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MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Visual Management for Competitive Advantage: MIT?s approach to Efficient and Agile Work

November 3-4, 2020

This program helps executives understand how continuous improvement strategies, sustained over a long period of time, affect core business metrics and business development strategy and contribute to the success of the organization. This course equips managers with a fundamental understanding of how visual management?as well as their own approach to management?can be improved to create competitive advantage.


This program ? built on a foundation of highly adaptable principles and methods called Dynamic Work Design ? provides practical tools and methods for sustainable improvement efforts of any scale, in any industry, and in any function.


Proceeding from principles, not practices, is a key to sustainable change, allowing integration with current culture, and processes, while delivering fast results with little overhead of training or major initiatives. The method has proven to work in businesses as diverse as oil/gas, DNA sequencing, and engineering/innovation - and works at the scale of discrete problems or organizational-wide strategic efforts. Improvement begins to happen in rapid and natural ways; results begin showing up almost immediately.


Dynamic Work Design was co-created Nelson Repenning and Don Keiffer after a combined 20+ years of integrated industry practice and academic investigation, and further refined with insights and expertise provided by Sheila Dodge. Participants will learn how to implement this technique in their own organization directly from two of its creators. Through the process of visual management, they will discover how to identify the value-added elements of their own work and of their organization and more importantly, identify opportunities for improving and how to get started based on a framework of principles and methods.


Please note: The title of this program has changed. The program was previously named "Implementing Improvement Strategies: Dynamic Work Design."

The main purpose of this program is two-fold: one is to help participants understand how continuous improvement strategies, sustained over a long period of time, affect core business metrics and contribute to the success of the organization, from bottom-up and top-down perspectives; and the other is how to change the way managers see work and their own roles as leaders in the culture of improvement. This program will enable participants to:


  • Understand the principles and approaches that drive improvement; and apply them in all areas in the context of a particular company, thus creating a tangible culture of continuous improvement
  • Implement improvement naturally in their everyday work, not from a prescribed list, but from a deep personal understanding of the principles
  • Recognize successful improvement initiatives already in place and build on them
  • Identify the true value-added aspects of work performed by individual workers and the entire organization
  • Ensure that business targets and improvement activities are tightly linked at every level
  • Develop inquiry and evidence-based problem solving skills for individuals and for organizations
  • Transform managers from controllers to enablers by leveraging the relationship between designing the work well and the engagement of employees that follows
  • Generate ?pull? from within the organization for new methods of work
  • Make results (and problems) visible so that they can be addressed constructively
  • Not just remove defects, but learn how to design work correctly from the beginning

Cambridge, MA

Leading People At Work: Strategies for Talent Analytics

November 3-4, 2020


People analytics is a data-driven approach to improving people-related decisions for the purpose of advancing both individual and organizational success. This new program explores a number of strategies used to attract and retain top talent and illustrates how these strategies are being designed and used at cutting-edge companies.


While people have always been critical to the success of organizations, many business leaders still make key decisions about their workforce based on intuition, experience, advice, and guesswork. However, today?s leaders can improve their people decision-making based on the collection and systematic analysis of data.


Leading People at Work: Strategies for Talent Analytics focuses on the strategies that can be used to successfully design and implement people analytics in an organization. Faculty draw on the latest practices and research to illustrate how leading companies are using cutting-edge techniques to analyze data about their employees to and make their organizations and their individual employees more successful. In doing so, we will explore areas where talent analytics are most effective, and where it is particularly important to incorporate them. Participants of this program will gain a deeper understanding of how and when people analytics can be applied to improve critical issues such as recruiting and hiring, performance evaluation, promotion and training, compensation, and organizational change.


The program takes the perspective of the general manager when examining how emerging big data analytical approaches applied to human resource management can be used to advance business objectives. By the end of this course, participants will understand how and when big data can be used to make key employee decisions, enabling executives to position themselves as a strategic partner in their company?s talent management.


