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167 Results | Page 1 | 2 | 3 | .. | 18 | 19 | Last | Next
 

Applied Cybersecurity

June 25, 2018 to June 29, 2018

In today’s world, organizations must be prepared to defend against threats in cyberspace. Decision makers must be familiar with the fundamental principles and best practices of cyber security to best protect their enterprises. In this course, experts from academia, the military, and industry share their knowledge to give participants the principles, the state of the practice, and strategies for the future.

Sessions will address information security, ethical and legal practices, and mitigating cyber vulnerabilities. Participants will also learn about the process of incident response and analysis. The content is targeted at ensuring the privacy, reliability, and integrity of information systems.

The majority of the course (about 75%) is geared toward participants at the decision-making level who need a broad overview, rather than those who are already deeply immersed in the technical aspects of cyber security (software development, digital forensics, etc.), although both groups will find the course valuable.

Cyber security is a very large subject. This course is only intended to cover the fundamentals of the current leading and pressing cyber security topics. The result is that we can cover many different approaches. We cover the introduction of a topic and after the fundamentals, you can explore further on your own. The goal is for participants to understand the utility of each topic, not to become specialists in any one subject.

Who Should Attend
75% of the course is geared toward providing a basic framework for professionals making cyber security decisions in industry and government and individuals seeking to immerse themselves in the pressing issues of cyber security, giving them the information they need to make the best decisions for the defense of their organizations. About a quarter of the course covers more technical areas of interest to those with more engineering-focused backgrounds, such as software developers or those working in digital forensics. Although those with a computing background would be better prepared for the more technical topics, an engineering or computing background is not required to benefit from any of the sessions.

Beyond Smart Cities

June 25, 2018 to June 27, 2018

The world is experiencing a period of extreme urbanization. In China alone, more than 250 million rural inhabitants will move to urban areas over the next 15 years. This will require building new infrastructure to accommodate nearly the equivalent of the current population of the United States in a matter of a few decades. Cities in the 21st century will account for nearly 90% of global population growth, 80% of wealth creation, and 60% of total energy consumption. It is a global imperative to develop systems that improve the livability of cities while dramatically reducing resource consumption. This course will focus on understanding the complexities of cities through the use of Big Data Urban Analytics and the design of New Urban Systems for high-density cities such as systems for mobility, energy, food, and living/working. The design of these systems must be resilient, scalable, and reconfigurable.

Today, academic research and industrial applications in the area of “Smart Cities” seek to optimize existing city infrastructure, networks, and urban behavior through the deployment and utilization of digital networks. Cities that employ optimization techniques have reported improvements in energy efficiency, water use, public safety, road congestion, and many other areas. However, optimization has its limits. For instance, the improvement of traffic flow in most cities can approach 10% based on current “Smart Cities” approaches such as sensing the road network, predicting the demand, and controlling traffic signaling. Research and investments in new urban systems are fundamentally critical because optimization will have little effect for rapidly urbanizing cities such as Bangalore, India, which experience around the clock congestion. This course moves beyond “Smart Cities” by focusing on disruptive innovations in technology, design, planning, policy, and strategies that can bring dramatic improvements in urban livability and sustainability.

This course aims to develop a holistic model for high-performance urban living based on the concept of “Compact Urban Cells” – a neighborhood area of approximately one square kilometer in diameter containing most of what citizens need for everyday life within a 20-minute walk. This course will introduce the following key elements for Compact Urban Cells:

  1. Resilient Urban Cells – compact, walkable neighborhood where places of living, work, culture, shopping, and play are within short reach and support a rich diversity of interactions and activities.
  2. New Mobility Systems – alternatives to the private fossil-fueled automobile are more convenient, affordable, pleasurable, and traffic congestion can be essentially eliminated: Electric-based and shared options.
  3. Resilient Energy Systems – microgrids, and locally-produced renewables create agile, adaptable, efficient energy networks.
  4. Living Space on Demand – hyper-efficient and transformable micro-apartments that are affordable, fun and productive for young professionals in the creative heart of the city.
  5. Shared Co-Working Facilities – co-working facilities, cafés, "fab labs" (fabrication laboratories), and other shared facilities support innovation and entrepreneurship.
  6. Urban Food Production – advanced urban agriculture systems integrated onto rooftops and façades of buildings efficiently deliver high-quality produce and help solve food security problems.
  7. Responsive Technologies – innovative systems enable powerful new applications that improve the life of each resident in areas of health, energy conservation, mobility, and communications.
  8. Trust Networks – privacy is assured for otherwise invasive systems that make use of highly personal data such as mobility patterns and resource consumption (food, water, energy, and individual health profiles).

