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Conference Details - Agenda

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2017 MIT Research and Development Conference

November 15-16, 2017
 

Day 1: Wednesday, November 15, 2017

7:30 - 8:30

Kresge Auditorium
(Building W16)

Registration and Light Breakfast

8:30 - 8:40

Welcome and Introduction

8:40 - 9:15

Industry Keynote: Industrial Innovation … Where Research Meets Reality

9:15 - 9:45

Academic Keynote: Challenges and Future Scenarios in Energy Policy and Technology, Related R&D, and Innovation Investments

9:45 - 10:00

MIT Presentations: Sloan Executive Education, MISTI

10:00 - 10:40

Networking Break

10:40 - 11:20

Industry Keynote: Technology Strategy and Innovation at Lockheed Martin

11:20 - 12:00

MIT Startup Exchange: Introduction and Lightning Talks

MIT Startup Exchange actively promotes collaboration and partnerships between MIT-connected startups and industry. Qualified startups are those founded and/or led by MIT faculty, staff, or alumni, or are based on MIT-licensed technology. Industry participants are principally members of MIT’s Industrial Liaison Program (ILP).

MIT Startup Exchange maintains a propriety database of over 1,500 MIT-connected startups with roots across MIT departments, labs and centers; it hosts a robust schedule of startup workshops and showcases, and facilitates networking and introductions between startups and corporate executives.

STEX25 is a startup accelerator within MIT Startup Exchange, featuring 25 “industry ready” startups that have proven to be exceptional with early use cases, clients, demos, or partnerships, and are poised for significant growth. STEX25 startups receive promotion, travel, and advisory support, and are prioritized for meetings with ILP’s 230 member companies.

MIT Startup Exchange and ILP are integrated programs of MIT Corporate Relations.


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12:00 - 12:05

MIT Presentation: MECHE

12:05 - 2:00

Walker Memorial
(Building 50)

Lunch and Startup Exhibit
2017 Startup Exhibitors
Catherine Havasi, CEO & Co-Founder, Luminoso
Jose Chan, VP Business Development, Celect
Matt Carey, Director Business Development, Humatics
Glynnis Kearney, VP Product & Strategy, Gamalon
Matt Osman, CEO & Co-Founder, Legit Patents
Duncan McCallum, CEO, Digital Alloys
Alexander Shkolnik, CEO & Co-Founder, Liquid Piston
Brian Spatocco, CTO, Advanced Potash
Vinayak Ranade, CEO, Drafted
Francisco Aguilar, CEO, Bounce Imaging
Abdul Mohsen "A.Z." Husseini, CTO, Analytical Space
Will Tashman, Co-Founder, Uncountable
Andy Vidan, CEO, Composable Analytics
Tuan Le Mau, Co-Founder, Advent Tech Lab

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Track 1: The Latest Development of Nanotechnology

2:00 - 2:45

Transforming Nanotechnologies into Applications
While trillions of sensors that will soon connected to the “Internet of Everything” (IoE) promise to transform our lives, they simultaneously pose major obstacles, which we are already encountering today. The massive amount of generated raw data (i.e., the “data deluge”) is quickly exceeding computing capabilities, and cannot be overcome by isolated improvements in sensors, transistors, memories, or architectures alone. Rather, an end-to-end approach is needed, whereby the unique benefits of new emerging nanotechnologies – for sensors, memories, and transistors – are exploited to realize new system architectures that are not possible with today’s technologies. However, emerging nanomaterials and nanodevices suffer from significant imperfections and variations. Thus, realizing working circuits, let alone transformative nanosystems, has been infeasible. In this talk, I present a path towards realizing these future systems in the near-term, and show how based on the progress of several emerging nanotechnologies (carbon nanotubes for logic, non-volatile memories for data storage, and new materials for sensing), we can begin realizing these systems today. As a case-study, I will discuss how by leveraging emerging nanotechnologies, we have realized the first monolithically-integrated three-dimensional (3D) nanosystem architectures with vertically-integrated layers of logic, memory, and sensing circuits. With dense and fine-grained connectivity between millions of on-chip sensors, data storage, and embedded computation, such nanosystems can capture terabytes of data from the outside world every second, and produce “processed information” by performing in-situ classification of the sensor data using on-chip accelerators. As a demonstration, we tailor a demo system for gas classification, for real-time health monitoring from breath.
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2:45 - 3:30

