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Conference Details - Speakers

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2017 MIT Research and Development Conference

November 15-16, 2017
 
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Vic Abate
Chief Technology Officer & Senior Vice President
GE
Victor (Vic) Abate was named GE’s Chief Technology Officer and Senior Vice President in September 2015. Vic is responsible for one of the world's largest and most diversified industrial research and technology organizations.

Vic leads 50,000 engineers across GE and 2,000 scientists at GE Global Research. GE Global Research is where GE’s next breakthrough inventions are born, fueling the company's long-range technology needs. Research facilities are located in the United States, India, China, Germany and Brazil, working in collaboration with GE businesses around the world.

In his previous role, Vic served as the President & CEO of Gas Power Systems for GE Power, overseeing worldwide operations of GE’s heavy-duty gas turbine, steam turbine, generator and controls businesses. In this role, he led the development of GE’s HA gas turbine, which powers the world’s most efficient combined cycle power plant, located in France. The business has the largest delivered fleet of gas turbines in the world with more than 7,400 turbines operating in 112 countries and manufacturing in the Americas, Europe, and Asia.

From 2005 to 2013, Vic was President & CEO of GE’s Renewable Energy business, one of the world’s leading suppliers of renewable energy technology. In this role, Vic led the development and launch of GE’s 1.6-100 onshore wind turbine and GE’s 2.5-120 brilliant wind turbine, both of which were recognized as game changing products in the industry.

Vic began his GE career in 1990 and has held several management roles in engineering, services, production, and quality. In 1996, he led the large turbine generator business as the quality leader and was subsequently appointed general manager of generator technology. In 1999, Vic assumed responsibility for leading the gas turbine volume ramp up in GE’s Power Generation segment, and in late 2000 he was appointed general manager of steam turbine technology. In 2003, he became a GE company officer as the vice president of technology for power generation, which included technology for gas, steam, wind, solar, and hydro-turbine generators, gasification technologies, and integrated gasification combined cycle.

Prior to joining GE, Vic worked for Allied Signal and Zurn Industries and was responsible for mechanical drive technology and new product development.

Vic is a member of the Board of Directors of UI Labs and previously served as President of the Board of Directors of the American Wind Energy Association.

Originally from Williamstown, Massachusetts, he holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Union College, and an M.B.A. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He and his wife Karen have four children and reside in Saratoga Springs, New York.
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Expertise Link
617-452-2758

Speaker URL

Antoine Allanore
Thomas B King Assistant Professor of Metallurgy
MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Prof. Antoine Allanore has more than a decade of experience in the field of chemical metallurgy. Since 2004, as R&D engineer at ArcelorMittal in France, then at MIT since 2010, he has developed several alternative processes for metal extraction that adopt green chemistry principles. He co-founded Boston Electrometallurgical Corporation (BEMC) to engineer the large-scale development of such approaches. In 2012, he was appointed the T.B. King Assistant Professor of Metallurgy in the Department of Materials Science & Engineering at MIT, where his research group aims at developing sustainable materials extraction and manufacturing processes. His group has proposed a novel approach to investigate and control water/mineral interactions in soils using microfluidics (Word Congress on Soils Science, Korea, 2014, PLOSOne, 2015). Focusing on mining and processing of unconventional resources (Journal of the Total Environment, 2015, Green Chemistry 2015), he invented a waste-free process to produce a potassium fertilizer from earth-abundant raw materials. The product has been designed to suit tropical soils and has succeeded crop-tests. It is now under field evaluation in Brazil (16th World Fertilizer Congress, Rio, 2014). He teaches thermodynamics and sustainable chemical metallurgy at both the undergraduate and graduate level. He was awarded the DeNora Prize in 2012 and the Early Career Faculty Fellow award in 2015, both from TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society).
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Expertise Link
617-253-3301

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Polina Anikeeva
Class of 1942 Associate Professor in Materials Science and Engineering
MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Polina Anikeeva received her BS in Physics from St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University in 2003. After graduation she spent a year at Los Alamos National Lab where she worked on developing photovoltaic cells based on quantum dots. She then enrolled in a PhD program in Materials Science at MIT and graduated in January 2009 with her thesis dedicated to the design of light emitting devices based on organic materials and nanoparticles. She completed her postdoctoral training at Stanford University, where she created devices for optical stimulation and electrical recording from neural circuits. Polina joined the faculty of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT in July 2011, where she is now a Class of 1942 career development associate professor. Her lab focuses on the development of flexible and minimally invasive materials and devices for neural recording, stimulation and repair. Polina is also a recipient of NSF CAREER Award, DARPA Young Faculty Award, and the TR35 among others.
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Carlos Lima Azevedo
Research Scientist
TEC Executive Director
MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Dr. Carlos Lima Azevedo is a Research Scientist at the ITSLab and the Executive Director of the Transportation Education Committee since February 2014. Before joining MIT, he was a Senior PostDoctoral Associate at SMART (Singapore) and a research scholar at LNEC (Portugal). His main research interests are the mathematical modeling and simulation of human mobility, smart mobility services, the development and assessment of new technologies in transportation systems and the statistical and data analysis of safety. The integrated simulation of travel behaviour and system performance in the presence of new smart mobility solultions is one of his active field of research.
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Markus Buehler
Jerry McAfee (1940) Professor of Engineering
Department Head / Civil and Environmental Engineering
Director, Laboratory for Atomistic and Molecular Mechanics
MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Markus J. Buehler is the McAfee Professor of Engineering at MIT, and Head of Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. In his research, Buehler pursues new modeling, design and manufacturing approaches for advanced materials that offer greater resilience and a wide range of controllable properties from the nano to the macroscale. He has published several hundred scholarly articles on materials design and modeling, and authored several books. His most recent book “Biomateriomics” presents a new paradigm for the analysis of bio-inspired materials and structures to devise sustainable technologies, and using a mathematical categorization approach that connects insights from disparate fields such as materials, structures to music and language.

Buehler has received numerous awards and recognitions, including the MIT Harold E. Edgerton Faculty Achievement Award for exceptional distinction in teaching and in research or scholarship, the highest honor bestowed on young MIT faculty. Other major awards include the Alfred Noble Prize, the Leonardo da Vinci Award, the Thomas J. R. Hughes Young Investigator Award, and many other recognitions from professional societies. He is also recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award, the United States Air Force Young Investigator Award, the Navy Young Investigator Award, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award, as well as the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on outstanding scientists and engineers in the early stages of their careers. He was an invitee at several National Academy of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering Symposia and has delivered several plenary lectures at this forum. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the NANOSMAT Society. In 2016, he was awarded the Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology.
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Anantha Chandrakasan
Dean of Engineering
Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical Engineering
Department Head / Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS)
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Anantha P. Chandrakasan is dean of MIT’s School of Engineering, and the Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Read the News Office announcement (6/23/2017) of Chandrakasan's appointment to dean of the School of Engineering.

