Where Industry Meets Innovation

  • Contact Us
  • sign in Sign In
  • Sign in with certificate
mit campus

Calendar

Include past months.

  • View All
  • ILP Conferences
  • All Conferences
  • Sloan Executive Education
  • MIT Professional Education
  • All Courses
  • Lectures
  • Recruitment
  • Event Series:

Events that include:

127 Results | Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | .. | 12 | Page 13 | 14 | Last | Next
 

Cambridge, MA

Innovation Ecosystems: A New Approach to Accelerating Corporate Innovation and Entrepreneurship

October 18-19, 2018

NEW for 2017

Innovation is a driver of productivity, competitive advantage, and enterprise value. But it does not happen in a vacuum. Innovation requires connections, just as entrepreneurship does, among key stakeholders?entrepreneurs, universities, risk capital providers, government, and large corporations. These connections are increasingly taking place in ?innovation ecosystems? and through programs such as accelerators, hackathons, prize competitions, and co-working spaces in which stakeholders and communities contribute and share resources (e.g., talent, ideas, infrastructure, money, and connections).


How can leaders harness the power of these open innovation ecosystems around the globe or in a specific region of interest for their organizations? If you are a business or government leader interested in engaging in an innovation ecosystem to find talent, ideas, and entrepreneurial ventures, this new program will provide you with the tools and frameworks necessary to take externally focused innovation and entrepreneurship activities to the next level at your organization.

Drawing on recent MIT research, this highly practical program helps leaders:

  • Understand why innovation is a challenge in their organization
  • Assess and identify the innovation hub(s) with which to engage (e.g. Boston, Israel, London, Berlin, etc.)
  • Consider how best to engage in these ecosystems?via hackathons, accelerators, venture competitions, etc.
  • Develop new organizational practices to break down internal silos and the ?fortress mentality? and shift toward a more open innovation ecosystem framework
  • Identify what their organization wants from the ecosystem?and what they can give back to it, with metrics that can track such changes


Participants in the program need not aim to become corporate entrepreneurs or intrapreneurs themselves, but they should want to understand?as leaders and managers?how to access external innovation and entrepreneurship from the ecosystem and accelerate internal innovation and corporate entrepreneurship.

This course is designed for executives in both public and private sectors, ranging from senior managers and corporate entrepreneurs to C-suite executives and future leaders. The program will also be of value to entrepreneurs, regional development officers, investors, and government policymakers.


Participants must be interested in encouraging innovation in their organizations or regions, especially through leveraging innovation ecosystems. Participants from both developed and emerging markets are encouraged to attend.

MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Neuroscience for Leadership

October 18-19, 2018

Research in the cognitive sciences is leading us to a greater understanding of how to improve personal and leadership behaviors and performance. Those who grasp the meaning and implications of this research will be positioned to take competitive advantage. This program provides hands-on application of concepts and techniques deriving from neuroscience and psychology that can improve your individual performance, as well as that of your team and organization.


Neuroscience for Leadership focuses on:


  • Your stuck neural patterns as a leader
  • The power of neuroplasticity in unleashing your brain agility and resilience
  • Creating the conditions for success in your organization by leading teams and shifting the culture from fear to trust
  • Visioning the future using the power of storytelling

Issues we will examine include:


  • How neuroscience techniques can be applied to leadership development
  • Understanding the scope of agility and diversity of thinking in adult brains
  • Mindsets?can you move from fixed to growth?
  • Deeply embedded leadership patterns and immunity to change
  • Basic human emotions and mindfulness
  • Cultural diversity and creativity
  • Ecosystem leadership

Participants will be offered brain-friendly catering, guided meditation, optional yoga class, and a confidential brain profiler report.


You may also be interested in Tara Swart's new two-day course Applied Neuroscience: Unleashing Brain Power for You and Your People.

Through lectures, discussions, and hands-on practice exercises, Neuroscience for Leadership will empower you to:


  • Raise your awareness of existing leadership behavioral patterns
  • Focus attention on behaviors and actions promoting resilience
  • Harness neuroscience to embed sustainable behavior change through plasticity of brain connections and pathways through deliberate practice
  • Implement measures to hold you to account and pre-empt barriers to leading sustainable performance

Cambridge, MA

Applied Neuroscience: Unleashing Brain Power for You and Your People

October 23-24, 2018

This highly experiential course explores neuroscience concepts and techniques to help leaders motivate and inspire their peers and employees in ways that catalyze innovation and increase business success. 

The course will take a deep dive into neuroscience concepts and techniques to help you—brain and body—through a method of unleashing potential in yourself and others.


