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April 20, 2018

BROWSE NEWS RESULTS

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ILP Insider
August 10, 2011

Call to Action: Nominate an innovator in your company for the Lemelson-MIT Innovation Awards

The Lemelson-MIT Program invites members of the Industrial Liaison Program to nominate individuals for the 2012 Lemelson-MIT Innovation Awards. A winning nomination will raise awareness of mid career inventors and bring recognition to the both the nominator’s and the nominee’s company. The Lemelson-MIT Innovation Awards celebrate outstanding innovators who enhance economic and community well-being through their inventive work. We particularly seek nominations of individuals working in private industry and encourage nominations of women and members of under-represented groups.

$500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize
honors an outstanding mid-career innovator who has developed a patented product or process of significant value to society, which has been or has the potential for adoption.

$100,000 Lemelson-MIT Global Innovation recognizes innovators whose work enhances economic opportunities and community well-being in developing countries.

Deadline for nominations is October 4, 2011. Questions? Please contact Edward Canton at lemelson_awards@mit.edu or 617-452-2145. Support individuals in your company and nominate an outstanding inventor!
MIT Research News
August 10, 2011

New Drug Could Cure Nearly Any Viral Infection

Researchers at MIT's Lincoln Lab have developed technology that may someday cure the common cold, influenza and other ailments.
Most bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics such as penicillin, discovered decades ago. However, such drugs are useless against viral infections, including influenza, the common cold, and deadly hemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola.

Now, in a development that could transform how viral infections are treated, a team of researchers at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory has designed a drug that can identify cells that have been infected by any type of virus, then kill those cells to terminate the infection.
Read Full Article at MIT News Office
MIT Research News
August 10, 2011

On Thin Ice

The most recent global climate report fails to capture the reality of the changing Arctic seascape, according to MIT researchers.
The Arctic — a mosaic of oceans, glaciers and the northernmost projections of several countries — is a place most of us will never see. We can imagine it, though, and our mental picture is dominated by one feature: ice.

Yet the Arctic sea ice is changing dramatically, and its presence shouldn’t be taken for granted, even over the course of our lifetimes.

According to new research from MIT, the most recent global climate report fails to capture trends in Arctic sea-ice thinning and drift, and in some cases substantially underestimates these trends. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report, released in 2007, forecasts an ice-free Arctic summer by the year 2100, among other predictions. But Pierre Rampal, a postdoc in the Department of Earth, Atmosphere, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS), and colleagues say it may happen several decades earlier.

Read Full Article at MIT News Office
Technology Review
August 10, 2011

Offices for the Taking

A new crop of applications is making it possible for mobile workers to rent office space on the fly.
A new crop of applications is making it possible for mobile workers to rent office space on the fly.
Technology Review
August 9, 2011

Status Update: What's Facebook's Effect on Kids?

Psychologists see good and bad in social networks. On the bad side, possible links to psychiatric disorders; on the good side, increased empathy.
Some parents wonder if Facebook could be harming our ability to socialize. A handful of psychologists are now starting to ask same the question. Larry Rosen, author of several books on the psychology of technology, and a research psychologist at California State University, Dominguez Hills, is one of several researchers trying to quantify the psychological effects that Facebook is having on users across generations, with a particular eye toward teens and young adults.
Technology Review
August 9, 2011

Energy Storage for Solar Power

Startup Brightsource announces a new system that could allow future solar plants to run at night.
Brightsource Energy has become the latest solar thermal power company to develop a system for generating power when the sun isn't shining. The company says the technology can lower the cost of solar power and make it more reliable, helping it compete with conventional sources of electricity. The company, based in Oakland, California, is building one of the world's largest solar thermal power plants. The 392-megawatt solar plant in Ivanpah, California, however, will not include the storage technology. Instead, Brightsource is working with utilities to determine which future projects could best benefit from storage.
Technology Review
August 9, 2011