Chemistry of the Graphene Surface for the Creation of Functional Nanomaterials
The utility of carbon nanomaterials is highly dependent upon the precision upon which they can be assembled and functionalized. New methods enable high impact applications in sensing, mechanical, membrane, and energy storage/conversion. Approaches to the formation of functional assemblies of carbon nanotubes will be described that involved the non-covalent immobilization of the materials into functional assemblies. In a non-covalent method, no direct chemical bonds are made to the carbon nanotubes, thereby leaving their electronic properties intact. New covalent connections to the graphene surfaces (sidewalls) of the carbon nanotubes will also be discussed and how these materials can serve to modify their electronic properties for devices as well as hard wire functional assemblies to the carbon nanotubes to provide interactions with chemicals (sensors) or electrocatalysis (energy conversion). Many of these methods are also applicable to the functionalization of graphite to create new forms of graphene. We will also show how high purity graphene can be produced in using new scalable electrochemical methods.
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3:30 - 4:00

Networking Break

4:00 - 4:45

Making nano big – hierarchical design and manufacturing
What if we could design materials that integrate powerful concepts of living organisms – self-organization, the ability to self-heal, tunability, and an amazing flexibility to create astounding material properties from abundant and inexpensive raw materials? This talk will present a review of bottom-up analysis and design of materials for various purposes – as structural materials such as bone in our body or for lightweight composites, for applications as coatings, and as multifunctional sensors to measure small changes in humidity, temperature or stress. These new materials are designed from the bottom up and through a close coupling of experiment and powerful computation as we assemble structures, atom by atom. Materiomics investigates the material properties of natural and synthetic materials by examining fundamental links between processes, structures and properties at multiple scales, from nano to macro, by using systematic experimental, theoretical or computational methods. We review case studies of joint experimental-computational work that demonstrate the scale-up of nanotechnology, via biomimetic materials design, manufacturing and testing for the development of strong, tough and smart mutable materials for applications as protective coatings, cables and structural materials. We outline challenges and opportunities for technological innovation for biomaterials and beyond, exploiting novel concepts of mathematics based on category theory, which leads to a new way to organize hierarchical structure-property information. Altogether, the use of a new paradigm to design materials from the bottom up plays a critical role in advanced manufacturing, providing flexibility, tailorability and efficiency.
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4:45 - 5:30

Semiconductor quantum technologies for communications and computing
The Internet is among the most significant inventions of the 20th Century. We are now poised for the development of a quantum internet to exchange quantum information and distribute entanglement among quantum computers that could be great distances apart. This kind of quantum internet would have a range of applications that aren’t possible in a classical world, including long-distance unconditionally-secure communication, precision sensing and navigation, and distributed quantum computing. But we still need to develop or perfect many types of components and protocols to build such a quantum internet. This talk will consider some of these components, including quantum memories based on atomic defects in semiconductors, circuits for manipulating single electronic and nuclear spins, efficient spin-photon interfaces, and photonic integrated circuits. The talk will also provide an overview of quantum communications protocols that are now running in a Boston-area quantum network.
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Track 2: Internet Policy Research Initiative

