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Conference Details - Agenda

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2017 MIT Research and Development Conference

November 15-16, 2017
 

Day 2: Thursday, November 16, 2017

8:00 - 8:30

Kresge Auditorium
(Building W16)

Registration and Light Breakfast

8:35 - 9:05

How we are educating the next generation of innovators at MIT, and how industry can participate

9:05 - 9:35

Industry Keynote: Accelerating Takeda’s R&D Successes

9:35 - 10:00

Networking Break

10:00 - 10:45

Faster, Smarter, Greener: The Future of the Car and Urban Mobility
To support societal demands for mobility fluidity, co-existing with a sustainable planet, mobility systems for a digitally powered society must be efficient and innovation friendly. Efficiency requires intelligent use of assets and aggressive use of best technology, while consumers expect freedom in personal choices as well as fairness. Future society will demand Connected, Heterogeneous, Intelligent, and Personalized (CHIP) mobility. We propose a framework where Heterogeneous transportation modes are Connected both digitally and physically, and Intelligent apps can access data on usage, congestion, prices, and weather, for example, and enable real time and Personalized travel planning throughout a city, whether a traveler wants to optimize time, cost, carbon footprint or touristic aesthetics. This framework proposes that urban planners create policies to support such a vision and that the traditional auto industry is likely to enjoy a less dominant role in architecting mobility frameworks. Governments and city administrations will be joined by traditional auto industry players as well as a range of new-generation entrepreneurs and investors, technology startups, and app developers, all of which have contributions to make in redefining future mobility.
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10:45 - 11:30

How autonomous driving will change mobility

11:30 - 11:45

Networking Break

11:45 - 12:30

City of the future: how changes to physical and digital infrastructure will effect and be effected by mobility

12:30 - 1:15

Panel Discussion: Policies, economics, business models and technologies for mobility of the future
Moderator: Venkat Sumantran
Panelists: Jim Womack, Valerie Karplus, Carlos Lima Azevedo

10:00 - 10:45

Computational Manufacturing

10:45 - 11:30

Bio-inspired metal-coordination crosslinking: easy access to broad dynamics for new engineering of polymer mechanics

11:30 - 11:45

Networking Break

11:45 - 12:30

Structural biopolymers – using Nature’s building blocks as an inspiration for advanced manufacturing
Structural biopolymers are materials engineered by Nature as building blocks of living matter. These materials have unique and compelling properties that allow for their assembly and degradation with minimal energy requirements as well as their performance at the biotic/abiotic interface. By combining basic material principles with advanced fabrication techniques, it is possible to define new strategies to drive the assembly of structural biopolymers in advanced materials with unconventional forms and functions such as edible coating for perishable food, inkjet prints of silk fibroin that change in color in the presence of bacteria, three dimensional monoliths that can be heated by exposure to infrared light and flexible keratin-made photonic crystals.
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12:30 - 1:15

Build AI products faster, cheaper
Artificial intelligence is being embedded into products to save people time and money. Experts in many domains have already begun to see the results of this, from medicine to education to navigation. But these products are built using an army of data scientists and machine learning experts, and the rate at which these human experts can deliver results is far lower than the current demand. My lab at MIT, called Data to AI, wanted to change this. Recognizing the human bottleneck in creating these systems, a few years ago we launched an ambitious project: we decided “to teach a computer how to be a data scientist." Our goal was to create automated systems that can ask questions of data, come up with analytic queries that could answer those questions, and use machine learning to solve them—in other words, all the things that human data scientists do. After much research and experimentation, the systems we have developed now allow us to build end-to-end AI products that can solve a new problem in one day. In this talk, I will cover what these new technologies are, how we are using them to accelerate the design and development of AI products, and how you can take advantage of them to actually build AI products faster and cheaper.
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10:00 - 10:45

Harnessing high temperature materials for extraction and processing
The demand for materials, particularly minerals and metals, has experienced an exceptional growth in the last decades. In parallel, the costs of the corresponding processing technologies have reached levels that are unsustainable for most countries. Increasing access to cost effective and clean electricity sets the stage for novel processes that can match new expectations from society. In this context, recent research and development results pertinent to materials processing are presented, in particular for oxides and sulfides. In parallel, novel experimental methods and predictive capacity for high temperature systems are shown, paving the way to transformative processes and materials.
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10:45 - 11:30

Engineering Ceramic and Glass-Materials for Energy Storage, Sensing and Computing
The next generation of energy storage, sensors and neuromorphic computer logics in electronics rely largely on solving fundamental questions of mass and charge transport of ionic carriers and defects in materials and their structures. Here, understanding the defect kinetics in the solid state material building blocks and their interfaces with respect to lattice, charge carrier types and interfacial strains are the prerequisite to design novel energy storage, sensing and computing functions. Through this presentation basic theory and model experiments for solid state oxides their impedances and memristance, electro-chemo-mechanics and lattice strain modulations is being discussed as a new route for engineering material and properties on the examples of solid state batteries, environmental CO2 sensors and memristors for memory and neuromorphic computing chips. Central are the making of new oxide film materials components, and manipulation of the charge carrier transfer and defect chemistry (based on ionic and electronic carriers), which alter directly the device performances and new operation metrics.
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11:30 - 11:45

Networking Break

11:45 - 12:30

Germanium: Low Cost, High Performance Solar Cells and Photonics Devices
Device performance is in most cases connected to the materials quality. In many cases, high quality materials are available, but at a cost that is commercially not viable. We have been working on improving the quality of germanium for use as a virtual substrate for III-V semiconductor materials and for active silicon-based photonic devices. Germanium as a virtual substrate would enable low cost, high efficiency solar cells as will be presented in one example. An example for advanced germanium based devices are single photon detectors, operating at room temperature in the near infrared.
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12:30 - 1:15

Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials for Probing and Interrogation of Neural Function
Mammalian nervous system contains billions of neurons that exchange a diversity of signals. Our ability to study this complexity is limited by the lack of technologies available for interfacing with neural circuits without inducing a foreign-body reaction. My talk will describe strategies pursued in my group to mimic the materials properties and signaling modalities of the nervous system. I will discuss how fiber-based fabrication methods can be applied to polymers, metals and composites to deliver flexible and stretchable optoelectronic probes for multifunctional interfaces with the brain and spinal cord circuits. These fiber based probes enable simultaneous electrophysiological recording and optical modulation of neural activity as well as local delivery of drugs and genetic constructs into the nervous system of freely moving subjects. In addition, I will describe how synergistic action of magnetic nanomaterials and alternating or slow-varying magnetic fields can be applied to deliver thermal and mechanical stimuli for minimally invasive control of neural activity.

1:15

Adjournment with Bagged Lunch

* All schedule and speakers are subject to change without notice.