The course will be divided into three learning methods 1) lectures by course faculty and guests from academia and industry, 2) participatory group design work in “charrette” sessions (a type of brainstorming), and 3) critique by faculty and invited experts. Using the MIT campus and the Kendall Square area as a potential site for deployment, course participants will work on a series of short in-class assignments that focus on solving practical urban problems. The goal of the workshop is for participants to engage in critical thinking about the technological, social, cultural, and economic challenges for achieving smart sustainable cities in order to return to their community, corporation, or institution to implement positive change.

Who Should Attend

Industry:
This program is designed for executives, business unit leaders and managers, financial investors and entrepreneurs, engineers/designers, and urban planners, from companies focused on the built environment, personal mobility and transit, energy, IT infrastructure, food, and Smart Cities development.

Government:
This program is also designed for government leaders charged with new urban economic development, design of new cities, and urban innovation districts or zones. Participants may include government leaders (e.g. mayors or vice-mayors), ministry and agency leaders, department directors, innovation managers, policymakers, city planners, and civil servants at the city, state, regional, or federal level. This course is open to government leaders in the U.S. and internationally.

Precision Engineering Principles for Mechanical Design

June 25-29, 2018

This course is ideal for anyone who wants to help their company develop new, innovative mechanical products. Participants from various industries from consumer products to medical devices to oil and gas equipment will learn a widely applicable, deterministic design process that covers discovery, development, and demonstration. The curriculum provides an introduction to the FUNdaMENTALS of Precision Product Design, starting with the deterministic design process and philosophy and physics-based design principles. This will be followed by focused machine element topics including: linkages, screws and gears, actuators, structures, joints, and bearings. Error apportionment, tolerancing, and budgeting methods are presented to illustrate how machine elements are combined to produce a precision system. Each topic is covered with respect to its physics of operation, mechanics (strength, deformation, thermal effects), and accuracy, repeatability, and resolution, all of which are critical to designing robust high quality products.

Participants are welcome to share their own non-proprietary design challenges. In the spirit of the MIT motto Mens et Manus, the course will demonstrate a practical application of the theory (mens) and design process through the conceptualization and fabrication (manus) of a small benchtop precision system in the MIT Hobby Shop. This program is designed to both deliver fundamental mechanical engineering concepts and apply them to a design process that encourages creativity. Attendees will learn how to develop and harness their organizations? internal talent by catalyzing creativity and deterministic design thinking. Interaction and networking with industry peers is integral to the course. Lastly, the course will be FUN!

Who Should Attend: The ideal participant is responsible for designing innovative new mechanical hardware products. As a leader, they must be willing to go hands-on and get dirty as well as enable others to lead their own product development efforts. Ideal participants include: VP of R&D, Director of Engineering, Manager Global Research, New Product Development Manager, Director of Corporate Innovation, and Design Engineer, along with their direct reports. Participants should have a bachelor's or higher degree in engineering or substantial experience with making, and must be comfortable working in a hands-on environment with tools such as band saws, drill presses, and manual milling machines. Participants must also have a moderate to high experience with Excel.

Tribology: Friction, Wear, and Lubrication

June 25-29, 2018

The study of friction, wear, and lubrication has long been of enormous practical importance, since the functioning of many mechanical, electromechanical and biological systems depends on the appropriate friction and wear values. In recent decades, this field, termed tribology, has received increasing attention as it has become evident that the wastage of resources resulting from high friction and wear is greater than 6% of the Gross National Product. The potential savings offered by improved tribological knowledge, too, are great.

The background of most engineers in this important technological area, however, is seriously deficient. For example, an undergraduate engineering student receives less than an hour of instruction in tribology. Moreover, most reference works of tribology provide little guidance to solving real-world problems.

Accordingly, this program presents current insights into tribology in a pedagogical form, focusing on such fundamental concepts as surface energy, elastic and elastoplastic deformation, microfracture, and surface interactions at the micro- and nano-scale. Additionally, special considerations are given to the application of fundamental knowledge to control friction and wear behavior through lubrication and the selection of materials and coatings in practical situations. Furthermore, modern experimental methods are discussed and several case studies are used to indicate how fundamental tribology knowledge can be applied in the design of tribological components and systems.

Who Should Attend
The program is intended for two kinds of participants: those who are active or intend to be active in research on some aspect of tribology, and those who have encountered practical friction and wear problems and wish to learn novel methods of solving them.