From July 2011 - July 2017, Chandrakasan was head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS). During his six-year tenure as head of MIT’s largest academic department, Chandrakasan spearheaded a number of initiatives that opened opportunities for students, postdocs, and faculty to conduct research, explore entrepreneurial projects, and engage with EECS.

Anantha P. Chandrakasan received the B.S, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1989, 1990, and 1994 respectively. Since September 1994, he has been with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, where he is currently the Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

Chandrakasan is a recipient of awards including the 2009 Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) University Researcher Award, the 2013 IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits, an honorary doctorate from KU Leuven in 2016, and the UC Berkeley EE Distinguished Alumni Award. He was also recognized as the author with the highest number of publications in the 60-year history of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC), the foremost global forum for presentation of advances in solid-state circuits and systems-on-a-chip. A fellow of IEEE, in 2015 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering.

Chandrakasan leads the MIT Energy-Efficient Circuits and Systems Group, whose research projects have addressed security hardware, energy harvesting, and wireless charging for the internet of things; energy-efficient circuits and systems for multimedia processing; and platforms for ultra-low-power biomedical electronics.

He is a co-author of Low Power Digital CMOS Design (Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995), Digital Integrated Circuits (Pearson Prentice-Hall, 2003, 2nd edition), and Sub-threshold Design for Ultra-Low Power Systems (Springer 2006).

Chandrakasan is an IEEE Fellow. He has served in various roles for the IEEE ISSCC including Program Chair, Signal Processing Sub-committee Chair, and Technology Directions Sub-committee Chair. He has been the Conference Chair of ISSCC since 2010. He was the Director of the MIT Microsystems Technology Laboratories from 2006 to 2011. From July 2011 through June 2017, he served as the the Head of the MIT EECS Department. He is currently the dean of MIT's School of Engineering.
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Expertise Link
617-253-6003

Speaker URL

David Clark
Senior Research Scientist
Co-Director, MIT Communications Futures Program (CFP)
MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
David Clark is a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, where he has worked since receiving his Ph.D. there in 1973. Since the mid 70s, Dr. Clark has been leading the development of the Internet; from 1981-1989 he acted as Chief Protocol Architect in this development and chaired the Internet Activities Board. His current research looks at re-definition of the architectural underpinnings of the Internet and the relation of technology and architecture to economic, societal and policy considerations. He is helping the U.S. National Science foundation organize their Future Internet Design program. Dr. Clark is past chairman of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies and has contributed to a number of studies on the societal and policy impact of computer communications. He is co-director of the MIT Communications Futures Program, a project for industry collaboration and coordination along the communications value chain.
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Dirk Englund
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Dirk Englund received his BS in Physics from Caltech in 2002. Following a Fulbright year at TU Eindhoven, he earned an MS in electrical engineering and a PhD in Applied Physics in 2008, both from Stanford University. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University until 2010, when he started his group as Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics at Columbia University. In 2013, he joined the faculty of MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Dirk's research focuses on quantum technologies based on semiconductor and optical systems. Recent recognitions include the 2011 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the 2011 Sloan Research Fellowship in Physics, the 2012 DARPA Young Faculty Award, the 2012 IBM Faculty Award, an 2016 R&D100 Award, the OSA's 2017 Adolph Lomb Medal , and the 2017 ACS Photonics Young Investigator Award.
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Kevin Esvelt
NEC Career Development Assistant Professor of Computer and Communications
MIT Media Lab
Kevin Esvelt is director of the Sculpting Evolution group, which invents new ways to study and influence the evolution of ecosystems. By carefully developing and testing these methods with openness and humility, the group seeks to address difficult ecological problems for the benefit of humanity and the natural world.

Prior to joining the MIT Media Lab, Esvelt wove many different areas of science into novel approaches to ecological engineering. He invented phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE), a synthetic microbial ecosystem for rapidly evolving biomolecules, in the laboratory of David R. Liu at Harvard University. At the Wyss Institute, he worked with George Church to develop the CRISPR system for genome engineering and regulation, and he began exploring the use of bacteriophages and conjugation to engineer microbial ecosystems.

Esvelt is credited as the first to describe how CRISPR gene drives could be used to alter the traits of wild populations in an evolutionarily stable manner. And recently, he and his Sculpting Evolution group devised a new form of technology, called ‘daisy drives’, which would let communities aiming to prevent disease alter wild organisms in local ecosystems.

By emphasizing universal safeguards and early transparency, he has worked to ensure that community discussions always precede and guide the development of technologies that will impact the shared environment.
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Expertise Link
617-253-5266

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John Fernández
Professor of Architecture, Building Technology and Engineering Systems
Head, Building Technology (Architecture)
Director, MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative
Director, Urban Metabolism Group
Director, Emergent Materials Group
Co-Director, International Design Center (Singapore University of Technology and Design)
MIT Department of Architecture
John E. Fernández ‘85 is a professor of building technology in the Department of Architecture and a practicing architect. Fernández founded and directs the MIT Urban Metabolism Group, a highly multidisciplinary research group focused on the resource intensity of cities and design and technology pathways for future urbanization. He is author of two books, numerous articles in scientific and design journals including Science, the Journal of Industrial Ecology, Building and Environment, Energy Policy and others, and author of nine book chapters. He is Chair of Sustainable Urban Systems for the International Society of Industrial Ecology and Associate Editor of the journal Sustainable Cities and Society. Fernández served as Director of the Building Technology Program in the Department of Architecture from 2010 to 2015 and as the Director of the International Design Center at MIT from 2012 to 2015. He previously served as the Director of Research for Sustainable Energy Systems of the MIT Portugal Program.

Fernández is a member of the Board for New Ecology, Inc., and a member of the Board of Advisors for the Center for Sustainable Energy of the Fraunhofer Institute. At MIT, Fernández serves on the Committee on the Innovation Initiative, the Faculty Policy Committee, and the Institute Planning Committee, as well as the Campus Sustainability Task Force, the MIT Materials and Waste Management Working Group, and the Metropolitan Warehouse Advisory Group. Fernández is Housemaster for MIT’s Baker House.

