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Past Conferences

Conference Details - Speakers

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2008 MIT Robotics Conference

Robots: Informing Future Design for Human-Machine Interaction
December 2, 2008 - December 3, 2008
 
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Expertise Link
617-253-6257

Speaker URL

Harry Asada
Ford Foundation Professor of Engineering
Director, d’Arbeloff Laboratory for Information Systems and Technology
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Professor Asada received the S.B. (1973), S.M. (1975) and Ph.D. (1979) from Kyoto University and was a research scientist at Carnegie Mellon University before coming to MIT in 1982 as an assistant professor. He was promoted to associate professor in 1985, then spent three years at Kyoto University before returning to MIT, where he attained the rank of full professor in 1990. He is the author of three books, has received best-paper awards seven times, and holds nine patents. In 1998 he was awarded the ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineering) Dynamic Systems and Control Outstanding Investigator Award. The award is given to a Dynamic Systems and Control Division member "who has demonstrated sustained outstanding research contributions, either basic or applied, as a mechanical engineering professional to fields of interest to the DSCD."

Professor Asada is a specialist in robotics and control and he is director of the d'Arbeloff Laboratory for Information Systems and Technology, where he has created a Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium. He also heads his department's Information Engineering Systems Group and has been active in the Leaders for Manufacturing Program.

The research goal of the Intelligent Machines Laboratory is to explore a new machine design paradigm and methodology in the light of information and control technologies. Research efforts are focused on the extension of traditional control engineering to several cross-disciplinary areas. One is to integrate control design with mechanical design in speed robot arms and precision positioning systems. Another cross-disciplinary work focuses on human-centered control where human factors are incorporated into machine design and control. New control methods for consumer products and robots are being developed that will better serve human users and acquire knowledge and skills from humans for effective performance of intended tasks.

Professor Asada is part of the Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium (HAHC). This group is developing systems that collect information from individuals and the home environment through distributed miniaturized sensors, connected via wireless transmission. HAHC is also building a virtual human and a virtual home, both of which elucidate behavior based on the data collected from the individual and the environment; and simulates, diagnoses, controls and/or assists people in the home environment based on the models. Breakthrough technologies have been made in monitoring and device technologies, including ring sensors, conducting polymers, vestibular/ocular tests, nail sensors, and minimum energy RF transmission. (Sponsored by Asahi Chemical, Braun/Gillette, Daikin, Denso, GE/Marquette, Hill-Rom, MEI, MEW, NIRO, Shimadzu, Toshiba, and the U.S. Army. Investigators: H. Asada, 1. Hunter, S. Dubowsky, R. Kamm, K. Youcef-Toumi, L. Jones, and B.H. Yang.) Professor Asada is also working on the Model++ and Knowledge Networking Project, a research and educational program to develop a methodology for facilitating interdisciplinary studies. It provides modeling methodology for coupled nonlinear dynamics, co-simulation, and knowledge networking. (Sponsored by Daikin and NSF. Investigators: H. Asada and HAHC.) In addition to his research, Professor Asada teaches Advanced System Dynamics and Control; Robotics and Mechatronics; and Information, Computation and Control.
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Expertise Link
617-324-3085

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Edward Boyden
Benesse Career Development Assistant Professor of Research in Education
Head, Neuroengineering and Neuromedia Group
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellow
MIT Media Laboratory
Ed Boyden leads the Media Lab's Synthetic Neurobiology group, which is inventing and applying tools for the analysis and engineering of brain circuits, with the goal of developing new strategies for systematically repairing pathology, augmenting cognition, and revealing insights into the human condition. He is integrating nanotechnological, molecular, optical, and other technologies into interfaces for the precise control of neural circuit dynamics and function. Recently, he and his colleagues created a genetically targeted way to activate neurons with millisecond-timescale pulses of light, an innovation that has been widely adopted in neuroscience and neuroengineering, and resulted in his being named one of the "Top 35 Innovators Under the Age of 35" by Technology Review.

Boyden received his Ph.D. in neurosciences from Stanford University as a Hertz Fellow, where he discovered that the molecular mechanisms used to store a memory are determined by the content to be learned. He received an M.Eng. in electrical engineering, and B.S. degrees in physics and electrical engineering, all from MIT. These pursuits, as well as an independent career as an inventor, have earned him many invited talks, awards, papers, and pending patents.

Dr. Boyden became an Associate Member of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research in July 2007. In 2006, he joined the MIT Media Lab as a visiting scientist, where he is now an Assistant Professor (jointly with the Department of Biological Engineering).

