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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

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August 2014
ILP Research Group
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RESEARCH REPORT LIST

ILP Research Group
This list is a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies. The list includes reports from 2012 to present and is updated regularly.

Forthcoming September 2014
The MIT Press
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Keynes

Peter Temin and David Vines
Useful Economics for the World Economy
As the global economic crisis continues to cause damage, some policy makers have called for a more Keynesian approach to current economic problems. In this book, the economists Peter Temin and David Vines provide an accessible introduction to Keynesian ideas that connects Keynes’s insights to today’s global economy and offers readers a way to understand current policy debates.

John Maynard Keynes (1883–1946) created the branch of economics now known as macroeconomics. He played a major role in the reconstruction of Europe and the world economy after the Second World War. Keynesian economics came to be identified with efforts to mitigate the Great Depression and with postwar economic policies that helped power a golden age of economic growth. Temin and Vines argue that Keynes also provided a way to understand the interactions among nations, and therein lies his relevance for today’s global crisis.

Temin and Vines survey economic thinking before Keynes and explain how difficult it was for Keynes to escape from conventional wisdom. They set out the Keynesian analysis of a closed economy and expand the analysis to the international economy, using a few simple graphs to present Keynes’s formal analyses in an accessible way. They discuss problems of today’s world economy, showcasing the usefulness of a simple Keynesian approach to current economic policy choices. Keynesian ideas, they argue, can lay the basis for a return to economic growth.


About the Authors:

Peter Temin is Elisha Gray II Professor Emeritus of Economics at MIT and the author of Lessons from the Great Depression (MIT Press) and other books. Temin and Vines are coauthors of The Leaderless Economy: Why the World Economic System Fell Apart and How to Fix It.

David Vines is Professor of Economics and Fellow of Balliol College at the University of Oxford, and joint editor of a number of books on global economic governance. Temin and Vines are coauthors of The Leaderless Economy: Why the World Economic System Fell Apart and How to Fix It.

June 2014
Hoover Institution Press
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Game Changers

George P. Schultz & Robert C. Armstrong (Eds.)
Energy on the Move
The United States needs reliable and inexpensive energy to propel our economy and protect our national security interests. Game Changers presents five research and development efforts from US universities that offer a cheaper, cleaner, and more secure national energy system. Drawing from the efforts of Stanford, MIT, and other leading university research centers, the book describes some of the innovations that are transforming our energy landscape: natural gas from shale, solar photovoltaics, grid-scale electricity storage, electric cars, and LED lighting.

For each innovation, the authors detail the fruits of individual research and development projects that are available today, near at hand, or on the horizon. They also show how extreme energy reliability and performance demands have put the US military at the leading edge of driving energy innovations and survey potentially game-changing energy technologies being used by the US Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force on bases and in forward deployments.

The more choices our laboratories put on the table, the more we are able to use them to reach the things we really care about: health, family, business, culture, faith, and delight, which is what game changers are ultimately about.


About the Editors:

George P. Shultz is the Thomas W. and Susan B. Ford Distinguished Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.

Robert C. Armstrong is the director of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI) and the Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT.

Contributors include:

Jeremy Carl is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution and director of research for the Shultz-Stephenson Task Force on Energy Policy.
Louis Carranza is associate director of MITEI.
David Fedor is a research analyst on the Hoover Institution’s Shultz-Stephenson Task Force on Energy Policy.
Rebecca Marshall-Howarth is MITEI's editorial services and publications director.
Francis O’Sullivan is MITEI's director of research and analysis and a lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management.
Commander David Slayton is a Hoover Institution research fellow, cochair of the Arctic Security Initiative, and a member of the Task Force on Energy Policy.

August 2014
ILP Research Group
Request Research Report

Internet of Things

ILP Research Report
Survey of MIT research including such topics as:

Smart grids * privacy and security * the connected home * RFID positioning * backscatter networks * web of things * wide area sensor networks * self-powered wireless sensors ...



Please note that not all ILP research reports are posted online. The main ILP RESEARCH REPORT LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies. The reports vary from formal to more informal formats. The list includes reports from 2012 to present and is updated regularly.

June 2014
The MIT Press
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The Social Machine

Judith Donath
Designs for Living Online
Computers were first conceived as “thinking machines,” but in the twenty-first century they have become social machines, online places where people meet friends, play games, and collaborate on projects. In this book, Judith Donath argues persuasively that for social media to become truly sociable media, we must design interfaces that reflect how we understand and respond to the social world. People and their actions are still harder to perceive online than face to face: interfaces are clunky, and we have less sense of other people’s character and intentions, where they congregate, and what they do.

Donath presents new approaches to creating interfaces for social interaction. She addresses such topics as visualizing social landscapes, conversations, and networks; depicting identity with knowledge markers and interaction history; delineating public and private space; and bringing the online world’s open sociability into the physical world. Donath asks fundamental questions about how we want to live online and offers thought-provoking designs that explore radically new ways of interacting and communicating.


About the Author:

Judith Donath is a Faculty Fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society and a Visiting Scholar at MIT’s Program in Science, Technology, and Society.