Fernández has served on several National Science Foundation Review Panels, as a member of the Department of Energy Roadmap 2020 Advisory Committee, and as a member of the Board of Directors of the Building Envelope Technology and Environmental Council of the National Institute of Building Science. He also served as a member of the Research Committee of the United States Green Building Council. Fernández has participated in the launch of two startup companies in the past 5 years. With his partner and wife, Malvina Lampietti, Fernández has been designer of more than 2.5 million square feet of new construction. As senior designer in two major New York City architecture firms Fernández led the design and construction of major commercial, institutional, and residential buildings in Washington D.C., New York City, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Honolulu, Jakarta, Tokyo, Shanghai, and other locations.
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Charles Fine
Chrysler Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management
Professor of Operations Management and Engineering Systems
President and Dean of Asia School of Business, in collaboration with MIT Sloan School
Co-Director, International Motor Vehicle Program
MIT Sloan School of Management
Charles Fine is the Chrysler Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management, a Professor of Operations Management and Engineering Systems, and the Co-Director of the International Motor Vehicle Program at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

His research focuses on supply chain strategy and value chain roadmapping, with a particular focus on fast-clockspeed manufacturing industries. Fine’s work has supported design and improvement of supply chain relationships for companies in electronics, automotive, aerospace, communications, and consumer products. His current research examines outsourcing dynamics, with a focus on dynamic models for assessing the leverage among the various components in complex industrial value chains and the principles for value chain design, based on strategic and logistical assessments.

At MIT Sloan, he teaches Operations Strategy and Supply Chain Management and directs the roadmapping activities in the Communications Futures Program. Fine teaches and consults widely with such clients as 3M, Accenture, Agile Software, Alcan, BellSouth, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bombardier, Caterpillar, Chrysler, Delphi Automotive, Deutsche Bank Alex Brown, Embraer, Fluor, GE, GM, Goodyear, HP, Honeywell, Intel, Kodak, Lucent, Mercury Computer, Merrill Lynch, Motorola, NCR, Nokia, Nortel, Oracle, Polaroid, PTC, Research-in-Motion, Rolls-Royce, Sematech, Teradyne, Toyota, TRW, Unilever, Volkswagen, Volvo, and Walsin Lihwa. He also serves on the board of directors for Greenfuel Technologies Corporation, a biotechnology company that he co-founded, which focuses on renewable energy. Fine also serves as co-director of an executive education program, Driving Strategic Innovation, which is a joint venture between MIT Sloan and IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland.

He is the author of Clockspeed: Winning Industry Control in the Age of Temporary Advantage (Perseus Books, 1998). His work on quality management, flexible manufacturing, supply chain management, and operations strategy has appeared in a variety of publications, including Management Science, Operations Research, Journal of Manufacturing and Operations Management, Production and Operations Management, Annals of Operations Research, Games and Economic Behavior, Sloan Management Review, Supply Chain Management Review, and Interfaces.

Fine holds an AB in mathematics and management science from Duke University as well as an MS in operations research and a PhD in business administration from Stanford University.
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Expertise Link
617-324-5027

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Niels Holten-Andersen
Henry L Doherty Assistant Professor in Ocean Utilization
MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Niels Holten-Andersen, an Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, joined the MIT faculty in September 2012. He holds the B.Sc. in Biology from the University of Copenhagen, the B.Sc.Hon. in Molecular Biology from the University of Canterbury, the M.Sc. in Cell Biology from the University of Copenhagen, and the Ph.D. in Biomolecular Science and Engineering from the University of California-Santa Barbara. He was previously a post-doc at the University of Chicago; his work on cross-linking, self-healing soft matter, and bio-inspired materials will help to move the department in bold new directions.

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Jason Jay
Senior Lecturer, Sustainability
Director, Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan
MIT Sloan School of Management
Jason Jay is a Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan. His research focuses on how people navigate the tensions between personal, business, and social goals in sustainability efforts. His first book is Breaking Through Gridlock: The Power of Conversation in a Polarized World and he has published articles in the Academy of Management Journal and California Management Review. He teaches courses on strategy, innovation, and leadership for sustainable business at MIT, and engages students and alumni in hands-on projects with leading companies and organizations. Prior to MIT, Jason was a management consultant for Dialogos International, where he consulted on leadership development and organizational change for major international corporations and NGO's including BP and the World Bank. Jason holds a Ph.D. in Organization Studies from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and an AB and M.Ed from Harvard University. He lives in Newton, Massachusetts.
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Expertise Link
617-290-9618

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Simon Johnson
Ronald A Kurtz (1954) Professor of Entrepreneurship
Professor of Global Economics and Management
MIT Sloan School of Management
Simon Johnson is the Ronald A. Kurtz (1954) Professor of Entrepreneurship at the MIT Sloan School of Management, where he is also head of the Global Economics and Management group and chair of the Sloan Fellows MBA Program Committee. He cofounded and currently leads the popular Global Entrepreneurship Lab (GLAB) course – over the past 16 years, MBA students in GLAB have worked on more than 500 projects with start-up companies around the world.

He also works closely with Joi Ito, head of MIT’s Media Lab, on the Digital Currency Initiative (DCI). Specifically, Johnson supervises research projects related to blockchain technology, and teaches a course (with Michael Casey and Brian Forde) on this fast developing business sector. Johnson is not an investor in bitcoin or any bitcoin-related startups, but he works closely with MIT students and others who want to build better companies.

Johnson is a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, D.C., a cofounder of BaselineScenario.com, and a member since inception of the FDIC’s Systemic Resolution Advisory Committee. In July 2014, Johnson joined the Financial Research Advisory Committee of the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Financial Research (OFR); he chairs the recently formed Global Vulnerabilities Working Group.

Johnson has been a member of the private sector Systemic Risk Council since it was founded by Sheila Bair in 2012; this group is now chaired by Sir Paul Tucker. From April 2009 to April 2015, he was a member of the Congressional Budget Office's Panel of Economic Advisers. In March 2016, Johnson was the third Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the Central Bank of Barbados.

“For his articulate and outspoken support for public policies to end too-big-to-fail”, Johnson was named a Main Street Hero by the Independent Community Bankers of America (ICBA) in 2013. In April 2015, the Washington Examiner placed Johnson at #11 on their list of New Voices for 2015. In November 2015, Johnson joined the advisory council of Intelligence2 Debates.

Over the past seven years, Johnson has published more than 300 high impact pieces in the New York Times, Bloomberg, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, The New Republic, BusinessWeek, The Huffington Post, The Financial Times, and Project Syndicate.