In 2007, he received a Wallace H. Coulter Early Career Award to develop new approaches for treating epilepsy and Parkinson's disease.
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Expertise Link
617-452-5601

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Cynthia Breazeal
LG Career Development Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences
Head, Robotic Presence Group, MIT Media Laboratory
Cynthia Breazeal, who directs the Media Lab's Personal Robots group, came to the Lab in 2001 from MIT’s Artificial Intelligence (AI) Lab. As a doctoral student and then postdoctoral fellow at the AI Lab, Breazeal developed Kismet, an anthropomorphic robotic head that has been widely featured in international media and is the subject of her 2002 book Designing Sociable Robots. Breazeal’s research explores expressive social exchange between humans and humanoid robots. She is particularly interested in developing creature-like technologies that exhibit social common-sense and engage people in familiar, human terms.

Professor Breazeal continues to develop anthropomorphic robots as part of her ongoing work of building artificial systems that learn from and interact with people in an intelligent, life-like, and sociable manner. Nexi, a mobile, dexterous social robot developed by Breazeal’s research group, was named one of the 50 Best Innovations of 2008 by TIME magazine. Breazeal earned ScD and MS degrees at MIT in electrical engineering and computer science, and a BS in electrical and computer engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara.
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Expertise Link
617-253-5223

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Rodney Brooks
Panasonic Professor of Robotics, MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Co-Founder, iRobot Corporation
Chairman and CTO, Heartland Robotics
Rodney A. Brooks is the Panasonic Professor of Robotics at MIT. He is also co-founder of iRobot Corp (nasdaq: IRBT).
He has recently launched his own robotics firm, called Heartland Robotics, which will focus on industrial and workplace robots with the aim of boosting U.S. competitiveness.

From 1997-2003 and from 2003-2007 he was, respectively, Director of the Artificial Intelligence Lab and of the Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab. He received degrees in pure mathematics from the Flinders University of South Australia and the Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1981. He held research positions at Carnegie Mellon University and MIT, and a faculty position at Stanford before joining the faculty of MIT in 1984. His research is concerned with both the engineering of intelligent robots to operate in unstructured environments, and with understanding human intelligence through building humanoid robots. He has published papers and books in model-based computer vision, path planning, uncertainty analysis, robot assembly, active vision, autonomous robots, micro-robots, micro-actuators, planetary exploration, representation, artificial life, humanoid robots, and compiler design.

Dr. Brooks is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a Founding Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (AAAS), a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (the other AAAS), a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), a Foreign Fellow of The Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering (ATSE), and a Corresponding Member of the Australian Academy of Science (AAS). He won the Computers and Thought Award at the 1991 IJCAI (International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence). He has been the Cray lecturer at the University of Minnesota, the Mellon lecturer at Dartmouth College, and the Forsythe lecturer at Stanford University. He was co-founding editor of the International Journal of Computer Vision and is a member of the editorial boards of various journals including Adaptive Behavior, Artificial Life, Applied Artificial Intelligence, Autonomous Robots, the International Journal of Humanoid Research, and New Generation Computing. He starred as himself in the 1997 Errol Morris movie "Fast, Cheap and Out of Control"; named for one of his scientific papers, a Sony Classics picture, now available on DVD.


NOTE: Famed robotics expert Rodney Brooks is retiring from academic duties at MIT. The co-founder and former chief technical officer of Bedford, MA-based iRobot will be focusing full-time on his newest company, Heartland Robotics, based in Cambridge, MA. Brooks’s new role as professor emeritus at MIT will be effective July 1, 2010. He is 55.
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Expertise Link
617-253-0414

Neena Buck
Senior Industrial Liaison Officer
MIT Office of Corporate Relations/Industrial Liaison Program
Industry Overview
Day 1, 8:35 a.m.
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Expertise Link
617-253-2144

Speaker URL

Steven Dubowsky
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics and Astronautics
Director, Field and Space Robotics Laboratory (FSRL)
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Dr. Dubowsky is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. He teaches courses in control systems and in machine and mechanical system design. For six years Dr. Dubowsky was the Head of the Systems and Design Division of the Mechanical Engineering Department. He has also served as the Associate Head of the MIT Interdepartmental Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity.

