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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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October 2017
ILP Research Group
Request Research Survey

Wearable Robotics

ILP Research Survey
Survey of MIT research including such topics as:

Supernumerary robotic fingers * robotic limbs * wearable robotic simulator * bionic ankle * exoskeleton * motion controller * miniature on-body robots...





Please note that the ILP RESEARCH SURVEY LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies and that the older the survey is, the more likely that it will contain some inactive projects.

September 2017
ILP Research Group
Request Research Survey

Robotics

ILP Research Survey
Survey of MIT research:

Aerospace robotics * soft robotics * distributed robotics * interactive robotics * marine robotics * robot locomotion * biomechatronics * biomimetic robotics * mobility * unmanned vehicles * human-robot teaming...




Please note that the ILP RESEARCH SURVEY LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies and that the older the survey is, the more likely that it will contain some inactive projects.

September 2017
ILP Research Group
Request Research Survey

Sensors: Health/Medical

ILP Research Survey
Survey of MIT research:

Miniaturized NMR neurotransmitter sensors * metalloneurochemistry * microfluidic mass sensor arrays * implantable * wireless signals * thin-film transistors * materials ...



Please note that the ILP RESEARCH SURVEY LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies and that the older the survey is, the more likely that it will contain some inactive projects.

August 2017
Penguin Random House
Order Book

Life 3.0

Max Tegmark
Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence
How will Artificial Intelligence affect crime, war, justice, jobs, society and our very sense of being human? The rise of AI has the potential to transform our future more than any other technology—and there’s nobody better qualified or situated to explore that future than Max Tegmark, an MIT professor who’s helped mainstream research on how to keep AI beneficial.

How can we grow our prosperity through automation without leaving people lacking income or purpose? What career advice should we give today’s kids? How can we make future AI systems more robust, so that they do what we want without crashing, malfunctioning or getting hacked? Should we fear an arms race in lethal autonomous weapons? Will machines eventually outsmart us at all tasks, replacing humans on the job market and perhaps altogether? Will AI help life flourish like never before or give us more power than we can handle?

What sort of future do you want? This book empowers you to join what may be the most important conversation of our time. It doesn’t shy away from the full range of viewpoints or from the most controversial issues—from superintelligence to meaning, consciousness and the ultimate physical limits on life in the cosmos.



About the Author:
Max Tegmark is a Professor of Physics at MIT and the co-founder of the Future of Life Institute. Tegmark has been featured in dozens of science documentaries. His passion for ideas, adventure, and entrepreneurship is infectious.

October 2017
MIT Press
Order Book

The Largest Art

Brent D. Ryan
A Measured Manifesto for a Plural Urbanism
Urban design in practice is incremental, but architects imagine it as scaled-up architecture—large, ready-to-build pop-up cities. This paradox of urban design is rarely addressed; indeed, urban design as a discipline lacks a theoretical foundation. In The Largest Art, Brent Ryan argues that urban design encompasses more than architecture, and he provides a foundational theory of urban design beyond the architectural scale. In a “declaration of independence” for urban design, Ryan describes urban design as the largest of the building arts, with qualities of its own.

Ryan distinguishes urban design from its sister arts by its pluralism: plural scale, ranging from an alleyway to a region; plural time, because it is deeply enmeshed in both history and the present; plural property, with many owners; plural agents, with many makers; and plural form, with a distributed quality that allows it to coexist with diverse elements of the city. Ryan looks at three well-known urban design projects through the lens of pluralism: a Brancusi sculptural ensemble in Romania, a Bronx housing project, and a formally and spatially diverse grouping of projects in Ljubljana, Slovenia. He revisits the thought of three plural urbanists working between 1960 and 1980: David Crane, Edmund Bacon, and Kevin Lynch. And he tells three design stories for the future, imaginary scenarios of plural urbanism in locations around the world.

Ryan concludes his manifesto with three signal considerations urban designers must acknowledge: eternal change, inevitable incompletion, and flexible fidelity. Cities are ceaselessly active, perpetually changing. It is the urban designer’s task to make art with aesthetic qualities that can survive perpetual change.



About the Author:

Brent D. Ryan is Associate Professor of Urban Design and Planning and Head, City Design and Development Group, Chair, PhD Program, at MIT.