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Cambridge, MA

Supply Chain Strategy and Management

November 7-8, 2017

Led by world experts, this practice-oriented program investigates a robust MIT framework for better managing supply chains in today's rapidly changing markets. Participants will explore:

  • The next big trend in supply chain strategy, and the key skills required to be successful
  • How to better structure a company's supply-chain strategy
  • Guidelines for making strategic sourcing and make-buy decisions
  • How to integrate e-business thinking into supply chain strategy and management
  • How to blend recent developments in information systems and communication technology with sophisticated decision support systems and create a comprehensive strategy for manufacturing and logistics
  • "Clockspeed benchmarking," a tool for deriving critical business insights and management lessons from industries with the highest obsolescence rates of products, process technologies, and organizational structures (industrial "fruit flies")
  • How to assimilate sustainability into your supply chain strategy
  • Why all advantages in fast clockspeed environments are temporary

Many participants attend this program along with Developing a Leading Edge Operations Strategy.

In the past, supply chain practice has been primarily tactical, but this program presents a new and innovative approach to supply chain design, which will enable program participants to better understand:

  • The role of supply chain design in business strategy and why, if not linked, your supply chain design can undo a company's entire business strategy
  • Forces that influence supply chain structure?how supply chain structures change; how supply chain structures and industry structures overlap; and how these structures are affected by the speed of change in a given industry
  • Integrating supply chain design with product and process development
  • Connecting supply chain design with supply chain management and logistics
  • Supply chains in the age of e-business

Cambridge, MA

Implementing Industry 4.0: Leading Change in Manufacturing and Operations

November 7-8, 2017

The term "Industry 4.0" refers to the combination of several major innovations in digital technology that are poised to transform the energy and manufacturing sectors. From advanced robotics and machine learning to software-as-a-service and the Industrial Internet of Things, these changes enable a powerful new way of organizing global operations. But how should executives lead this change within their own organizations so as to not negatively impact production, customer satisfaction, and corporate culture?

Implementing Industry 4.0: Leading Change in Manufacturing & Operations is a new program designed to help executives implement large scale technological change. Topics discussed include:
* New business models and forms of operations that are currently being enabled by technological innovations such as the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)

* The "hidden factory" that results from a counterproductive and unpredictable mix of old and new technologies. Over time, this results in an unknown "process" that delivers defect-laden products behind schedule.
* The importance of decoding cultural and workforce factors prior to making an investment in new technologies
* The overemphasis on visioning at the expense of fully understanding existing systems, the context in which those systems are operating, and the people who must use the technology
Ways to increase a factory’s "IQ," leading to more productive and safer operations
* The role of the front-line leader in the adoption and successful execution of the new technology

Cambridge, MA

Innovation Ecosystems for Leaders: Delivering Sustainable Competitive Advantage

November 7-8, 2017

Innovation is a driver of productivity, comparative advantage, economic growth, and enterprise value. But innovation does not happen in a vacuum. It requires a network of participants—entrepreneurs, corporate managers, investors, researchers, university faculty, venture capitalists, government officials, suppliers, and customers—who comprise the ecosystem. Innovating in such ecosystems creates a new set of challenges for organizations and their leaders. Executives often find it hard to get beyond the buzzwords to harness the power of this phenomenon for their organizations.

This new course draws on MIT research to provide an introduction to innovation ecosystems, to demystify this important concept, alongside the broader topics of innovation and entpreneurship, and to explain how the right ecosystem can provide both an inspiration for innovation and source of competitive advantage. Participants will learn to understand their role as stakeholders in innovation ecosystems. They will learn ways to assess both their local and other ecosystems (including Boston and elsewhere) as potential locations for innovation centers, etc. And also to partner with startup entrepreneurs, research universities, ‘risk capital’ providers and other corporate/government stakeholders, on on accelerators, prizes, and hackathons.

Participants in the program need not aim to become corporate entrepreneurs or intrapreneurs themselves, but they should want to understand—as leaders and managers—how to access external innovation from the ecosystem, and how to lead on internal innovation.

Cambridge, MA

Developing a Leading Edge Operations Strategy

November 9-10, 2017

Enterprises are becoming increasingly global, with supply chains and manufacturing processes spanning oceans and continents. To navigate the global marketplace, senior managers need to know how to plan the most efficient use of material resources, as well as manage more complicated global networks and optimize service and quality. This program will draw on real issues confronting manufacturing and service companies today to provide a strategic framework for making the kinds of major decisions every company faces.

In this program, senior managers will learn new approaches to operations strategy that were developed at MIT and based on best-practice research conducted among the world's leading manufacturing companies. Participants will gain an analytic view of operations and strategic insights into:

* Vertical integration and the factors that affect strategic decisions
* Outsourcing, supplier power, and trends in supplier management
* Global facility network strategies and the future of supply chain management
* Strategic implications of process technologies
* Capacity and risk management, including capacity factors, supply and demand management, and the role of services
* How to survive in a world of outsourcing, and how to decide whether and where to go

This program is best suited for senior managers from manufacturing and service industries who are responsible for developing and executing operations strategy, including:

* COOs
* Strategic planners
* VPs of business strategy, operations, supply chain management, services, and product development; Operations general managers
* Senior project and program executives

in operations management. His latest book, Operations Leadership was published in 2007.