Dr. Dubowsky is the Principal Investigator of a number of research programs sponsored by governmental agencies and industry in the area of the design and control of mechanical and electromechanical systems, including manufacturing machine systems and robotic manipulators. The overall goal of his research is to develop methods and models to aid industry in designing systems that are more productive, efficient, longer lasting, more reliable and safer. His work has included both analytical and experimental studies. He has lectured extensively on his research to universities and to industrial companies both in the United States and internationally.

Before joining the faculty at MIT, Dr. Dubowsky was a Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has also been a Visiting Professor in the Engineering Department and a Visiting Fellow of Queens' College of Cambridge University, Cambridge, England, Visiting Professor at the California Institute of Technology, Visiting Professor at the UniversitÈ de Paris (VI), France and at the United States Naval Postgraduate School. Before becoming an educator, Professor Dubowsky was employed in industry as an engineer responsible for the design and engineering evaluation of complex mechanical systems and devices, including fluid and hydraulic systems, high speed mechanical drive systems, control devices and complex mechanisms. During this period, from 1963 to 1971, he was employed by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation, the General Dynamics Corporation, and the American Electric Power Service Corporation.

Dr. Dubowsky received his undergraduate education at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, New York, graduating with a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering degree in 1963. He was awarded a Master of Science degree by the Mechanical Engineering Department, School of Engineering and Applied Science at Columbia, University in New York City. He later received his doctorate in Engineering Science from Columbia University.

Dr. Dubowsky has been elected a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, and U.S. Committee for the Theory of Machines and Mechanisms. He has been also elected to the Sigma Xi, the National Scientific Honorary Society, and Tau Beta Pi, the National Engineering Honorary Society. Dr. Dubowsky has been elected as a Distinguished NATO Fellow (Paris France) and an Honorary Senior Research Fellow by the United Kingdom Scientific and Engineering Research Council.

He has served as Chairman of the Mechanisms Technical Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and as a member of the ASME Design Division General Committee and its Executive Committee. He has also been an Associate Editor of the professional journal, Mechanisms and Machine Theory, as well as a technical reviewer for numerous professional and scholarly publications. Dr. Dubowsky founded the Journal of Mechanisms, Transmissions and Automation in Design, a Transaction of the ASME, and served as its Technical Editor for five years.

Dr. Dubowsky has published many technical articles in the area of mechanical and electromechanical systems design and analysis, and is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of California. He has also been an advisor to the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Science/Engineering, the Department of Energy, and the U.S. Army. He also serves as an engineering consultant to various industrial companies, governmental agencies and law firms.
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Expertise Link
617-253-1991

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Emilio Frazzoli
Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics
MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Is the Sky the Limit?
Track 1 - Land, Air and Sea Day 1, 2:25 p.m.
Emilio Frazzoli is an Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics with the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received a Laurea degree in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Rome, "Sapienza" , Italy, in 1994, and a Ph. D. degree in Navigation and Control Systems from the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in 2001. Between 1994 and 1997 he worked as an officer in the Italian Navy, and as a spacecraft dynamics specialist for the European Space Agency Operations Centre (ESOC) in Darmstadt, Germany, and Telespazio, in Rome, Italy. From 2001 to 2004 he was an Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. From 2004 to 2006 he was an Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is a Senior Member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He was the recipient of a NSF CAREER award in 2002.

Dr. Frazzoli’s research interests are focused mainly in the area of planning and control for mobile cyber-physical systems with an emphasis on autonomous vehicles, mobile robotics, and transportation networks.
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Dani Goldberg
Software Engineering Manager
BlueFin Robotics
Autonomy and Software Challenges for Underwater Vehicles
Track 1 - Land, Air and Sea Day 1, 3:05 p.m.
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Expertise Link
617-258-6574

Speaker URL

Hugh Herr
NEC Career Development Professor of Computer and Communications
Associate Professor in Media Arts and Sciences, and Health Sciences and Technology
Head, Biomechatronics Group
MIT Media Lab
Human 2.0
Day 2, 10:30 a.m.
Hugh Herr is Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences and Health Sciences and Technology. His primary research objective is to apply principles of muscle mechanics, neural control and human biomechanics to guide the designs of biomimetic robots, human rehabilitation devices, and augmentation technologies that amplify the endurance and strength of humans.

Professor Herr has advanced novel actuation strategies, including the use of animal-derived muscle to power robots in the millimeter to centimeter size scale. He has employed cross bridge models of skeletal muscle to the design and optimization of a new class of human-powered mechanisms that amplify endurance for cyclic anaerobic activities. He has also built elastic shoes that increase aerobic endurance in walking and running. In the field of human rehabilitation, Professor Herr’s group has developed gait adaptive knee prostheses for transfemoral amputees and variable impedance ankle-foot orthoses for patients suffering from drop foot, a gait pathology caused by stroke, cerebral palsy, and multiple sclerosis.