“The Quiet Coup” received over a million views when it appeared in The Atlantic in early 2009. His book 13 Bankers: the Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown (with James Kwak), was an immediate bestseller and has become one of the mostly highly regarded books on the financial crisis. Their follow-up book on U.S. fiscal policy, White House Burning: The Founding Fathers, Our National Debt, and Why It Matters for You, won praise across the political spectrum. Johnson’s academic research on economic development, corporate finance, and political economy is widely cited.

From March 2007 through the end of August 2008, Johnson was the International Monetary Fund's Economic Counsellor (chief economist) and Director of its Research Department. He also helped to found and run the NBER Africa Project; four volumes are forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press.

Johnson holds a B.A. in economics and politics from the University of Oxford, an M.A. in economics from the University of Manchester, and a Ph.D. in economics from MIT.

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Valerie Karplus
Class of 1943 Career Development Assistant Professor of Global Economics and Management
MIT Sloan School of Management
Valerie J. Karplus is the Class of 1943 Career Development Professor and an Assistant Professor of Global Economics and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Karplus studies resource and environmental management in firms operating in diverse national and industry contexts, with a focus on the role of institutions and management practices in explaining performance. Karplus is an expert on China’s energy system, including technology and business model innovation, energy system governance, and the management of air pollution and climate change. She works with a collaborative team of researchers to study the micro and macro determinants of clean energy transitions in emerging markets, with a focus on China and India. She teaches Entrepreneurship without Borders, New Models for Global Business, and is currently developing a new course, together with Professor Chris Warshaw in Political Science, on Global Energy Markets and Policy.

She has previously worked in the development policy section of the German Federal Foreign Office in Berlin, Germany, as a Robert Bosch Foundation Fellow, and in the biotechnology industry in Beijing, China, as a Luce Scholar. From 2011 to 2015, she directed the MIT-Tsinghua China Energy and Climate Project, a five-year research effort focused on analyzing the design of energy and climate change policy in China, and its domestic and global impacts. She is a faculty affiliate of the MIT Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research, the MIT Energy Initiative, and the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change.

Karplus holds a BS in biochemistry and political science from Yale University and a PhD in engineering systems from MIT.

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David Sun Kong
Director, Community Biotechnology Initiative
MIT Media Lab
David Sun Kong is a Synthetic Biologist, community organizer, musician, and photographer based in Lexington, MA. He is the Director of the MIT Media Lab's new Community Biotechnology Initiative. Our mission: empowering communities through biotechnology.

David is a pioneer in developing "lab-on-a-chip" technologies for synthetic biology and a leader in the global community biology movement. He conducted his graduate studies at MIT’s Media Lab, receiving a Master's degree for developing technology for printing nanostructures with energetic beams and a Ph.D. for demonstrating the first gene synthesis in a microfluidic (“lab-on-a-chip”) system. He was recognized as an emerging leader in synthetic biology as a "LEAP" fellow, served as a guest faculty member at the Marine Biology Lab in Woods Hole, MA, and is co-founder and managing faculty of "How To Grow (Almost) Anything, an international course on synthetic biology. He founded and chaired new Microfluidic and Hardware Tracks for the International Genetically Engineered Machines Competition (iGEM) and is the official iGEM DJ. He was Technical Staff in the Bioengineering Systems & Technologies group at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory and a founding member of the synthetic biology team. He is also the founder of Metafluidics, an open repository for fluidic systems.

He has also worked as a community organizer for more than a decade and is the founder and director of EMW, an art, technology, and community space in Cambridge, MA. EMW's mission is to empower communities through the transformative power of artistic expression. We emphasize serving marginalized communities and develop all of our programming with values rooted in social justice. Our community programs explore expressive forms ranging from poetry to electronic music, beatboxing to bio-hacking and more.

David has performed as a DJ, beat-boxer, vocalist, and rapper at hundreds of venues, including South by Southwest, the Staples Center in Los Angeles, and Brooklyn Bowl, where he opened for Tonight Show band-leader and hip hop legend Questlove. He is also an award-winning vocal arranger and producer. His photography has been exhibited at the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian, the Japanese American National Museum, and other museums and galleries across the country.
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Expertise Link
617-253-0439

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Karl F. Koster
Executive Director
MIT Corporate Relations
Welcome and Introduction
Day 1, 8:30 - 8:40
Karl F. Koster is the Executive Director of the MIT Corporate Relations. The MIT Corporate Relations includes the MIT Industrial Liaison Program, which celebrated 69 years of service to the Institute and its corporate partners in 2017, and MIT Startup Exchange.

In that capacity, Mr. Koster and his staff work with the leadership of MIT and senior corporate executives to design and implement strategies for fostering corporate partnerships with the Institute. Mr. Koster and his team have also worked to identify and design a number of major international programs for MIT, which have been characterized by the establishment of strong, programmatic linkages among universities, industry, and governments. Most recently these efforts have been extended to engage the surrounding innovation eco-system, including its vibrant startup and small company community, into MIT's global corporate and university networks.

Mr. Koster also serves as the Chairman of the University-Industry Demonstration Partnership (UIDP), an organization that seeks to enhance the value of collaborative partnerships between universities and corporations.

Mr. Koster graduated from Brown University with a B.A. in geology and economics in 1974, and received a M.S. from the MIT Sloan School of Management in 1980. At the Sloan School he concentrated in international business management and the management of technological innovation. Prior to returning to MIT, Mr. Koster worked as a management consultant in Europe, Latin America, and the United States on projects for private and public sector organizations.
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Expertise Link
617-253-8799

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Kent Larson
Principal Research Scientist
Director, Changing Places
MIT Media Laboratory
Kent Larson directs the Changing Places research group and the City Science Initiative at the MIT Media Laboratory. His recent work has focused on four areas:

Responsive Housing. Strategies to create high-performance, technology-enabled personalized, places of living that respond to an aging population and new ways of living and working. In this approach, buildings are disentangled into four independently configured layers: high performance chassis, integrated infill, agile technology, and responsive façade modules. These concepts are being deployed in the CityHome: a compact, transformable apartment for urban dwellers that functions as if a much larger space.

Urban Mobility-on-Demand. Concepts for shared-use light electric vehicles and intelligent fleet management to provide high-levels of service through sensor networks, dynamic incentives, and intelligent charging. The group worked with automotive suppliers in Spain to develop a commercial version of the MIT CityCar called Hiriko: a folding two-passenger vehicle with robot wheels and drive-by-wire control for urban mobility and highly efficient parking.

