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RECENT VIDEOS

11 Results | Last Page
 

03.30.2017
39 mins
ILP Video

Cities That Learn About Us

Carlo Ratti
Associate Professor of the Practice
Director, SENSEable City Laboratory
Director, MIT-Italy Program (MISTI)
MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning
The increasing deployment of sensors and hand-held electronics in recent years is allowing a new approach to the study of the built environment. The way we describe and understand cities is being radically transformed - alongside the tools we use to design them and impact on their physical structure. The contribution from Prof. Carlo Ratti will address these issues from a critical point of view through projects by the Senseable City Laboratory, a research initiative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the design office Carlo Ratti Associati.
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03.30.2017
40 mins
ILP Video

TRANSFORM: Beyond Pixels, Towards Radical Atoms

Hiroshi Ishii
Jerome B. Wiesner Professor of Media Arts and Sciences
Associate Director of MIT Media Laboratory
Director of Tangible Media Group
MIT Media Lab
Whereas today's mainstream Human Computer Interaction (HCI) research addresses functional concerns – the needs of users, practical applications, and usability evaluation – Tangible Bits and Radical Atoms are driven by vision. This is because today's technologies will become obsolete in one year, and today's applications will be replaced in 10 years, but true visions – we believe – can last longer than 100 years.

Tangible Bits seeks to realize seamless interfaces between humans, digital information, and the physical environment by giving physical form to digital information, making bits directly manipulable and perceptible. Our goal is to invent new design media for artistic expression as well as for scientific analysis, taking advantage of the richness of human senses and skills – as developed through our lifetime of interaction with the physical world.

Radical Atoms takes a leap beyond Tangible Bits by assuming a hypothetical generation of materials that can change form and properties dynamically, becoming as reconfigurable as pixels on a screen. Radical Atoms is the future material that can transform its’ shape, conform to constraints, and inform the users of their affordances. Radical Atoms is a vision for the future of human-material interaction, in which all digital information has a physical manifestation so that we can interact directly with it.

I will present the trajectory of our vision-driven design research from Tangible Bits towards Radical Atoms, and a variety of interaction design projects that were presented and exhibited in Arts, Design, and Science communities.
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03.30.2017
30 mins
ILP Video

Autonomy in the Open - Click Here to Download

Michael Benjamin
Research Scientist
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Three trends are changing how unmanned underwater and surface vehicles are viewed and used by the science, DoD and industry. First, the improvement in the cost/performance ratio means these systems are no longer exclusive to larger organizations. Second, the vehicles themselves are smaller, easier to use and deploying them no longer requires access to an expensive research vessel. The third trend is that acoustic communication in the sub-surface domain opens the door for collaboration between vehicles to perhaps observe larger areas in less time, and to use multiple vehicles to sense phenomena not easily sensed with a single vehicle. These trends present a research challenge in the autonomy algorithms needed to reach the potential of unmanned marine systems. The challenge concerns the algorithms themselves, which need to accommodate the collaborative, adaptive, long-term missions of ocean observation. It also concerns the nature in which autonomy algorithms and sofware are developed across the rapidly growing and distributed science community putting these systems to work.
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03.30.2017
54 mins
ILP Video

Let's Get Personal: Millennials and Custom Consumer Experiences

Federico Casalegno
Associate Professor of the Practice
Director, MIT Mobile Experience Lab
MIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing
Empowered by ubiquitous information technology, the generation that has come of age in the digital era has learned a very different consumer experience than their parents. From media and financial services to hospitality and transportation, Millennials expect flexibility and responsiveness across sectors to customize their transactions to fit their needs as individuals. Those expectations may only grow as the exchange of data between consumers and sellers continues expanding, fostering even greater personalization through the emergence of bioproducts.
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03.29.2017
39 mins
ILP Video

Additive Manufacturing Across Scales

John Hart
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Because new additive technologies are more deployable by small shops, they offer a game changing paradigm to open new markets for locally made, customized products. "It will be interesting to see how that affects the dynamics of craft fabrication and localized manufacturing, enabled by digital sharing of designs," says Jonathan Hart, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. "If you want to get something made, if the process to make it can be completely digitized, does it matter where it's made or who makes it?" The emerging capability to print pretty much any shape you want, with some limitations, out of plastic and other materials, means that we can think of small-volume manufacturing of a variety of customized objects and products, from phone cases to lifesaving objects enabling new medical treatments. Although he's keeping details under wraps, Hart says his group is working on innovative concepts for macro-scale additive manufacturing: ?How do you make the process of 3-D printing 10 or 100 times faster at one-tenth of the current cost?"
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03.29.2017
40 mins
ILP Video

Innovation & Failure. The Basis for Building the Future

Bernd Ebersberger
Professor for Economics and Management of Innovation
MCI Management Center Innsbruck
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03.29.2017
29 mins
ILP Video

Can We Be Everywhere, All the Time, with Small Autonomous Satellites?