Professor Herr is the Founder and Chief Scientific Officer of iWalk which commercializes PowerFoot One, a robotic prosthetic ankle.
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Expertise Link
617-253-2277

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Neville Hogan
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Director, Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Contact Robotics for Neurological Rehabilitation
Track 2 - Application Opportunities Day 1, 3:05 p.m.
Neville Hogan is Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Director of the Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation at MIT. He is a co-founder of Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc., and a board member of Advanced Mechanical Technologies, Inc.

Born in Dublin, Ireland, he earned a Dip. Eng. (with distinction) from Dublin College of Technology and M.S., M.E. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT. Following industrial experience in engineering design, he joined MIT’s School of Engineering faculty in 1979 and has served as Head and Associate Head of the Mechanical Engineering department’s System Dynamics and Control division. Awards include an Honorary Doctorate from the Delft University of Technology; the Silver Medal of the Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland; and an Honorary Doctorate from the Dublin Institute of Technology.

Professor Hogan’s research is broad and multi-disciplinary, extending from biology to engineering—it has made significant contributions to motor neuroscience, rehabilitation engineering and robotics -- but its focus converges on an emerging class of machines designed to cooperate physically with humans. Recent work pioneered the creation of robots sufficiently gentle to provide physiotherapy to frail and elderly patients recovering from neurological injury such as stroke, a novel therapy that has already proven its clinical significance.
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Expertise Link
617-452-3262

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Karl Iagnemma
Principal Research Scientist
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
Self Supervised Sensing in Outdoor Environments
Track 3 - Technologies, Methods and Algorithms Day 1, 2:25 p.m.
Karl Iagnemma is a principal research scientist in the Mechanical Engineering department at MIT. He holds a B.S. from the University of Michigan, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from MIT, where he was a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow. He has performed postdoctoral research at MIT, and has been a visiting researcher at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the National Technical University of Athens (Greece). He currently serves on the editorial board of the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and the Journal of Field Robotics.

Dr. Iagnemma's primary research interests are in the areas of design, sensing, motion planning, and control of mobile robots in outdoor terrain, including modeling and analysis of robot-terrain interaction. He is author of the monograph Mobile Robots in Rough Terrain: Estimation, Planning and Control with Application to Planetary Rovers (Springer, 2004). He has recently led research programs for agencies including the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command, the Army Research Office, DARPA, the NASA Mars Program Office, Ford Motor Company, and the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts, among others. He has authored or co-authored many conference and journal papers on a wide range of robotic topics, and has consulted for various private companies and government agencies.

Dr. Iagnemma was chosen as one of 16 people who redefined science in 2003 by SEED magazine. He was a 2005 nominee for a MacArthur Foundation fellowship.
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Dan Kara
President
Robotics Trends
Industry Overview
Day 1, 8:35 a.m.
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Scott Kirsner
“Innovation Economy” Columnist
Sunday edition of Boston Globe
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Karl Koster
Executive Director
MIT Office of Corporate Relations/Industrial Liaison Program
Welcome and Introduction
Day 1, 8:30 a.m.
Opening Day 2
Day 2, 8:00 a.m.
Karl F. Koster is the Executive Director of the MIT Office of Corporate Relations. The Office of Corporate Relations at MIT includes the Industrial Liaison Program, which celebrated 60 years of service to the Institute and its corporate partners in 2008.

In that capacity, he and his staff work with the senior administrative and faculty leadership of MIT in developing and implementing strategies for enhancing corporate involvement with the Institute. Mr. Koster has been involved with faculty leaders in identifying and designing a number of major international programs for MIT. Many of these programs focus on institutional development and are characterized by the establishment of strong, international, programmatic linkages between universities, industry, and governments.