Through a balance of theory and application, neuroscientist and MIT Sloan Senior Lecturer Dr. Tara Swart will examine the latest neuroscience research and how it can inform your personal and professional practices. Program topic areas include:


  • How to boost, refuel, and re-direct your cognitive resources
  • Embodied leadership and somatic practices (MIT’s “thin slices” research)
  • Creative and intuitive ideas for revolutionizing collaboration
  • Neural pathways that underlie procrastination, risk profile, and resilience (Swart’s Neural Tethering Model© based on research from MIT’s financial engineering department)
  • The impact of gender and cultural diversity on confidence and creativity in organizations and teams
  • Working with technology to empower human potential

Hands-on exercises will include enacting successful scenarios through creative, visual activities, guided meditation focused on peak performance, and optional yoga.


MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Platform Strategy: Building and Thriving in a Vibrant Ecosystem

October 23-24, 2018

In 2013, fourteen of the top 30 global brands by market capitalization were platform-oriented companies ? companies that created and now dominate arenas in which buyers, sellers, and a variety of third parties are connected in real time. In today?s networked age, the cloud, social media, and mobile devices are fueling this platform competition, and more and more companies want in. However, many companies do not succeed in becoming platform leaders because their technology and/or business strategies fall short.

While many platform strategies are well known (e.g. Apple?s iTunes), there are other less-heralded platforms that are exploring new ways to create and capture value. These include: dynamic pricing, usage fees, highly targeted product and service offerings, inbound marketing, and network effects.

Key questions the faculty explores include:

  • Is a customer segment with the highest ?willingness to pay? the most valuable segment?
  • When is tying a customer to a platform (sometimes called ?lock in?) counter-productive?
  • Which pricing formats seem to boost revenues but actually slow platform adoption?
  • How can companies get in front of the common evolution patterns of platforms?
  • When should leaders be wary of ?platform envy??

Through case studies and Q&A, experienced managers will emerge with insights for refreshing their company?s strategic approach and participating profitably in the multi-sided marketplaces of the future.

By the end of this two-day course, participants should be able to:


  • Identify examples of traditional and non-traditional forms of platforms
  • Describe the common evolution patterns of multisided platforms, including same-side vs. cross-side network effects
  • Identify customer and user groups whose affiliation with the platform is most valuable
  • Decide whether to try to ?tie? customers to a platform or not ? the value of open vs. proprietary networks
  • Design strategies to undermine an established platform or to defend against such attacks
  • Describe the principles of platform pricing and how to inform the design of an effective pricing format
  • Recognize the concrete implications of trade-offs in platform design, governance, and staging
  • Decide whether a given value proposition is best developed as a stand-alone platform, or as a complement embedded into another platform?s ecosystem?or whether to pivot away from platform strategies all together.

Cambridge, MA

Managing Product Platforms: Delivering Variety and Realizing Synergies

October 25-26, 2018

Companies from Airbus to GE use product platform strategies to deliver more variety to their customers and compete more effectively. For example, Black and Decker uses shared motors and batteries across a range of power tools.

These firms realize quicker new market entry and reduced costs but, in order to do so, they must orchestrate complex, multi-product development projects.

Recent research suggests that many firms fail to earn a return on their platform investments. This work has uncovered that many firms face systemic pressure to diverge from their platform sharing. Several cases studied realized less than half of their platform sharing goals. Are these failures the result of a flawed strategy or poor execution?

This course focuses on helping companies develop strong platform strategies and execution programs, by understanding the managerial levers necessary to operate in complex development environments. The course content draws on case examples from a diversity of industries, and is designed to engage executives, with explicit sessions for sharing and discussing industry experience.

At the conclusion of this program, executives will be equipped with a clear understanding of:


  • Named platform strategies and past corporate examples
  • Criteria for evaluating market conditions in which the strategy is appropriate and not
  • Identified management levers for use in complex programs
  • Key performance indicators for successful platform development
  • Benchmark savings and investment sizing data from other firms
  • Knowledge and examples of failure modes from past platform efforts
  • Differentiate industry platforms, supply chain platforms, and product platforms

Maximizing Your Personal Productivity: How to Become an Efficient and Effective Executive

October 25-26, 2018

"Since the Great Recession, many professionals have been facing more challenging schedules and more daunting to-do lists. This makes it all the more important for professionals to be able to get their work done quickly and effectively." --Bob Pozen, Faculty Director

Maximizing Your Personal Productivity will show you how to get more done in fewer hours, so you have more time to spend with your family, or any other activity. The program offers many practical suggestions on improving your productivity and provides many opportunities for learning through doing. The course includes digital techniques to help manage your career and your team.

