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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

318 Results | Prev | 1 | 2 | Page 3 | 4 | .. | 62 | 63 | Last | Next
 

October 2017
MIT Press
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The Largest Art

Brent D. Ryan
A Measured Manifesto for a Plural Urbanism
Urban design in practice is incremental, but architects imagine it as scaled-up architecture—large, ready-to-build pop-up cities. This paradox of urban design is rarely addressed; indeed, urban design as a discipline lacks a theoretical foundation. In The Largest Art, Brent Ryan argues that urban design encompasses more than architecture, and he provides a foundational theory of urban design beyond the architectural scale. In a “declaration of independence” for urban design, Ryan describes urban design as the largest of the building arts, with qualities of its own.

Ryan distinguishes urban design from its sister arts by its pluralism: plural scale, ranging from an alleyway to a region; plural time, because it is deeply enmeshed in both history and the present; plural property, with many owners; plural agents, with many makers; and plural form, with a distributed quality that allows it to coexist with diverse elements of the city. Ryan looks at three well-known urban design projects through the lens of pluralism: a Brancusi sculptural ensemble in Romania, a Bronx housing project, and a formally and spatially diverse grouping of projects in Ljubljana, Slovenia. He revisits the thought of three plural urbanists working between 1960 and 1980: David Crane, Edmund Bacon, and Kevin Lynch. And he tells three design stories for the future, imaginary scenarios of plural urbanism in locations around the world.

Ryan concludes his manifesto with three signal considerations urban designers must acknowledge: eternal change, inevitable incompletion, and flexible fidelity. Cities are ceaselessly active, perpetually changing. It is the urban designer’s task to make art with aesthetic qualities that can survive perpetual change.



About the Author:

Brent D. Ryan is Associate Professor of Urban Design and Planning and Head, City Design and Development Group, Chair, PhD Program, at MIT.

December 2017
MIT Press
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Advanced Manufacturing

William B. Bonvillian and Peter L. Singer
The New American Innovation Policies
The United States lost almost one-third of its manufacturing jobs between 2000 and 2010. As higher-paying manufacturing jobs are replaced by lower-paying service jobs, income inequality has been approaching third world levels. In particular, between 1990 and 2013, the median income of white men without high school diplomas fell by an astonishing 20% between 1990 and 2013, and that of men with high school diplomas or some college fell by a painful 13%. Innovation has been left largely to software and IT startups, which operate on a system of “innovate here/produce there,” leaving the manufacturing sector behind. In this book, William Bonvillian and Peter Singer explore how to rethink innovation and revitalize America’s declining manufacturing sector. They argue that advanced manufacturing, which employs such innovative technologies as 3-D printing, advanced material, photonics, and robotics in the production process, is the key.

Bonvillian and Singer discuss transformative new production paradigms that could drive up efficiency and drive down costs, describe the new processes and business models that must accompany them, and explore alternative funding methods for startups that must manufacture. They examine the varied attitudes of mainstream economics toward manufacturing, the post-Great Recession policy focus on advanced manufacturing, and lessons from the new advanced manufacturing institutes. They consider the problem of “startup scaleup,” possible new models for training workers, and the role of manufacturing in addressing “secular stagnation” in innovation, growth, the middle classes, productivity rates, and related investment. As recent political turmoil shows, the stakes could not be higher.

About the Authors:

William B. Bonvillian is a Lecturer at MIT, former Director of MIT’s Washington, D.C., office, and the coauthor of Structuring an Energy Technology Revolution (MIT Press).
Peter L. Singer served as a policy adviser at MIT’s Washington Office.

October 2017
MIT Press
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Programming for the Puzzled

Srini Devadas
Learn to Program While Solving Puzzles
This book builds a bridge between the recreational world of algorithmic puzzles (puzzles that can be solved by algorithms) and the pragmatic world of computer programming, teaching readers to program while solving puzzles. Few introductory students want to program for programming’s sake. Puzzles are real-world applications that are attention grabbing, intriguing, and easy to describe.

Each lesson starts with the description of a puzzle. After a failed attempt or two at solving the puzzle, the reader arrives at an Aha! moment—a search strategy, data structure, or mathematical fact—and the solution presents itself. The solution to the puzzle becomes the specification of the code to be written. Readers will thus know what the code is supposed to do before seeing the code itself. This represents a pedagogical philosophy that decouples understanding the functionality of the code from understanding programming language syntax and semantics. Python syntax and semantics required to understand the code are explained as needed for each puzzle.

Readers need only the rudimentary grasp of programming concepts that can be obtained from introductory or AP computer science classes in high school. The book includes more than twenty puzzles and more than seventy programming exercises that vary in difficulty. Many of the puzzles are well known and have appeared in publications and on websites in many variations. They range from scheduling selfie time with celebrities to solving Sudoku problems in seconds to verifying the six degrees of separation hypothesis. The code for selected puzzle solutions is downloadable from the book’s website; the code for all puzzle solutions is available to instructors.



About the Author:

Srini Devadas is Webster Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and a MacVicar Fellow.

August 2017
ILP Research Group
Request Research Survey

Consumer Behavior

ILP Research Survey
Survey of MIT research:

Retail, retailers * consumer-driven service * age differences * trust * peer effects * digital marketing * preferences * purchase behavior * spending behavior....




Please note that the ILP RESEARCH SURVEY LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies and that the older the survey is, the more likely that it will contain some inactive projects.

November 2017
Public Affairs
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The Longevity Economy

Joseph F. Coughlin
Inside the World's Fastest-Growing, Most Misunderstood Market
As the director of the MIT AgeLab, Joseph Coughlin has studied trends in demographics and technology and spearheaded research and innovation to improve the quality of life for older people and those who care for them. Now, in The Longevity Economy, he uses this expertise to break new ground in understanding this market, which composes an ever-increasing share of the total population.

While companies see the size and wealth of this market, they all too often use outdated narratives to figure out what this demographic really wants. Coughlin debunks conventional wisdom and provides the framing needed to be in sync with this influential and lucrative market. He uses fascinating examples from a wide variety of sectors, from financial services to housing, health care, consumer products, and personal relationships. He showcases the work of companies like PillPack, an online pharmacy that delivers presorted medicine to your home; OXO, which makes ergonomic utensils; and edX, an online learning platform that makes it easy for older people to learn from home.

Coughlin's insights will help businesses connect with older consumers, who continue to defy expectations, contribute to economic growth, and build a better, enduring vision of old age.


About the Author:
Joseph Coughlin is the founder and director of the MIT AgeLab, a multidisciplinary research program created to understand the behavior of the 50+ population, the role of technology in their lives, and the opportunity for innovation to improve the quality of life for older adults and their families. He is a member of the board of directors of AARP, AARP Services, and Benchmark Senior Living.