An Office on Every Surface

How Microsoft's chief strategy officer views the future of our work spaces.
In a futuristic demo video that he showed in an internal sales meeting in 2009, Craig Mundie, Microsoft's chief research and strategy officer, imagined what work and life might look like a decade hence. The technologies showcased included massive touch screens connecting offices around the world, computer interfaces in tabletops, and mobile devices that receive data seamlessly. Since then, mobile devices have surged in popularity, and companies including Cisco are sketching future offices based on them. Major companies are also embracing cloud computing, with Microsoft itself recently releasing Office 365, an online version of its productivity software.
Technology Review
August 9, 2011

iPhone-Style Touch on a Giant Screen

New technology makes multitouch possible on a five-foot-wide screen only a few inches thick.
The touch-sensing technology used in gadgets like the iPhone and iPad could soon be seen in screens several meters across but only a few inches deep. Perceptive Pixel, based in New York, released a touch screen today with a diagonal dimension of 82 inches—just under seven feet—but only four inches thick. "All of the [tablet] and phone manufacturers have settled on projected capacitance as the best way to do multitouch, but it has been really difficult to scale up," says Jeff Han, founder of Perceptive Pixel and a research scientist at New York University. Projected capacitance involves sensing fingers when they distort the electric field around a transparent layer of electrodes across the surface of a screen. Scaling that up to much larger screens is challenging, because noise from the electronics in a display muddy the signal from a user's touches.
Technology Review
August 9, 2011

When Social Media Mining Gets It Wrong

Big problems could be ahead if we rely on conclusions drawn from individuals' social-networking data.
A complex picture of your personal life can now be pieced together using a variety of public data sources, and increasingly sophisticated data-mining techniques. But just how accurate is that picture? Last week in Las Vegas, at the computer security conference Black Hat, Alessandro Acquisti, an associate professor of information technology and public policy at the Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University, showed how a photograph of a person can be used to find his or her date of birth, social security number, and other information by using facial recognition technology to match the image to a profile on Facebook and other websites. Acquisti acknowledges the privacy implications of this work, but he warns that the biggest problem could be the inaccuracy of this and other data-mining techniques.
Technology Review
August 9, 2011

Choosing the Good Eggs

Activity inside fertilized eggs might offer clues to their reproductive success—a finding with possible implications for in-vitro fertilization.
By watching the tiny, pulsing motions of a newly fertilized mouse egg, researchers in a new study could determine which eggs stood the best chance of producing healthy mice. The same procedure should also work with human eggs, the researchers said yesterday, opening up the possibility of dramatically improving the success rates of in-vitro fertilization. In a paper in the current issue of Nature Communications, the researchers found that the insides of a newly fertilized egg slowly vibrate, and that the speed and direction of these movements was associated with the egg's likelihood of success.
MIT Research News
August 9, 2011

Portable, Super-High-Resolution 3-D Imaging

A simple new imaging system could help manufacturers inspect their products, forensics experts identify weapons and doctors identify cancers.
By combining a clever physical interface with computer-vision algorithms, researchers in MIT’s Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences have created a simple, portable imaging system that can achieve resolutions previously possible only with large and expensive lab equipment. The device could provide manufacturers with a way to inspect products too large to fit under a microscope and could also have applications in medicine, forensics and biometrics.

The heart of the system, dubbed GelSight, is a slab of transparent, synthetic rubber, one of whose sides is coated with a paint containing tiny flecks of metal. When pressed against the surface of an object, the paint-coated side of the slab deforms. Cameras mounted on the other side of the slab photograph the results, and computer-vision algorithms analyze the images.
Read Full Article at MIT News Office
Technology Review
August 8, 2011

Why Crisis Maps Can Be Risky When There's Political Unrest

Crisis maps in hostile political situations can let the dictatorial governments, as well as the protesters, see where the action is.
Crisis mapping has had a major impact in the last 18 months, helping to collate information and coordinate activities during the Haitian earthquake in early 2010 and the Japanese tsunami that struck earlier this year. But crisis mapping tools are increasingly springing up in politically fraught situations, too; most notably, they have been used to provide humanitarian relief during the protests that have swept through the Middle East in recent months. Since some authorities may want to undermine these efforts, or even attack those involved, it's becoming vital to protect these systems from interference, says George Chamales, a hacker and activist who has served as technical lead for crisis map deployments in Libya, Pakistan, and Sudan.