Faculty Director Bob Pozen is the former President of Fidelity Investments and Executive Chairman of MFS Investment Management. Bob was first interviewed about his own productivity when he was full-time chairman of a large asset manager and carrying a full teaching load at a distinguished university. That interview went viral, so he wrote a short book (Extreme Productivity), drawing upon his personal and professional experiences.

Based on the book, this program is designed to increase the personal productivity of professionals through a series of case studies, practical exercises, and background readings. It will encourage self-evaluation through polls and surveys about your work habits, and provides ample opportunities for learning through doing.

Designed for busy, experienced managers, this program will increase your personal productivity by helping you to:


  • Prioritize your goals and align your time allocation better with your top goals
  • Complete your high-priority projects efficiently by focusing early on the final product
  • Develop techniques for moving quickly through low priority tasks like emails
  • Hold shorter and more productive meetings with clear agendas and outcomes
  • Manage your own team by learning how to delegate and set metrics for success
  • Manage your boss by communicating regularly and adopting complementary styles
  • Read with more speed and comprehension by focusing on what is most important
  • Write more effectively by using outlines, the active voice and strong connectors

To see how Bob Pozen teaches people to maximize their personal productivity, please view this short video on a presentation he made recently to an audience of 150 high net worth customers.

Cambridge, MA

Understanding Global Markets: Macroeconomics for Executives

October 29-31, 2018

The Understanding Global Markets: Macroeconomics for Executives program began in 2010, and quickly became very popular. In response to participant interest in additional content on the economic policies and choices of Europe and Asia and the relative success compared to the rest of the world, we now offer the program as a three-day session. The extra day allows participants to gain a more thorough understanding of the dynamics of comparative advantage, sources of international conflict and the varied responses of economies to crisis.

This program is designed to help executives understand and predict the medium-to long-run performance of economies in order to mitigate risk, develop growth plans, and make investment decisions, both locally and abroad. Participants will leave the program with a better understanding of the global economic environment, and learn to recognize the effects of the economy on their companies, so that their business decisions may be informed and appropriate. The tools and frameworks presented in this program will enable participants to:

  • Understand the nature and behavior of financial crises
  • Learn to interpret financial indicators
  • Recognize economic trends
  • Predict likely actions of central banks and governments
  • Make informed off-shoring decisions
  • Be successful in international investments
  • Gain a thorough understanding of the dynamics of comparative advantage, sources of international conflict and the varied responses of economies to crisis.

Essential IT for Non-IT Executives

October 30-31, 2018

Do you feel as though everything regarding IT takes too long and costs too much? Do you lack the language and instincts to make good decisions regarding IT? Is your company falling behind the competition in your use of technology?


Essential IT for Non-IT Executives offers essential IT management training to help non-technical senior business managers work with, oversee, and generate value from IT. Drawing on MIT Sloan research, faculty present strategies for instituting a working relationship between IT managers and business managers based on transparency?clear communication about IT performance and decision processes. The program is not meant to make an IT specialist out of every manager, but to make every manager confident in resolving IT issues and working with IT staff to make better decisions and to deliver better process change. 


This IT management course will help you optimize your role in the use of essential technology for competitive advantage.

Participants in this program will learn where IT is going, where it fits into their organizations, and how to govern it well. Managers will walk away thinking differently, being able to talk differently with the company's IT professionals, and armed with real-life examples they can use to adjust and improve their organizational processes. Namely:


  • How to design processes to use IT better
  • How to work with IT people to make better decisions
  • How to drive transformational change throughout the organization

Key areas of discussion will include:


  • Governance: Effective IT management requires active involvement from both business and IT managers. A firm understanding of roles and responsibilities for specific decisions will help minimize potential areas of conflict.
  • Discipline: IT cannot be everything to everybody. It is essential to set realistic goals and to manage everyone's expectations throughout any IT-related initiative. Discipline is essential in getting business value from IT.
  • Organizational Architecture: A well-managed, standardized platform is the foundation of IT effectiveness, risk management, and agility.
  • Transparency:Transparency is key to better decision-making and business value from IT. Managers should identify specific issues a company needs to solve through IT, define and follow assigned milestones, and keep close track of success metrics.
  • People and Culture: IT is more than just a technology challenge. Don?t forget the people and culture. Simply understanding the vocabulary and knowing how and whom to ask IT-related questions can help non-IT managers make great strides toward organizational change.

calendar