The course requires at least a first-year college course in mathematics, applied mechanics, and materials. Some lectures introduce more advanced concepts in these areas and in physical chemistry and thermodynamics. These will be reviewed where necessary to provide the required background.

Cambridge, MA

Developing and Managing a Successful Technology Strategy

June 26-27, 2018

A great idea does not guarantee great profits. If a company's R&D dollars are going to pay off in profitable products and technologies, it needs a strategy that not only makes markets, but also beats the competition. This program presents a depth of challenges that extend from R&D to manufacturing, engineering, project management, product strategy, and new ventures. It provides an innovative and powerful approach to developing and managing technology and products that people want to buy. The program material will also explore ways to link those technologies and products with a company's business strategy. 


Please note: This program was previously named Developing and Managing a Successful Technology and Product Strategy.

Drawn from MIT Sloan School's top-ranked MBA curriculum, this groundbreaking program will provide a framework for understanding how technologies and markets evolve; how they are linked; how technologies differ across markets; and how new technologies get accepted. This program will enable participants to:


  • Identify profitable projects for their research dollars and find out how to capture the value of those projects
  • Build technical capabilities for products that create value for their customers
  • Restructure their organizations to respond to market and technical dynamics
  • Implement their strategies for maximum benefit

Cambridge, MA

Leadership by Design: Innovation Process and Culture

June 28-29, 2018

Leadership by Design will help both individuals and teams understand and practice human-centered design. Participants in this program will learn both strategic and hands-on techniques for structured exploration through prototyping. They will also learn how to enable an action-based organizational culture in which empathy is generated, trial and error is encouraged, and failure is celebrated as a source of learning, all resulting in successful innovation. It is intended to introduce the concepts of human-centered design to individuals and teams who are not already familiar with these design-based concepts and their application.


Drawing on the resources of MIT?s Integrated Design & Management curriculum and its new Integrated Design Lab (ID Lab), this program combines the inspired, intuitive methods taught in the world?s best design schools with the systematic, analytical methods for which MIT is world-renowned. This program is led by Matthew S. Kressy, creator and Director of Integrated Design & Management (IDM).


Course content includes:


  • Discussions on expression and culture
  • Field exercises in observation, exploration, and user empathy
  • Lectures on concept generation
  • Studio exercises in persona development and storytelling
  • Lectures and case studies pertaining to design leadership
  • Hands-on sketch modeling and rendering exercises
  • Functional prototyping workshops
  • Opportunities to build, test, and iterate prototypes in teams
  • Concluding discussions on process and leadership

The tools presented in the program can be applied to any range of human-centered innovation problems and opportunities including products, services and social/societal challenges.


By applying a design-centered approach to leadership, you?ll be able to conceive of radically innovative solutions to multifaceted problems, create a vision that gets buy-in from senior management and colleagues, avoid hazards, and create solutions that people love both emotionally and intellectually.

One of a Series: MIT Holidays

MIT Closed - Independence Day

July 4, 2018

Advances in Imaging: VR-AR, Machine Learning, and Self-Driving Cars

July 9, 2018 to July 9, 2018

In this course participants will learn the latest trends and newest technologies to develop an imaging strategy that will create competitive advantage through visual data mining techniques. Advances in Imaging surveys the landscape of imaging hardware, optics, sensors, and computational techniques through a mix of theory, hands-on open-ended exercises (rapid prototyping), and practical applications. You will learn about and observe high-end imaging devices in up-close demonstrations and explore computer vision using installed cameras, connected cameras in the cloud, and OpenCV on mobile platforms. Focus areas include self-driving cars and AR/ VR where we explore current approaches and potential disruptions to the fields including review of hardware, sensor technology, imaging devices, and algorithms. In addition, we will examine emerging solutions, like machine learning, that are opening up new research and commercial opportunities in immediate and future applications, including VR-AR, self-driving cars, and others.

In this course participants will learn the latest trends and newest technologies to develop an imaging strategy that will create competitive advantage through visual data mining techniques. Advances in Imaging surveys the landscape of imaging hardware, optics, sensors, and computational techniques through a mix of theory, hands-on open-ended exercises (rapid prototyping), and practical applications. You will learn about and observe high-end imaging devices in up-close demonstrations and explore computer vision using installed cameras, connected cameras in the cloud, and OpenCV on mobile platforms. Focus areas include self-driving cars and AR/ VR where we explore current approaches and potential disruptions to the fields including review of hardware, sensor technology, imaging devices, and algorithms. In addition, we will examine emerging solutions, like machine learning, that are opening up new research and commercial opportunities in immediate and future applications, including VR-AR, self-driving cars, and others.

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