Living Labs. Computational tools to understand human behavior in natural environments, including the necessary sensing, interfaces, data collection methods, and visualization capabilities. They have developed prototypical applications that respond to human behavior, with an emphasis on proactive health, energy conservation, and the support of new ways of living and working. This work includes the exploration of data collection and analysis tools to understand the fine-grained attributes of a healthy, high-functioning community or city, and strategies to use this information to inform the design of new communities.

City Science. Design and technology-driven solutions that address the challenges of current and future cities. The City Science Initiative’s research spans a variety of fields including urban mobility and vehicle design, modular and transformable housing, resilient energy networks, and urban design.

Larson practiced architecture for 15 years in New York City, with work published in Architectural Record, Progressive Architecture, Global Architecture, the New York Times, A+U, and Architectural Digest. His book, Louis I. Kahn: Unbuilt Masterworks was selected as one of the Ten Best Books in Architecture, 2000 by the New York Times Review of Books. Related work was selected by Time magazine as a "Best Design of the Year" project.
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Benedetto Marelli
Paul M Cook Career Development Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Benedetto Marelli joined the faculty as an assistant professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering in November 2015. He received a B.Eng. and an M.Sc. in biomedical engineering from Politecnico di Milano and pursued his doctoral studies in materials science and engineering at McGill University. His dissertation focused on the biomineralization of tissue-equivalent collagenous constructs and their use as rapidly-implantable osteogenic materials. As a postdoctoral scholar at Tufts University, Marelli worked on the self-assembly and polymorphism of structural proteins, particularly silk fibroin. Marelli?s research at MIT will be in the area of structural biopolymers, biomineralization and self-assembly, mechanical and optoelectronic properties of natural polymers, biocomposites, additive manufacturing, and emerging technologies. By combining basic material principles with advanced fabrication techniques and additive manufacturing, he has developed new strategies to drive the self-assembly of structural biopolymers in advanced materials with unconventional forms and functions such as inkjet prints of silk fibroin that change in color in the presence of bacteria or flexible keratin-made photonic crystals. Using biofabrication strategies, his group will design bio-inspired materials that act at the biotic/abiotic interface to reduce or mitigate environmental impact.
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Expertise Link
617-324-8432

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Wojciech Matusik
Esther and Harold E Edgerton Career Development Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Computational Manufacturing
Day 2, 10:00 - 10:45

Wojciech Matusik is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT, where he leads the Computational Fabrication Group. Before coming to MIT, he worked at Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, Adobe Systems, and Disney Research Zurich. He studied computer graphics at MIT and received his PhD in 2003. He also received a BS in EECS from the University of California at Berkeley in 1997 and MS in EECS from MIT in 2001. His research interests are in direct digital manufacturing and computer graphics. In 2004, he was named one of the world's top 100 young innovators by MIT's Technology Review Magazine. In 2009, he received the Significant New Researcher Award from ACM Siggraph. In 2012, Matusik received the DARPA Young Faculty Award and he was named a Sloan Research Fellow.
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Jurgen Michel
Senior Research Scientist, Materials Research Laboratory
Senior Lecturer, MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Jurgen Michel leads research projects in silicon-based photonic materials and devices as well as advanced solar cell designs. His main focus is currently on on-chip WDM devices, Ge-based high performance detectors and modulators, and Ge-based lasers with the goal to implement active photonics devices in CMOS based chips.

Prior to joining MIT in 1991 he was Postdoctoral Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories, studying defect reactions and defect properties in semiconductor materials. He was educated in Germany and earned his diploma in Physics at the University of Cologne and his doctorate and habilitation in Applied Physics at the University of Paderborn. He has published more than 200 refereed scientific papers, 4 book chapters, 19 awarded patents, and more than 20 pending patents.
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Ernest Moniz
Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems Emeritus
Former U.S. Secretary of Energy
Special Advisor to the MIT President
Ernest J. Moniz served as the thirteenth United States Secretary of Energy from 2013 to January 2017. As Secretary, he advanced energy technology innovation, nuclear security and strategic stability, cutting-edge capabilities for the American scientific research community, and environmental stewardship. He strengthened the Department of Energy (DOE) strategic partnership with its seventeen national laboratories and with the Department of Defense and the broader national security establishment. Specific accomplishments included producing analytically-based energy policy proposals that attracted bipartisan support and implementing legislation, leading an international initiative that placed energy science and technology innovation at the center of the global response to climate change, and negotiating alongside the Secretary of State the historic Iran nuclear agreement. He reorganized a number of DOE program elements, elevated sound project and risk management, and strengthened enterprise-wide management to improve mission outcomes.

Dr. Moniz served on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty from 1973 until becoming Secretary of Energy in 2013 and is now the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems emeritus and Special Advisor to the MIT President. He has been named co-chairman of the Board of Directors and CEO of the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a non-profit organization that has advanced innovative solutions for securing nuclear materials, building international cooperation for nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation, preventing the spread of disease and reducing radiological threats. He is the inaugural Distinguished Fellow of the Emerson Collective and CEO of the non-profit Energy Futures Initiative.

Dr. Moniz previously served in government as DOE Under Secretary from 1997 until January 2001 with science, energy and nuclear security responsibilities and from 1995 to 1997 as Associate Director for Science in the Office of Science and Technology Policy with responsibility for the physical, life and social sciences. He was a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and of the Defense Threat Reduction Advisory Committee from 2009 to 2013. He also served on the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future that provided advice to the President and the Secretary of Energy, particularly on nuclear waste management.

At MIT, Dr. Moniz was the Founding Director of the MIT Energy Initiative (MITEI) and Director of the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment. MITEI grew to involve over a quarter of the faculty across the entire Institute, launched new educational programs for energy, and established novel models for industry-faculty engagement that simultaneously provided individualized company research portfolios with a common approach that lifted the entire energy enterprise. Dr. Moniz is a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Harvard Belfer Center.

Dr. Moniz was also Head of the MIT Department of Physics during 1991-1995 and 1997 and Director of the Bates Linear Accelerator Center from 1983-1991. His physics research centered on developing the theoretical framework for understanding intermediate energy electron and meson interactions with atomic nuclei. Since 2001, his primary research focus has been energy technology and policy, including a leadership role in MIT multidisciplinary technology and policy studies addressing pathways to a low-carbon world (Future of Nuclear Power, of Coal, of Natural Gas and of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle). These studies had significant impact on energy policy and programs.