This course is not intended to teach statistics or programming. Nor will this course cover the issues involved when gathering (and analyzing) data. Instead, it is intended to acquaint participants with key strategies for the design and implementation of people analytics in an organization.


The goal of this course is to prepare executives to wisely collect and use data to manage people at work. Participants of this program will:


  • Become familiar with the most relevant topics general managers face concerning the management of people.

  • Learn a set of frameworks and theoretical models to help make key employee decisions.

  • Be exposed to some of the most cutting-edge techniques used by companies to analyze data about their employees in order to make their organizations and their individual employees more successful.

  • Understand how to apply big data analytics to identify, evaluate, and resolve a variety of challenges and issues relating to their workforce.
  • Learn how to interpret and present the results of their analyses to make strategic people-related decision. (This course is not intended to teach statistics or programming.)


By learning about strategies for talent analytics, participants will not only advance their company's business objectives through the strategic management of people, but also their own career.

Cambridge, MA

Managing Complex Technical Projects

November 5-6, 2020


This program enables participants to reduce the complexity involved in large projects by restructuring development and management procedures in ways that produces small-team results. MIT?s innovative solution, based on the design structure matrix (DSM), is devised to streamline complex projects by developing detailed models to understand the intricate interactions and iterative nature of design.

Managing complex technical projects is a massive integration effort at many levels. Product and production plans must be integrated into components, components into subsystems, subsystems into systems and systems into quality products.


Traditional project management does not provide the kind of detail required today to both accelerate product and service development and improve product and service quality in the 21st century. Managing Complex Technical Projects presents a revolutionary design structure matrix (DSM) that MIT researchers use to determine which tasks within each phase of a complex project should or should not be performed concurrently. The DSM method is already applied in a number of corporations.

MIT researchers developed the DSM modeling approach to learn how to solve problems facing large-scale projects. After field-testing DSM in dozens of organizations and industries around the world, they found that it successfully streamlined the development of a wide array of projects including:


  • Complex automotive components systems and subsystems

  • Aerospace configuration design

  • Concept development and program roll-out

  • Electronics and semi-conductor development

  • Equipment and machine tool development

  • Plant engineering

  • Construction projects

  • Complicated service development and delivery projects


Through lectures, exercises, interactive discussions, and teamwork, participants in the program learn how to use DSM to map complex and often highly-technical procedures into simple arrays. Most important, they learn how to solve five key problems that confound complex project management: iteration, overlapping tasks, architecture, decomposition and integration. In Managing Complex Technical Projects, participants learn to:

  • Better document existing procedures

  • Reduce complexity

  • Share data with confidence

  • Facilitate project flow

  • Expose constraints and conflicts

  • Design iteration strategically

Cambridge, MA

Marketing Innovation

November 5-6, 2020


You?ve created an innovative new product or service that could revolutionize your industry, but do you know how to successfully bring it to market? Are you prepared to assess market opportunities? Will customers readily understand the value of your innovation? This program is designed to provide executives who already have deep technical or functional experience with a thorough review of key marketing concepts as they relate to new innovations and new products. This course also covers new digital techniques and the evolution of marketing as a data-driven science.


Even the most brilliant innovation can fail if you don?t know how to market it. In other words, just because you build it doesn?t mean they?ll come. Marketing Innovation helps participants leverage marketing concepts and research to better influence the outcomes of new products and innovations. Participants learn how to evaluate market attractiveness, think about the design and management of distribution channels, and understand pricing architectures.


The first day of the course provides a strategic and practical approach to understanding consumer decision making, analyzing company strengths, and assessing the competition. This strategic approach is applied to real world examples to help technical executives learn to identify the right product for the right market opportunity. On the second day, the course turns to practical issues, including pricing architectures, building channel relationships and marketing communications decisions. Participants will learn the pros and cons of digital marketing and explore how to leverage new digital techniques to optimize marketing outcomes.


After completing the two-day program, participants will have learned a common language that they can use to interact more effectively with the marketing and strategy professionals in their own firms.


