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RECENT PUBLICATIONS

328 Results | Page 1 | 2 | 3 | .. | 64 | 65 | Last | Next
 

May 2016
ILP Research Group
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RESEARCH SURVEYS - TOPICS LIST

ILP Research Group
This list is a guide to MIT ILP research surveys on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies. The list includes research surveys from 2014 to present and is updated regularly.

May 2016
ILP Research
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MIT and the Financial/Banking Industries

ILP Industry Brief
• Banks, Economy, Policy, Regulations
• Big Data, Computation, Analysis
• Currency
• Cybersecurity, Cryptography, Data Security
• Digital Economy
• Economics and Management
• Entrepreneurship, Venture Capital
• Finance, Financial Engineering
• Global Development, Local Innovation Systems
• Real Estate
• Social Networks, Collaborative Intelligence, Mobility

May 2016
ILP Research Group
Request Research Survey

Drug Delivery

ILP Research Survey
Survey of MIT research:

Implantable drug-delivery device * particles for modular drug delivery * formulating future vaccines * hydrogel * targeted system * nanoemulsions * polymers...




Please note that the ILP RESEARCH SURVEY LIST serves as a guide to MIT research on topics that have been of interest to ILP member companies and that the older the survey is, the more likely that it will contain some inactive projects.

Forthcoming October 2016
The MIT Press
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Free Innovation

Eric von Hippel
In this book, Eric von Hippel, author of the influential Democratizing Innovation, integrates new theory and research findings into the framework of a “free innovation paradigm.” Free innovation, as he defines it, involves innovations developed by consumers who are self-rewarded for their efforts, and who give their designs away “for free.” It is an inherently simple grassroots innovation process, unencumbered by compensated transactions and intellectual property rights.

Free innovation is already widespread in national economies and is steadily increasing in both scale and scope. Today, tens of millions of consumers are collectively spending tens of billions of dollars annually on innovation development. However, because free innovations are developed during consumers’ unpaid, discretionary time and are given away rather than sold, their collective impact and value have until very recently been hidden from view. This has caused researchers, governments, and firms to focus too much on the Schumpeterian idea of innovation as a producer-dominated activity.

Free innovation has both advantages and drawbacks. Because free innovators are self-rewarded by such factors as personal utility, learning, and fun, they often pioneer new areas before producers see commercial potential. At the same time, because they give away their innovations, free innovators generally have very little incentive to invest in diffusing what they create, which reduces the social value of their efforts.

The best solution, von Hippel and his colleagues argue, is a division of labor between free innovators and producers, enabling each to do what they do best. The result will be both increased producer profits and increased social welfare—a gain for all.



About the Author

Eric von Hippel, the T. Wilson (1953) Professor of Technological Innovation at the MIT Sloan School of Management, is a leading research scholar on the economics and management of free, open, and distributed innovation.

Forthcoming December 2016
The MIT Press
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Innovating

Luis Perez-Breva
Forward by Edward Roberts
A Doer's Manifesto for Starting from a Hunch, Prototyping Problems, Scaling Up, and Learning to be Productively Wrong
Innovation is the subject of countless books and courses, but there’s very little out there about how you actually innovate. Innovation and entrepreneurship are not one and the same, although aspiring innovators often think of them that way. They are told to get an idea and a team and to build a show-and-tell for potential investors. In Innovating, Luis Perez-Breva describes another approach—a doer’s approach developed over a decade at MIT and internationally in workshops, classes, and companies. He shows that to start innovating it doesn’t require an earth-shattering idea; all it takes is a hunch. Anyone can do it. By prototyping a problem and learning by being wrong, innovating can be scaled up to make an impact. Perez-Breva shows at the outset of what we later celebrate as “innovations” nothing is new.

In Innovating, the process—illustrated by unique and dynamic artwork—is shown to be empirical, experimental, nonlinear, and incremental. You give your hunch the structure of a problem. Anything can be a part. Your innovating accrues other people’s knowledge and skills. Perez-Breva describes how to create a kit for innovating, and outlines questions that will help you think in new ways. Finally, he shows how to systematize what you’ve learned: to advocate, communicate, scale up, manage innovating continuously, and document—“you need a notebook to converse with yourself,” he advises. Everyone interested in innovating also needs to read this book.



About the Author

Luis Perez-Breva, an innovator and entrepreneur, is a Lecturer and a Research Scientist at MIT’s School of Engineering and the originator and Lead Instructor of the MIT Innovation Teams Program.