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May 24, 2016

BROWSE NEWS RESULTS

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Technology Review
February 23, 2010

TV on the Go

This TV receiver takes advantage of a new mobile TV standard, now beginning to roll out across the United States, that allows good reception of digital TV broadcasts even in a moving vehicle. Using Wi-Fi, the Tivit retransmits the video so it can be watched on a smart phone, netbook, or iPhone.
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

Plastic Paper

Aimed at business users, the Que e-reader uses a 266.7-millimeter display from E Ink, based on the same sort of technology used in the Kindle. But unlike other e-reader displays, which are controlled with silicon transistors on a glass backing, it uses organic transistors deposited on plastic. This makes for a lighter, tougher device.
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

Faster Portable Drive

With USB 3.0, the next generation of the popular USB standard for connecting peripherals, this portable hard drive can transfer data up to three times as fast as USB 2.0 drives can. The hard drive has 500 gigabytes of storage capacity and comes with an adapter card for laptops not equipped with built-in USB 3.0 ports. (The new ports are compatible with USB 2.0 devices and cables, but USB 2.0 cables cannot be used with USB 3.0 devices.)
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

Pocket Projector

The MPro150 is designed for those times when the screen of a laptop or iPhone just isn't big enough. The device uses liquid-crystal-on-silicon technology to display images projected with a super-bright LED. With a cable, it can show presentations and videos directly from laptops, iPods, and iPhones. It can also play files preloaded into either a memory card or the projector's one-gigabyte built-in memory.
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

Wireless Power

The Powermat Portable is intended for travelers who are tired of lugging around a collection of chargers for mobile devices. Place any device on the mat, and it uses induction to deliver a wireless charge; the power flows to small receivers that can be fitted to most handheld gadgets. The Powermat is powered by an AC adapter, but a built-in lithium-ion battery allows charging when you can't find a wall socket.
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

Hybrid Moped

The ET-120 is billed as the first commercial hybrid two-wheeled vehicle. Designed for the crowded streets and limited budgets of India, it won't be setting any speed records (it tops out at 65 kilometers per hour), but the price is right at less than $1,000. Electrical energy is stored in lead-acid batteries, and the bike gets 120 kilometers per liter of gas, compared with about 25 to 75 kilometers per liter for conventional mopeds.
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

Reinventing the Commercial Jet

The long-delayed boeing 787 is a lesson in the limits of outsourcing. It is also a preview of the future of air travel.
Nearly seven years ago, when I visited Boeing's cavernous manufacturing site in Everett, WA, the sight of machinists playing ping-pong in a vast but idle shop seemed to symbolize the stagnant state of the aviation industry. Air travel had not recovered from the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. And Boeing was facing stiff competition: Airbus, its European rival, had made innovative advances in commercial jets, such as rear tail pieces made from lightweight composites. Worse, Airbus was gearing up to build the A380 superjumbo jet--a higher-­capacity, more efficient competitor to ­Boeing's iconic 747. Boeing needed to do something bold. So it bet its business on a medium-sized advanced aircraft called the 7E7--today known as the 787 Dreamliner--that would be 20 percent more fuel-efficient than other jets of comparable size and cost less to maintain. Such a jet would make direct flights between far-flung smaller cities (say, Boston and Bangalore) cost-effective. "It's the future. It really is," Mark Jenks, a Boeing vice president who was then director of technology integration for the 7E7 program, said to me in 2003. "If we get it wrong, it's the end. And everyone here knows that."
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

A Rose by Another Name

A food critic explores the synthesis of the scents in modern fragrances.
For most of my adult life, I've been fragrance-­free. That's not because I don't like scents, perfumes, eaux de cologne, and the like. I do. But I outgrew the scents I used as a teenager--Eau Sauvage and, yes, Canoe. I stopped dousing myself. Or perhaps I moved my powers of appreciation to my palate. I'm a food writer, and I try to identify and remember everything I eat. Because I'm a food writer, I know how much industrial food depends on odorants, as molecules created for fragrance or flavors are called. And I'm interested in how the new "hypercuisine" or "molecular gastronomy" draws upon the technologies of industrial food to create new flavors: see the profile I wrote of Grant Achatz, the chef at Alinea in Chicago ("The Alchemist," January/February 2007). But the food and fragrance industries use odorants in very different ways.
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

What's Wrong with Venture Capital?