Kerri Cahoy
Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics
MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
What if you could view and connect with any place on Earth at any time you wanted without any restrictions? The small satellite revolution is making rapid global access a reality. It all started with the idea that you could put at tiny ?stowaway? CubeSat in a spring-loaded box on a rocket, keeping it safely contained on an otherwise unaffordable ride to space. The resulting paradigm shift in the satellite industry has slashed the cost of access to space over the past decade, enabled rapid innovation and miniaturization of space technology, and upended an industry once legendary for its reliance on heritage, risk-aversion, and glacial pace of technology development. Constellations of hundreds of small satellites are soaring above us, replenished regularly with even more advanced units. We are quickly working to teach them to communicate with each other, self-organize, and efficiently manage their limited onboard resources. Trailblazing efforts to automate spacecraft operations and data recovery, network with crosslinks between spacecraft, move decision-making processes from humans on the ground to intelligent onboard algorithms, and reduce the cost of ground stations are catapulting us toward real-time global access. What if you could monitor your crop growth and harvest times, optimize product transportation, analyze and adapt in real time to customer demands and response to incentives, gather and make decisions on embedded sensor data over a wide region, keep tabs on the competition, and securely exchange financial and logistical information? Imagine the commercial and personal benefits, as well as risks, of having the power to inexpensively be everywhere, all the time.
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03.29.2017
38 mins
ILP Video

What If Your Smart Phone Didn?t Need The Cloud?

Vivienne Sze
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
What if you could bring the functionality of a neural network running on a high power GPU to your cell phone or embedded devices, and you could still operate even if you didn?t have a Wi-Fi connection? What if vehicles, appliances, civil-engineering structures, manufacturing equipment, and even livestock would have sensors that report information directly to networked servers aiding with maintenance and task coordination? And, what if with powerful artificial-intelligence algorithms on board, networked devices could make important decisions locally, entrusting only their conclusions, rather than raw personal data, to the Internet? MIT researchers have created a new chip designed specifically to implement neural networks that is 10 times more efficient than a mobile GPU, so it can enable mobile devices to run powerful artificial-intelligence algorithms locally, rather than uploading data to the Internet for processing. The new chip, dubbed ?Eyeriss,? is a potentially game-changing advance that stands to usher in the age of the ?Internet of Things? and a revolution to truly autonomous battery-powered robots.
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03.29.2017
37 mins
ILP Video

Wire Less Sensors

Steve Leeb
Professor of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
When did it become normal for unprecedented quantities of data about you to automatically become the property of others? Why have we returned to a "server" model of information exchange for so many of our data services, reminiscent in ways of the early days of mainframe computing, where "someone else" is responsible for data security and service availability? Much of the current thinking for making systems ?smart? about their operation and energy consumption recapitulates old ideas with new technological varnish. Most approaches involve a decentralized network of sensors, and an old dilemma is becoming increasingly apparent. While networking provides remote access to information and control inputs, gathering useful information may require the installation of an expensive and intrusive array of sensors. And delivering actionable information economically to the right eyes while preventing revelations to the wrong eyes has become an endemic problem. The laboratory of Professor Steven Leeb is considering approaches for developing nonintrusive sensors that are relatively easy to install. He will explore approaches for deploying and coordinating the operation of new sensors to secure data, minimize the need for communication bandwidth, and ensure the presentation of actionable information for enhancing system operation. The approaches are provocative and suggest alternative approaches for commercial products and services.
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03.29.2017
31 mins
ILP Video

Digital Twins: Do you have ghosts in your portfolio?

Donna Rhodes
Principal Research Scientist, Sociotechnical Systems Research Center
Director, Systems Engineering Advancement Research Initiative
MIT Sociotechnical Systems Research Center (SSRC)
Envision a future where every product has a digital equivalent. This is already a reality for some products and systems, such as jet aircraft, wind turbines, and commercial ships. This digital replica, or Digital Twin, radically changes how products are designed, maintained and operated. Rather than using traditional documents and drawings, a product emerges as a result of weaving the digital thread of models, data and knowledge. Once operational, any upgrades or maintenance activities are conducted first in the digital twin, tested and validated, and then implemented in the product. And with the availability of big data and the science of visual analytics, real-time analysis of behavior can be used to make operational decisions regarding the product. Under this new paradigm, the digital twin possesses all of the encoded knowledge concerning the product from its inception to current use?and this inverts the relative value of model and product. A competitor can re-engineer a product to some degree, but possessing a digital twin allows it to be replicated exactly. The most valuable IP, then, becomes the digital twin rather than the products themselves. This brings into question whether the digital model exists independently of the physical product, as a ?ghost in the machine?, or that model and product co-exist, essentially as conjoined twins. Many benefits arise from this coupling, including efficiencies and effectiveness. The promise of the digital twin means that competitive advantage will go to those who eliminate the ghosts in the portfolio, by treating assets as the inseparable coupling of the product with its digital twin.
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03.29.2017
38 mins
ILP Video

Engineering Reverse Innovations: Using Emerging Markets Constraints to Drive the Creation of High-Performance, Low-Cost, Global Technologies

Amos Winter
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Director, Global Engineering and Research (GEAR) Lab
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
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