Dr. Moniz received a Bachelor of Science degree summa cum laude in physics from Boston College, a doctorate in theoretical physics from Stanford University, and nine honorary doctorates1, including three from European universities. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and of the International Advisory Board of the Atlantic Council and received the 1998 Seymour Cray HPCC Industry Recognition Award for vision and leadership in advancing scientific simulation. Among other awards, he is the recipient of the Distinguished Public Service Medals of the Department of Defense and of the Navy. He also was awarded the Grand Cross of the Order of Makarios III (Cyprus) and of the Order of Prince Henry the Navigator (Portugal). Other awards include the Charles Percy Award of the Alliance to Save Energy, the Right Stuff Award of the Blue-Green Alliance Foundation, the Franklin D. Roosevelt Distinguished Public Service Award, and the Neustadt Award of the Harvard Kennedy School for creating exceptional solutions to significant problems in public policy. He is a Fellow of the American Physics Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Humboldt Foundation, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Moniz served on the Board of Directors of both publicly traded and private companies in the energy and security sectors. He also served on the Boards of several non-profit energy industry organizations and as a high-level advisor to several energy-related companies and investment firms.

Dr. Moniz is a resident of Brookline Massachusetts with his wife Naomi, their daughter Katya, and grandchildren Alex and Eve. He is a very modestly accomplished but very enthusiastic practitioner of fly-fishing.
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Elsa Olivetti
Thomas Lord Career Development Assistant Professor in Materials Science Engineering
MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Elsa Olivetti began her position as a Thomas Lord Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering in January 2014. She completed her Ph.D. at MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and since then has been working in MIT's Materials Systems Lab, currently holding the position of Research Scientist. She holds a Bachelor of Science with Highest Distinction in Engineering Science and Materials Science from the University of Virginia. Olivetti’s research focuses on characterizing and understanding sustainable materials systems, examining the economic and environmental implications of all aspects of the materials cycle, from selection, to manufacturing, to recycling or disposal decisions. She works with several research teams, including a consortium working on environmental assessment of electronic products and MIT's Concrete Sustainability Hub. At MIT, Olivetti has taught subjects for the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, the Sloan School, and the MIT-Portugal Program.
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Andrew Plump
Chief Medical and Scientific Officer, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company
In 2015, Andrew Plump, M.D., Ph.D., joined Takeda as Chief Medical and Scientific Officer (CMSO). Dr. Plump also serves as a member of Takeda’s Executive Team and of the company’s Board of Directors. In his position, he leads Takeda’s global Research & Development organization, where he provides strategic direction and oversight.

Dr. Plump brings an unwavering focus on patients and a deep commitment to innovation and positive change in the healthcare industry. To continue and accelerate Takeda’s R&D successes, he leads an organization that focuses on people and partnerships, modality diversification, and translational medicine and genomics.

Prior to Takeda, Dr. Plump served as Senior Vice President, Research & Translational Medicine, Deputy to the President of R&D at Sanofi, where he was responsible for global research and translational medicine across all therapeutic areas.

Dr. Plump also spent more than 10 years at Merck in a Clinical Pharmacology group, working on programs in neurodegeneration, immunology, metabolism and infectious diseases. Following additional roles focusing on early development, genomics and biomarkers, particularly in cardiovascular and metabolism, he assumed the position of Vice President, Worldwide Cardiovascular (CV) Research Head. In this role, he had direct responsibility for preclinical development and research teams, and a leadership role in the end-to-end activities of the Merck cardiovascular portfolio. Together with his team, he helped discover and support a pipeline of novel therapies in atherosclerosis, vascular diseases and thrombosis.

Dr. Plump received his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), his doctorate in cardiovascular genetics with Dr. Jan Breslow from the Rockefeller University, and his bachelor’s degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the U.S. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Medical Genetics at UCSF. Following his clinical training, Dr. Plump continued his scientific training in neuroscience as a Howard Hughes and Stanley J. Sarnoff postdoctoral fellow, with Dr. Marc Tessier-Lavigne, concurrently assuming faculty responsibilities as an Adjunct Clinical Instructor in the Department of Medical Genetics.
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Jennifer Rupp
Thomas Lord Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Jennifer Rupp is the Thomas Lord Assistant Professor of Electrochemical Materials in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT. Before she came to MIT, Prof. Rupp was a non-tenure-track assistant professor at ETH Zurich Switzerland where she held two prestigious, externally-funded career grants: an ERC Starting Grant (SNSF) and a Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) professorship from 2012 on.

She previously was a visiting and senior scientist at MIT (2011-2012) and at the National Institute of Materials Science (NIMS) in Tsukuba Japan (2011), and worked as a postdoc at ETH Zurich (2006-2010). Professor Rupp team's current research interests are on solid-state material design and tuning of structure-property relations for novel energy and information devices and operation schemes. This ranges from alternative energy storage via batteries or catalytic convertor systems processed by smart material design for solar light and CO2 to renewable synthetic fuels, or novel types of neuromorphic memories and computing logic entities for data storage and transfer beyond transistors. Her team at MIT works on material design, creating novel processing techniques, and making ceramics, cermets, and glass-type ceramic structures. Her team also works on device prototypes, specifically their operation and characteristics.

She has published more than 70 papers, holds 4 patents, and enjoys actively discussing material tech trends on the theme of energy with the public, economists and policy makers. She is a frequent speaker and member of the World Economic Forum (2015-2017), and contirbutes to CNN and other television programs.

Professor Rupp and her team received several honors and awards such as the keynote lecture at the Nature Energy Conference 2016, "Top 40 international scientist under the age of 40" by World Economic Forum in 2015, Spark Award for the most innovative and economically important invention of the year at ETH Zurich, and Gordon Research lecture in 2014, the Kepler award for “new materials in energy technology” by the European Academy of Science in 2012, and the Young Scientist Award by the Solid State Ionic Society.
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617-258-7567

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Daniela Rus
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Director, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)
Co-Director, CSAIL Center for Robotics
MacArthur Fellow
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Daniela Rus is the Andrew (1956) and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) at MIT. Rus’ research interests are in robotics, artificial intelligence, and data science.

The focus of her work is developing the science and engineering of autonomy, toward the long-term objective of enabling a future with machines pervasively integrated into the fabric of life, supporting people with physical tasks. Her research addresses some of the gaps between where robots are today and the promise of pervasive robots: increasing the ability of machines to reason, learn, and adapt to complex tasks in human-centered environments, developing intuitive interfaces between robots and people, and creating the tools for designing and fabricating new robots quickly and efficiently. The applications of this work are broad and include transportation, manufacturing, agriculture, construction, monitoring the environment, underwater exploration, smart cities, medicine, and in-home tasks such as cooking.