The old mechanism for funding the commercialization of new technologies is in trouble.
In the summer of 1996, Silicon Valley venture capitalists put a few million dollars into a telecom-equipment startup called Juniper Networks. Three years later, after a few more rounds of funding and the release of its first product, Juniper enjoyed an initial public offering of shares, or IPO. At the end of its first day of trading, it was worth nearly $5 billion, and within nine months, it was worth almost 10 times that. The original venture investors, meanwhile, were able to walk away with profits of better than 10,000 percent. Around the same time Juniper went public, Silicon Valley venture capitalists were putting money into a new networking startup, Procket Networks. This time, the initial investments were bigger, and over successive rounds of financing, Procket collected almost $300 million in venture money. Three years after it started, though, the company had still not launched a product, and in 2004 its assets were acquired by Cisco in a fire-sale deal. This time the VCs walked away with just a fraction of their original investments.
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

Technology Overview: Faster Tools to Scrutinize the Genome

The majority of genetic diagnostic testing is done with sequencing, which identifies each base, or "letter," in a string of DNA. Sequencing can be used to identify all of the roughly three billion base pairs in a human genome, but most clinical testing is limited to sequencing single genes, which can reveal the presence of a mutation that could result in a disease or other disorder. In research, scientists use newer techniques that can scan millions of strands of DNA in parallel--a faster, cheaper process that provides vast amounts of genetic data. But these advanced sequencing tests have yet to be approved or optimized for the practice of medicine. Most of the fast new sequencing technologies, developed by Illumina, Applied Biosystems, Complete Genomics, and others, use a camera to record fluorescently labeled bases as they bind to bits of a target sample of DNA. Watching a series of these reactions enables software to piece together the DNA sequence. Each company has developed novel ways to densely pack short strands of DNA onto a chip or slide, allowing millions of reactions to be recorded at once (see "Complete Genomics"). Most techniques require DNA molecules to be amplified, or copied many times before sequencing, but even newer methods such as those being developed by Pacific Biosciences and Oxford Nanopore can read the sequence of a single molecule, making it simpler to prepare samples and piece together the sequence.
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

Transforming Energy

How a government funding agency aims to solve the energy problem.
Radical innovation can alter the landscape of an entire industry. That's the goal of the newly formed Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy, part of the U.S. Department of Energy. Modeled after the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), ARPA-E was funded for the first time in last year's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to pursue transformational solutions to the energy problem. ARPA-E was originally proposed in a National Academies report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm. Energy Secretary Steven Chu--then director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory--was part of the committee that proposed to create a nimble, creative agency.
Technology Review
February 23, 2010

The Pace of Innovation Never Falters

Innovation and entrepreneurship are thriving.
Innovation is critical to economic growth and progress, and yet it seems so random. But if we step back, a pattern emerges. The pace of innovation is accelerating and is exogenous to the economy. At Draper Fisher Jurvetson, we see that pattern in the diversity and quality of the entrepreneurial ideas coming into our offices. Scientists do not think more slowly during recessions. Startup proposals seem better during downturns. For a model of the pace of innovation, consider Moore's Law--the annual doubling of computer power or data storage capacity. As Ray Kurzweil has plotted, these increased exponentially from 1890 (with punch-card computing) to 2010, across countless technologies and human dramas. Most recently, we have seen Moore's Law revolutionize the life sciences, from genomics to medical imaging, and work its magic in ever bigger and more diverse industries.