Please note: Marketing Innovation is replacing Strategic Marketing for Technical Executives, also led by Professor Catherine Tucker. Because of some overlap in curriculum, this new program is not recommended for previous participants of Strategic Marketing for Technical Executives from the last four years.

Participants of this program will learn how and when to contribute to their organization's marketing strategy. Technical executives and non-marketing managers will learn how to:


  • Develop a strategic framework for assessing market opportunities

  • Anticipate and take advantage of surprising inconsistencies in the customer decision process

  • Leverage pricing architectures best positioned to help capture value

  • Choose the digital marketing channels best suited for their product and market

  • Communicate more effectively with the marketing team

Cambridge, MA

Transforming Your Leadership Strategy

November 5-6, 2020


Successful leaders are moving away from "command and control" in favor of "cultivate and coordinate" strategies that allow them to:
*innovate and move quickly from generating ideas to executing and diffusing them throughout the organization.
* unlock crucial information, expertise, and new ways of working together, wherever these qualities reside within or outside the company

In a competitive "flat world" of smart, orchestrated networks, tiny firms that do not need huge capitalization to compete, and new organizational architectures, successful leaders are moving to make their organizations more agile, responsive, and creative.

How are they doing it? How can you do it? In Transforming Your Leadership Strategy, you learn about a powerful, innovative approach to executive leadership that lies at the core of leadership development at MIT, the result of an intensive, four-year research project at the MIT Leadership Center to identify more effective strategies for leading in a networked economy.

Tested in diverse, real-world settings, MIT's unique Distributed Leadership Model allows you to succeed as a leader by being flexible and adaptive in ways you may not have imagined, through the application of two key concepts:

* a 4 Capabilities Leadership Framework that makes it possible to harness, align, and leverage the leadership capabilities that exist all across your organization, and

* X-Teams, a revolutionary approach to creating flexible, outwardly- focused project teams that enables you to both keep current with shifts in markets, technologies, and competition, and accelerate the pace of innovation and change

The Participants

Senior general and technical executives whose organizations compete in an environment of rapidly-changing markets, technologies, and cultures, including: CEOs; Presidents; COOs; Executive Vice Presidents; heads of R&D, Engineering, Manufacturing & IS; Chief Technologists; Corporate Planners; Corporate Strategists; Vice Presidents of Marketing and New Venture Development; and other senior managers with leadership responsibility.

Faculty

Deborah Ancona, Seley Distinguished Professor of Management, is faculty director of the MIT Leadership Center. She is engaged in research examining core leadership capabilities. Her work includes the design and creation of leadership courses and workshops, a leadership model, and a 360-degree survey instrument.

Systematic Innovation of Products, Processes, and Services

November 9-13, 2020


This five-day program blends the perspectives of marketing, design, and engineering into a systematic approach to delivering innovation, and presents methods that can be put into immediate practice. The goal of this program is to help participants become systematic about innovation in order to create value for their businesses and their customers in the globally connected market.

Design and development projects today face a complex landscape of interrelated challenges, including technological feasibility, customer desirability, business viability, and environmental sustainability. This program explores the process of systematic innovation in product development, business processes, and service design, with a special focus on the end-to-end design and development process, beginning with creation and ending with commercialization and ongoing product/service leadership.


The program introduces a structured approach to design and customer analysis processes that draws on important trends that have become essential to successful innovation in today's businesses: the digitization of all business processes; the blending of product and service into integrated solutions; considerations around environmental sustainability; and the use of globally-distributed teams.


Participants will learn how to lead these innovation processes in a fluid world where the best-made assumptions can, and often do, change midstream. Participants will also have an opportunity to discuss these frameworks and apply them to their own personal responsibilities and experiences.