2:00 - 2:45

Data Ownership Impact on Privacy and Security

2:45 - 3:30

Internet Governance and Culture
Hardly a week goes by without a report about another cyberattack. With almost every major organization having been victim, including most government organizations, such as Equifax, Target, Sony, NSA, and the US Office of Personnel Management, you might ask: "Why are these problems not being fixed? Who is in charge here?" The answer is that nobody is in charge, and that is the secret of the Intenet's success. The governance structure of the Internet is bottom-up, not top-down. However, certain sorts of problems are hard to solve in a bottom-up governance regime. In this session we will discuss the history of Internet governance, different points of view about the future of Internet governance, and how different aspects of cyber-security depend on different actors for their solution. We will use a case study of a current security challenge to illustrate how problems get solved in a fluid space of governance organizations.
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3:30 - 4:00

Networking Break

4:00 - 4:45

Blind Machine Learning

4:45 - 5:30

Cybersecurity Impacts on International Trade
Governments have reportedly arranged to incorporate various forms of spyware and malware in Internet-connected products. In response, some countries have denied entry or imposed restrictions on imported products with such potential risks. But this raises many policy issues, including (1) what is a questionable country (and is it OK if an “ally” spies on us?), (2) what products are of most concern, (3) assuming such restrictions quickly become worldwide policies with retaliations, what might be the long-term impact on international trade and the global economy as Internet-connected products proliferate, and (4) what voluntary standards could be put in place to lower the risk of trade wars? These issues need to be rigorously studied in advance of policy makers making quick decisions – in some crisis condition – without understanding the impacts and consequences.
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Track 3: Technologies and Strategies for Sustainability

2:00 - 2:45

MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative: moving forward with industry
A sustainable world requires the capacity and support of industry locally, nationally, and internationally. Director John Fernandez will describe the activities of the MIT Environmental Solutions Initiative (ESI). As an effort focused on solutions to environmental challenges including the consequences of climate change, Fernandez will describe the multi-disicplinary and multi-faceted work of researchers, students, staff and alumni supported through the ESI.

2:45 - 3:30

Innovation in agriculture, water, food, mobility, materials and structures, and urban design
In this lecture, research and development in areas of agriculture, water, food, mobility, materials and structures, as well as urban design will be discussed. As the Earth’s population will likely exceed 10 billion people in just a few decades, technological advances to offer key resources will require accelerated research and innovation, presenting an opportunity for many new cross-cutting technologies. In this lecture I will review efforts in the MIT Civil and Environmental Engineering department that use a multi-disciplinary approach that break the traditional boundaries of academic disciplines, using diverse perspectives in engineering, technology, and science. Following a general overview, I will present a couple of select case studies that showcase how multi-paradigm and multi-scale engineering can solve problems in energy and materials.
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3:30 - 4:00

Networking Break

4:00 - 4:45

Informing design of resource-effective materials, processes and systems
Global demand for materials is immense and rapidly growing; extraction and processing of materials accounts for more than one-third of global carbon flows for human-related activities, on the order of 5.5 Gigatons/year. Direct materials production represents approximately 7% of total US energy consumption. This talk will describe the development of analytical and computational tools that consider the economic and environmental impacts of design, systems, and process choices relevant to materials use. The speaker will describe approaches to assessing the environmental and economic impact of materials and processes as early in their development as possible. The work described leverages information along the development trajectory including data mining of literature about laboratory synthesis, creating techno-economic models of protyping and scaled manufacturing as well as assessing macroeconomic implications on materials markets particularly for the case of substitution and shifts in recycling. The presentation will also describe an example on beneficial use of industrial byproducts in the built environment.
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4:45 - 5:30

The Business Opportunity of Sustainability-Oriented Innovation
How do we sustainably feed 11 billion people? How do we electrify the world while stopping climate change? Tackling these generational challenges will require innovation in technology, business model, and market infrastructure: the greatest R&D opportunity of all time. Jason Jay, Senior Lecturer and Director of the Sustainability Initiative at MIT Sloan, will share his approach to Sustainability-Oriented Innovation (SOI): a way to create successful businesses that help humans and nature thrive for generations to come.
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Track 4: New Technologies in the Age of Exploration