Rus serves as the Director of the Toyota-CSAIL Joint Research Center, whose focus is the advancement of AI research and its applications to intelligent vehicles. She is a member of the Toyota Research Institute advisory board.

Rus is a Class of 2002 MacArthur Fellow, a fellow of ACM, AAAI and IEEE, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is the recipient of the 2017 Engelberger Robotics Award from the Robotics Industries Association. She earned her PhD in Computer Science from Cornell University.
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Robie Samanta Roy
Vice President of Technology Strategy and Innovation, Lockheed Martin
Robie I. Samanta Roy is vice president of Technology Strategy and Innovation at Lockheed Martin. Dr. Samanta Roy’s primary responsibilities include: 1) developing and providing technical intelligence and strategy for the corporation; 2) engaging the global S&T ecosystem outside the corporation – including government labs, universities, large and small businesses, and startups; and 3) fostering cross-enterprise innovation within the corporation. In this role, he works with leaders from across the Corporation to develop and actively manage enterprise technology roadmaps aligned with customer and business area needs. Dr. Samanta Roy also serves as a liaison with government and non-government organizations critical to the formation of S&T policy and the execution of research.

Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Dr. Samanta Roy was a professional staff member with the Senate Armed Services Committee from 2010 to 2014 with the portfolio of the Department of Defense’s wide spectrum of science and technology-related activities. He came to that position from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy where he was the assistant director for Space and Aeronautics from 2005 to 2009 and was responsible for space and aeronautics activities ranging from human space flight to the Next Generation Air Transportation System. Dr. Samanta Roy previously served as a Strategic Analyst at the Congressional Budget Office and as a Research Staff Member in the Systems Evaluation Division of the Institute for Defense Analyses in Alexandria, Virginia.

Dr. Samanta Roy earned his Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT. He earned a master’s degree in space policy from George Washington University and diplomas from the International Space University and Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris.

Dr. Samanta Roy is an Associate Fellow and member of the Board of Trustees of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a member of the National Research Council’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. He also chairs the Industry Relations Committee of the International Astronautical Federation and serves on the Board of Visitors for the University of Maryland’s College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences and on the FAA’s Drone Advisory Committee. Dr. Samanta Roy continues to serve in the U.S. Air Force Reserve.
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Sara Seager
Class of 1941 Professor of Physics and Planetary Science
MIT Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences
Sara Seager received her B.Sc. in mathematics and physics from the University of Toronto in 1994. She earned a Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University in 1999, where she investigated recombination in the early Universe before moving to the then brand-new field of exoplanets. Seager was a long-term member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, and a senior research staff member at the Carnegie Institution of Washington in Washington, D.C., before joining the MIT faculty in 2007. Seager was awarded the American Astronomical Society’s Helen B. Warner prize in 2007 for her work on exoplanet atmospheres.

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Max Shulaker
Emanuel E Landsman (1958) Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Prof. Max Shulaker began as Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 2016, where he leads the Novels (Novel Electronic Systems Group) at MIT. Previously to joining MIT, he was at Stanford University where he received his B.S., Masters, and PhD in Electrical Engineering. Prof. Shulaker’s research interests include the broad area of nanosystems. His research group focuses on understanding and optimizing multidisciplinary interactions across the entire computing stack – from low-level synthesis of nanomaterials, to fabrication processes and circuit design for emerging nanotechnologies, up to new architectures – to enable the next generation of high performance and energy-efficient computing systems. His research results include the demonstration of the first carbon nanotube computer(highlighted on the cover of Nature and presented as a Research Highlight to the US Congress by the US NSF), the first digital sub-systems built entirely using carbon nanotube transistors (awarded the ISSCC Jack Raper Award for Outstanding Technology Directions Paper), the first monolithically-integrated 3D integrated circuits combining arbitrary vertical stacking of logic and memory, the highest performance carbon nanotube transistors to-date, and the first highly-scaled carbon nanotube transistors fabricated in a VLSI-compatible manner.
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Venkat Sumantran
Chairman, Celeris Technologies
Venkat Sumantran is Chairman of Celeris Technologies, with more than thirty years of experience heading organizations in the auto industry in the United States, Europe, and Asia.
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Timothy Swager
John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry
MIT Department of Chemistry
Timothy M. Swager is the John D. MacArthur Professor of Chemistry the Department of Chemistry at MIT and the Faculty Director of the Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation. In this latter role, Professor Swager works with the Center’s Executive Director to define the Center’s strategy for fostering innovation, assists with the commercialization of MIT technologies, and plays a key role in the grant selection process. Professor Swager also serves as the Center’s liaison to the MIT academic community, and senior leadership, sitting on faculty and academic committees. Following Professor Swager’s postdoctoral appointment at MIT, he joined the chemistry faculty at the University of Pennsylvania, returning to MIT in 1996 as a Professor of Chemistry, and served as the Head of Chemistry from 2005-2010. Professor Swager’s research interests are in design, synthesis, and study of organic-based electronic, sensory, high-strength and liquid crystalline materials. He has published more than 400 peer-reviewed papers and more than 80 issued/pending patents. Professor Swager is the founder of four companies (DyNuPol, Iptyx, PolyJoule, and C2Sense) and has served on a number of corporate and government boards.He received a B.S. from Montana State University in 1983 and a Ph.D., from the California Institute of Technology in 1988.
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Carl V. Thompson
Stavros Salapatas Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
Director, Materials Processing Center, MIT
Professor Thompson received his S.B. in Materials Science and Engineering from MIT in l976. He received his S.M. and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics from Harvard University in 1977 and 1982 respectively. He was an IBM postdoctoral fellow in the Research Laboratory of Electronics at MIT in l982 and joined the faculty of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering in l983. He received an IBM faculty development award in l983 and was appointed the Mitsui career development assistant professor of contemporary technology in l984 and l985. In 1987 he was appointed associate professor of electronic materials, and became a full professor in 1992. He was named the Director of the Materials Processing Center (MPC) on August 1, 2008.

Professor Thompson spent the 1990-91 academic year at the University of Cambridge Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, where he was awarded a United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council Visiting Fellowship. He spent the 1997-98 academic year at the Max-Plank Institute fur Metallforschung in Stuttgart and received a research award for Senior U.S. Scientist from the Alexander Von Humboldt Foundation. Professor Thompson's research is carried out in affiliation with the MIT Microsystem's Technology Laboratory and the MIT Materials Processing Center, as well as the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. Prof. Thompson Co-Chairs the program in Advanced Materials for Micro and Nano-Systems in The Singapore-MIT Alliance.