Mr. Koster graduated from Brown University with a B.A. in geology and economics in 1974, and received a M.S. from the MIT Sloan School of Management in 1980. At the Sloan School he concentrated in international business management and the management of technological innovation. Prior to returning to MIT, Mr. Koster worked as a management consultant for seven years in Europe, Latin America, and the United States on projects for private and public sector organizations.
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Expertise Link
617-253-5305

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John Leonard
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering
The MIT DARPA Urban Challenge Team
Track 1 - Land, Air and Sea Day 1, 1:45 p.m.
Simultaneous Localization and Mapping for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles
Track 3 - Technologies, Methods and Algorithms Day 1, 3:05 p.m.
John J. Leonard is Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering in the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering and is also a member of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). His research addresses the problems of autonomous navigation and mapping and mobile sensor networks. His teaching addresses the topics of robotics, acoustics, oceanography, computation, and design of ocean systems. He holds the degrees of B.S.E. in Electrical Engineering and Science from the University of Pennsylvania (1987) and D.Phil. in Engineering Science from the University of Oxford (1994). He has participated in numerous field deployments of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), including under-ice operations in the Arctic and several major experiments in the Mediterranean. His current projects include efforts for the Office of Naval Research to develop feature relative navigation algorithms for AUVs equipped with forward look sonar, techniques for distributed localization and control of ocean sampling networks, and methods for sensing and navigation of AUVs performing ship hull inspection.

Professor Leonard was appointed the director of the Ford-MIT Alliance in November 2009. MIT’s current alliance with Ford goes back 12 years. It relates to all aspects of Ford's research to support product development and processes.
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Expertise Link
617-258-9695

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Leslie Pack Kaelbling
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Learning and Probabilistic Reasoning
Track 3 - Technologies, Methods and Algorithms Day 1, 1:45 p.m.
Leslie Pack Kaelbling is Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Research Director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has previously held positions at Brown University, the Artificial Intelligence Center of SRI International, and at Teleos Research. She received an A. B. in Philosophy in 1983 and a Ph. D. in Computer Science in 1990, both from Stanford University. Prof. Kaelbling has done substantial research on designing situated agents, mobile robotics, reinforcement learning, and decision-theoretic planning. In 2000, she founded the Journal of Machine Learning Research, a high-quality journal that is both freely available electronically as well as published in archival form; she currently serves as editor-in-chief. Prof. Kaelbling is an NSF Presidential Faculty Fellow, a former member of the AAAI Executive Council, the 1997 recipient of the IJCAI Computers and Thought Award, a trustee of IJCAII and a fellow of the AAAI.
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Expertise Link
617-253-8988

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Joseph Paradiso
Sony Corporation Career Development Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences
Technology Director, Things That Think (TTT)
Head, Responsive Environments Group
MIT Media Laboratory
Joe Paradiso holds the Sony Career Development Professorship. He leads the Media Lab's Responsive Environments Group -- which explores the development and application of new sensor technologies for human-computer interfaces and intelligent spaces -- and is also co-director of the Things That Think Consortium.

Paradiso has developed a wide variety of systems that track human activity using electric field sensing, microwaves, ultra-low-cost laser ranging, passive and active sonar, piezoelectrics, and resonant electromagnetic tags. He has also developed several low-power, wireless embedded sensor suites for the Lab's wearable computing and tangible interface research, and directed human computer interaction (HCI) and sensor system engineering for many large, interactive, artistic projects, such as the Brain Opera.

Current research interests include embedded sensing systems and sensor networks, wearable and body sensor networks, energy harvesting and power management for embedded sensors, ubiquitous and pervasive computing, localization systems, passive and RFID sensor architectures, human-computer interfaces and interactive media.

As technology director for the Lab's Things That Think consortium, Paradiso identifies and pursues new areas of technical development for use in innovative devices and projects. A summa cum laude graduate of Tufts University with a B.S. in electrical engineering and physics, Paradiso received a Ph.D. in physics from MIT as a K.T. Compton Fellow working with Nobel laureate Samuel C.C. Ting at the Laboratory for Nuclear Science.

Before joining the Media Lab, he worked at ETH in Zurich, and the Draper Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where his research encompassed high-energy physics detectors, spacecraft control systems, and underwater sonar. He is the recipient of the 2000 Discover Magazine Award for Technological Innovation for his expressive footwear system, and his work has been shown at the Ars Electronica Center in Linz, Austria and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
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Expertise Link
617-253-0611

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Rosalind Picard
Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, Head, Affective Computing Group
Co-Director, Things That Think (TTT) Consortium, MIT Media Laboratory
Rosalind W. Picard is founder and director of the Affective Computing group at the MIT Media Laboratory and is co-director of the Things That Think consortium, the largest industrial sponsorship organization at the Media Lab. She holds a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering with highest honors from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and master's and doctorate degrees, both in electrical engineering and computer science, from MIT. She has been a member of the faculty at the MIT Media Laboratory since 1991, with tenure since 1998. Prior to completing her doctorate at MIT, she was a member of the technical staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories where she designed VLSI chips for digital signal processing, and developed new methods of image compression and analysis.