2:00 - 2:45

James Webb Space Telescope – NASA’s Next Great Observatory
A million miles from Earth, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use infrared vision to detect the first, most distant stars and galaxies in our universe. The Webb Telescope will peer deep inside swirling disks of dust and gas encircling newborn stars where new planets are formed. It will measure the sizes of planets orbiting other stars and the compositions of their atmospheres. Seeking to answer a major question – are we alone in the universe? In this technical session, attendees will learn about JWST, by the numbers. What do 13.5 billion and 1.5 million (just to name a few) represent to JWST, the world’s largest space telescope to launch? This session will also highlight the latest integration photos of the telescope and detail the latest status of the program.
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2:45 - 3:30

Mapping the Nearest Stars for Habitable Worlds
Thousands of exoplanets are known to orbit nearby stars and small rocky planets are established to be common. The ambitious goal of identifying a habitable or inhabited world is within reach. But how likely are we to succeed? The race to find habitable exoplanets has accelerated with the realization that “big Earths” transiting small stars can be both discovered and characterized with current technology. While future generations may use very large space-based telescopes to search to find signs of life amidst a yet unknown range of planetary environments, what will it take to identify such habitable worlds with the observations and theoretical tools available to us?
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3:30 - 4:00

Networking Break

4:00 - 4:45

Ecological engineering with CRISPR and gene drive
Encoding the CRISPR genome editing system in an organism causes it to edit the genomes of its descendants over successive generations, a form of 'gene drive' that amounts to a find-and-replace function capable of editing wild populations. Imagine a world in which mosquitoes are programmed to dislike the taste of humans, mice can't give ticks Lyme disease, and pests are precisely controlled by limiting their fertility, obviating both environmentally damaging pesticides and animal suffering. But this form of gene drive is likely to spread to every population of the target species in the world, ignoring all borders and impacting everyone sharing an ecosystem. Future public perception of CRISPR and biotech will be critically dependent on initial applications of gene drive. Can scientists ethically conduct ecological engineering research behind closed doors? Is it possible for many nations to agree without being able to conduct a field trial? By developing localized 'daisy drive' systems in collaboration with potential early adopters, we aim to give every community the opportunity to control its own shared environment without forcing their choices on others, to obviate the need for standard CRISPR-based gene drive except in direst need, and to establish a new model of open and responsive science and ecotechnology development.
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4:45 - 5:30

Community Biotechnology Initiative
As living technologies proliferate, how do we ensure that communities—diverse socioeconomically, culturally, and creatively—are able to not only experience its benefits, but are also active participants and agents of change? What are some of the key elements that are enabling the expansion of biotechnology’s reach beyond ‘traditional’ academic, government, and corporate laboratories?

In this talk Professor David Kong will explore the growth of biotechnology in non-traditional spaces and the creative ecosystem that supports them, including open tools, virtual infrastructure for sharing, and new programs for learning and education. In addition he will share advances in open hardware, including the application of advanced digital fabrication technology to the production of bio-hardware. From ‘Metafluidics,’ to ‘How to Grow (Almost) Anything,’ a distributed biotechnology course that is helping to augment the existing network of over one thousand Fab Labs worldwide with community biology labs, to organizing the first ‘Global Community Biology Summit,’ Professor Kong will discuss the expansion of biotech and its impact.
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5:30 - 7:00

Networking Reception with MIT’s Global Internship Program (MISTI) Exhibit
Meet students from the MIT International Science and Technology Initiatives (MISTI). Learn about their projects around the world and how their hosts benefited from their experiences.

- Alex Kimn: developed a neural network-based deep learning algorithm in Japan
- Emmanuel Azuh: inspired by his experience with MISTI in Israel, launched a startup to raise the next generation of Ghana’s R&D professionals
- Erica Santana: managed medical device development projects with a global team from the company’s R&D facility in Brazil
- Kalyn Bowen: developed an online arduino simulator in Taiwan
- Pelkins Ajanoh: developed neural network algorithms to predict faults in the electrical network in France

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* All schedule and speakers are subject to change without notice.