Professor Thompson has served on the Materials Research Society (MRS) Council, was the second Vice-President in 1994, the first Vice-President in 1995, and the President in 1996. He currently chairs the Program Development Subcommittee of the MRS Program Committee. He has organized a number of MRS symposia and co-chaired the Spring 1991 MRS meeting.

Professor Thompson worked briefly for U.S. Steel and General Electric and has been a consultant for a number of microelectronics companies, new companies exploiting nanotechnology, and legal firms. Professor Thompson has also taught short courses at a number of companies, including Hewlett-Packard, Chartered Semiconductor, and Digital Equipment Corporation.
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617-253-8983

Trond Undheim
Lead, Startup Exchange
MIT Industrial Liaison Program
Trond heads up the Startup Initiative at MIT’s Industrial Liaison Program (ILP), facilitating productive relationships between industry and MIT’s startup ecosystem. He is a former Senior Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Trond is a serial entrepreneur with Scandinavian roots, and is currently the Founder of Yegii, Inc., the insight network, and Managing Director of Tautec Consulting.

Trond is a leading expert on technology development across industries such as IT, Energy, and Healthcare. His knowledge spans entrepreneurship, strategy frameworks, policy making, action learning, virtual teamwork, knowledge management, standardization, and e-government. He wrote the book Leadership From Below (2008). Trond speaks six languages and is a frequent public speaker on business, technology, and wine.

Trond was a Strategy/business development executive at Oracle Corp. (2008-12), and a policy maker in the EU (2004-8) where he built the ePractice.eu web platform with 120,000 members. He has worked with multinational companies, with mid-caps and startups in Brazil, China, Colombia, France, Indonesia, Norway, the UK, and the US. He has a PhD in Multidisciplinary Technology Studies from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
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Vinod Vaikuntanathan
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Blind Machine Learning
Day 1, 4:00 - 4:45
Vinod Vaikuntanathan is the Steven and Renee Finn Career Development Associate Professor in the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) at MIT.

Vaikuntanathan studies cryptography, a topic of ever-increasing importance in modern society. He has made breakthroughs that bring us much closer to being able to compute on encrypted data, important for secure cloud computing, as well as in functional cryptography, the ability to share only some parts of an encrypted system. He has won numerous awards, including a Sloan Research Fellowship, a National Science Foundation CAREER award, and a Microsoft Faculty Fellowship. He is a gifted teacher, and he has a strong record of service within his research community.
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315-436-5928

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Kalyan Veeramachaneni
Principal Research Scientist
MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems
Dr. Veeramachaneni is a Principal Research Scientist in Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems at MIT. He currently leads multiple large scale, multi institutions projects on data science, big data and machine learning. He received his Ph.D in Electrical engineering and Computer Science from Syracuse University. His focus during his Ph.D. was in distributed machine learning over sensor networks.

Dr. Veeramachaneni has also provided consulting to industry and lead a number of industrial research projects that include automotive companies, software and service companies. From 2010-2013 he lead and designed a large scale machine learning platform for General Electric called FlexGP. The platform currently also open source is used for solving many large scale machine learning problems.

Dr. Veeramachaneni has three patents pending, two of which have led to his students starting companies called DataSight and Cardinal Wind. These companies utilize machine learning to solve real world problems. He is currently a founding advisor to a security company called PatternEx that is building a large scale AI platform for identifying early precursors to a digital attack.
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Daniel Weitzner
Principal Research Scientist
MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory
Daniel Weitzner is the Director of the MIT CSAIL Decentralized Information Group and teaches Internet public policy in MIT’s Computer Science Department. His research includes development of accountable systems architectures to enable the Web to be more responsive to policy requirements.

From 20011-2012, Weitzner was the United States Deputy Chief Technology Officer for Internet Policy in the White House. He led initiatives on privacy, cybersecurity, Internet copyright, and trade policies promoting the free flow of information,. He was responsible for the Obama Administration’s Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights and the OECD Internet Policymaking Principles.

Weitzner has been a leader in the development of Internet public policy from its inception, making fundamental contributions to the successful fight for strong online free expression protection in the United States Supreme Court, and for laws that control government surveillance of email and web browsing data.

Weitzner is a founder of the Center for Democracy and Technology, led the World Wide Wed Consortium’s public policy activities, and was Deputy Policy Director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. In 2012 he was named to the Newsweek/Daily Beast Digital Power Index as a top ‘Navigator’ of global Internet public policy and in 2013 he received the International Association of Privacy Professional’s Leadership Award.
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Scott Willoughby
Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Vice President & James Webb Space Telescope Program Manager
Scott P. Willoughby is the Northrop Grumman vice president and program manager for NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. Willoughby has more than 27 years of experience in the aerospace industry. He received a bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, in electrical engineering from Lehigh University in 1989 and a master’s degree in communication systems from the University of Southern California in 1991. He is also a graduate of the UCLA Executive Program at the Anderson School of Management.
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James Womack
Founder and Senior Advisor, Lean Enterprise Institute
Management expert James P. Womack, Ph.D., is the founder and senior advisor to the Lean Enterprise Institute, Inc., a nonprofit training, publishing, conference, and management research company chartered in August 1997 to advance a set of ideas known as lean production and lean thinking, based initially on Toyota’s business system and now being extended to an entire lean management system.

The intellectual basis for the Cambridge, MA-based Institute is described in a series of books and articles co-authored by Womack and Daniel Jones over the past 20 years. The most widely known books are: The Machine That Changed the World (Macmillan/Rawson Associates, 1990), Lean Thinking (Simon & Schuster, 1996), Lean Solutions (Simon & Schuster, 2005), and Seeing The Whole Value Stream (Lean Enterprise Institute, 2011). Articles include: "From Lean Production to the Lean Enterprise" (Harvard Business Review, March-April, 1994), "Beyond Toyota: How to Root Out Waste and Pursue Perfection" (Harvard Business Review, September-October, 1996), “Lean Consumption” (Harvard Business Review, March-April, 2005).

Womack received a B.A. in political science from the University of Chicago in 1970, a master's degree in transportation systems from Harvard in 1975, and a Ph.D. in political science from MIT in 1982 (for a dissertation on comparative industrial policy in the U.S., Germany, and Japan). During the period 1975-1991, he was a full-time research scientist at MIT directing a series of comparative studies of world manufacturing practices. As research director of MIT’s International Motor Vehicle Program, Womack led the research team that coined the term “lean production” to describe Toyota’s business system.

Womack served as the Institute's chairman and CEO from 1997 until 2010 when he was succeeded by John Shook.
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