration into the global market system.

Brand New China offers a detailed, penetrating, and up-to-date portrayal of branding and advertising in contemporary China. Wang takes us inside an advertising agency to show the influence of American branding theories and models. She also examines the impact of new media practices on Chinese advertising, deliberates on the convergence of grassroots creative culture and viral marketing strategies, samples successful advertising campaigns, provides practical insights about Chinese consumer segments, and offers methodological reflections on pop culture and advertising research.

Jing Wang is S. C. Fang Professor of Chinese Language and Culture at MIT, Chair of the International Advisory Board of Creative Commons China Mainland, and the author of High Culture Fever and The Story of Stone.