The author of over 140 peer-reviewed scientific articles in multidimensional signal modeling, computer vision, pattern recognition, machine learning, and human-computer interaction, Picard is known internationally for envisioning and conducting research in affective computing—computing that relates to, arises from, or deliberately influences emotion or other affective phenomena—and, prior to that, for pioneering research in content-based image and video retrieval. She is recipient (with Tom Minka) of a best paper prize for work on machine learning with multiple models (1998) and is recipient (with Barry Kort and Rob Reilly) of a "best theory paper" prize for their work on affect in human learning (2001). Her award-winning book, Affective Computing, (MIT Press, 1997) lays the groundwork for giving machines the skills of emotional intelligence. She and her students have designed and developed a variety of new sensors, algorithms, and systems for sensing, recognizing, and responding respectfully to human affective information, with applications in human and machine learning, health, and human-computer interaction. She is an IEEE Fellow.

Picard has served on many science and engineering program committees, editorial boards, and review panels, and is presently serving on the editorial board of User Modeling and User-Adapted Interaction: The Journal of Personalization Research, as well as on the advisory boards for the National Science Foundation's division of Computers in Science and Engineering (CISE) and for the Georgia Tech College of Computing.

Picard works closely with industry, and has consulted with companies such as Apple, AT&T, BT, HP, iRobot, and Motorola. She has delivered keynote presentations or invited plenary talks at over fifty science or technology events, and distinguished lectures and colloquia at dozens of universities and research labs internationally. Her group's work has been featured in national and international forums for the general public, such as The New York Times, The London Independent, Scientific American Frontiers, NPR's Tech Nation and The Connection, ABC's Nightline and World News Tonight with Peter Jennings, Time, Vogue, Voice of America Radio, New Scientist, and the BBC's The Works and The Big Byte.
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Expertise Link
617-253-2517

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Nicholas Roy
Boeing Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics
MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Micro Air Vehicle Flight in GPS-Denied Environments
Track 2 - Application Opportunities Day 1, 1:45 p.m.
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Expertise Link
617-258-7567

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Daniela Rus
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Associate Director (Artificial Intelligence); MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Daniela Rus is a professor in the Electrical Eengineering and Computer Science Department at MIT. She also co-directs the CSAIL Center for Robotics.

Previously, she was an assistant professor, associate professor, and professor in the Computer Science Department at Dartmouth. She holds a PhD is Computer Science from Cornell University. Her research interests include robotics, mobile computing, sensor networks, and information organization. She is a Class of 2002 MacArthur Fellow.
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Lewis Shepherd
Chief Technology Officer
Microsoft Institute for Advanced Technology in Governments
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Expertise Link
617-253-1778

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Russell Tedrake
Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Russ Tedrake is the X Consortium Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL). He is a recipient of the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award, the MIT Jerome Saltzer Award for undergraduate teaching, the DARPA Young Faculty Award, and was named a Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellow.
He received his B.S.E. in Computer Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1999, and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 2004, working with Sebastian Seung. After graduation, he spent a year with the MIT Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department as a Postdoctoral Associate. During his education, he has spent time at Microsoft, Microsoft Research, and the Santa Fe Institute.

Professor Tedrake's research group is interested in underactuated motor control systems in animals and machines that are capable of executing dynamically dexterous tasks and interacting with uncertain environments. They believe that the design of these control systems is intimately related to the mechanical designs of their machines, and that tools from machine learning and optimal control can be used to exploit this coupling when classical control techniques fail. Current projects include robust and efficient bipedal locomotion on flat terrain, multi-legged locomotion over extreme terrain, flapping-winged flight, and feedback control for fluid dynamics.
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Expertise Link
617-258-7885

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Seth Teller
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Seth Teller obtained a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley in 1992, focusing on accelerated rendering of complex architectural environments. After post-doctoral fellowships at the Computer Science Institute of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Institute of Computer Science, and Princeton University's Computer Science Department, Teller joined MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Lab for Computer Science, and Artificial Intelligence Lab in 1994. (In 2004, the two labs merged into CSAIL, MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.) At CSAIL, Teller heads the Robotics, Vision and Sensor Networks group, where his research focuses on enabling machines to become aware of their surroundings and interact naturally with people. Some of his lab's recent projects include: hand-held and body-worn devices that provide navigation assistance indoors; a voice-commandable robotic wheelchair; a self-driving LandRover; and an unmanned, outdoor forklift commanded through speech and gestures.
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