Cambridge, MA

Leadership by Design: Innovation Process and Culture

November 9-10, 2017

Leadership by Design will help both individuals and teams understand and practice human-centered design. Participants in this program will learn both strategic and hands-on techniques for structured exploration through prototyping. They will also learn how to enable an action-based organizational culture in which empathy is generated, trial and error is encouraged, and failure is celebrated as a source of learning, all resulting in successful innovation. It is intended to introduce the concepts of human-centered design to individuals and teams who are not already familiar with these design-based concepts and their application.


Drawing on the resources of MIT?s Integrated Design & Management curriculum and its new Integrated Design Lab (ID Lab), this program combines the inspired, intuitive methods taught in the world?s best design schools with the systematic, analytical methods for which MIT is world-renowned. This program is led by Matthew S. Kressy, creator and Director of Integrated Design & Management (IDM).


Course content includes:


  • Discussions on expression and culture
  • Field exercises in observation, exploration, and user empathy
  • Lectures on concept generation
  • Studio exercises in persona development and storytelling
  • Lectures and case studies pertaining to design leadership
  • Hands-on sketch modeling and rendering exercises
  • Functional prototyping workshops
  • Opportunities to build, test, and iterate prototypes in teams
  • Concluding discussions on process and leadership

The tools presented in the program can be applied to any range of human-centered innovation problems and opportunities including products, services and social/societal challenges.


By applying a design-centered approach to leadership, you?ll be able to conceive of radically innovative solutions to multifaceted problems, create a vision that gets buy-in from senior management and colleagues, avoid hazards, and create solutions that people love both emotionally and intellectually.

One of a Series: MIT Holidays

MIT Closed - Veterans Day

November 10, 2017

Systematic Innovation of Products, Processes, and Services

November 13-17, 2017

Design and development projects today face a complex landscape of interrelated challenges, including technological feasibility, customer desirability, business viability, and environmental sustainability. This program explores the process of systematic innovation in product development, business processes, and service design, with a special focus on the end-to-end design and development process, beginning with creation and ending with commercialization and ongoing product/service lead­ership.

The program introduces a structured approach to design and customer analysis processes that draws on important trends that have become essential to successful innovation in today's businesses: the digitization of all business processes; the blending of product and service into integrated solutions; considerations around environmental sustainability; and the use of globally-distributed teams.

Participants will learn how to lead these innovation processes in a fluid world where the best-made assumptions can, and often do, change midstream. Participants will also have an opportunity to discuss these frameworks and apply them to their own personal responsibilities and experiences.

The concepts and frameworks covered in this program will enable participants to understand:

  • Why the process of innovation can be systematic?structured, reliable, and repeatable
  • When it makes sense for entrepreneurial firms to compete directly with established firms
  • How to evaluate market opportunities and identify customer needs in a systematic way
  • What actions you must take to capture some of the value you create with new products and services
  • How to structure an effective concept development process
  • How design iterations, project milestones, and reviews can be used to manage  a staged or spiral process
  • How products and processes can be designed for environmental sustainability
  • How design of services differs from new product development 
  • What is the impact of Generation Y employees on the creative process

Cambridge, MA

The Innovator's DNA: Mastering Five Skills For Disruptive Innovation

November 14-15, 2017

Every great innovator, from Jeff Bezos to Steve Jobs, excels at asking the right questions. Day-in and day-out they seek provocative new insights by getting out of their offices and into the real world, actively observing, networking, and experimenting to generate valuable new ideas. By doing so, they improve our lives and grow our economy, finding new solutions to the most challenging problems we face. Innovative entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs act differently to think differently and, in the end, they make a significant impact.

Building on hundreds of interviews and more than ten thousand survey assessments, Gregersen delivers unique insight into the behaviors of extraordinary, and often disruptive, innovators. Participants of this new program will learn and practice important discovery skills that lead to new innovations ranging from product improvement to new market creation, to generate valuable, new economic growth.

These key innovation skills include:

  • Questioning the status quo
  • Observing the world like anthropologists
  • Networking with diverse people to get new ideas
  • Experimenting in small, fast, and cheap ways to reach novel solutions
  • Connecting typically unconnected insights to deliver disruptive new business ideas

To put these skills into practice, participants will identify an individual challenge for which they seek a solution and commit to innovating around that challenge throughout the two days. They will also engage in a personal diagnostic assessment to better understand their own innovation and execution focused leadership skills.

This highly interactive program will help participants:


  • Gain deeper insight into their unique innovation skill strengths
  • Build questioning, observing, networking, and experimenting capabilities to surface new ideas and value-creating innovations
  • Practice questioning skills intensively through individual and group exercises
  • Apply skills to a real individual challenge
  • Evolve their existing corporate culture to better foster these five skills

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