The concepts and frameworks covered in this program will enable participants to understand:

  • Why the process of innovation can be systematic?structured, reliable, and repeatable

  • When it makes sense for entrepreneurial firms to compete directly with established firms

  • How to evaluate market opportunities and identify customer needs in a systematic way

  • What actions you must take to capture some of the value you create with new products and services

  • How to structure an effective concept development process

  • How design iterations, project milestones, and reviews can be used to manage  a staged or spiral process

  • How products and processes can be designed for environmental sustainability

  • How design of services differs from new product development 

  • What is the impact of Generation Y employees on the creative process

Cambridge, MA

Implementing Industry 4.0: Leading Change in Manufacturing and Operations

November 10-11, 2020


In the race to implement new manufacturing technologies and systems, such as the Industrial Internet of Things, it is often forgotten that factories and operations already have systems in place?and the inner workings of these systems tend to actively resist any change forced upon them. This new program is designed to help manufacturing executives and frontline leaders implement technological change at their companies while developing a company culture that puts people first.


The term "Industry 4.0" refers to the combination of several major innovations in digital technology that are poised to transform the energy and manufacturing sectors. From advanced robotics and machine learning to software-as-a-service and the Industrial Internet of Things, these changes enable a powerful new way of organizing global operations. But how should executives lead this change within their own organizations so as to not negatively impact production, customer satisfaction, and corporate culture?


Implementing Industry 4.0: Leading Change in Manufacturing and Operations is a new program designed to help executives implement large scale technological change. Topics discussed include:


  • New business models and forms of operations that are currently being enabled by technological innovations such as the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)

  • The "hidden factory" that results from a counterproductive and unpredictable mix of old and new technologies. Over time, this results in an unknown "process" that delivers defect-laden products behind schedule.

  • The importance of decoding cultural and workforce factors prior to making an investment in new technologies

  • The overemphasis on visioning at the expense of fully understanding existing systems, the context in which those systems are operating, and the people who must use the technology

  • Ways to increase a factory?s "IQ," leading to more productive and safer operations

  • The role of the front-line leader in the adoption and successful execution of the new technology


* This course is not focused on the features or selection of specific Industrial Internet of Things/IIoT technology products or services. Instead, it is intended to help senior leaders in manufacturing and operations who are deploying Industrial Internet of Things technologies to obtain greater value from their businesses by diagnosing the states of their systems, measuring activities appropriately, and overcoming cultural obstacles to deployment of productive technologies.


In this program, executives and frontline managers will explore methods and tools that individuals, teams and organizations can use immediately to get the greatest value from technological change. Participants of this program will learn how to:


  • Identify current-state problems that need to be removed prior to the introduction of new technology

  • Eradicate "hidden factories" issues in process models and operations development of workforce skills

  • Successfully incorporate new technologies without disappointing customers, overburdening employees, and hurting short-term cash flow

  • Sequence the introduction of IIoT to accelerate adoption and time to cash flow

  • Use IIoT to leverage existing Lean/Six Sigma/continuous improvement efforts

  • Develop a coherent roadmap they can share with their entire company

MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Platform Strategy: Building and Thriving in a Vibrant Ecosystem

November 10-11, 2020


Over the past two decades, some of the most profitable and successful firms are those that have adopted a digital platform model?a strategy whereby the company allows two or more disparate groups to interact over a platform to co-create value; for example, website developers and users on Akamai, recruiters and employees on LinkedIn, and drivers and customers on Uber. In this two-day program, participants eager to develop or launch a digital platform approach will learn why and how their business strategies may need to be revised to be successful.


In 2013, fourteen of the top 30 global brands by market capitalization were platform-oriented companies - companies that created and now dominate arenas in which buyers, sellers, and a variety of third parties are connected in real time. In today's networked age, the cloud, social media, and mobile devices are fueling this platform competition, and more and more companies want in. However, many companies do not succeed in becoming platform leaders because their technology and/or business strategies fall short.




While many platform strategies are well known (e.g. Apple's iTunes), there are other less-heralded platforms that are exploring new ways to create and capture value. These include: dynamic pricing, usage fees, highly targeted product and service offerings, inbound marketing, and network effects.




Key questions the faculty explores include:



  • Is a customer segment with the highest willingness to pay the most valuable segment?

  • When is tying a customer to a platform (sometimes called lock in) counter-productive?

  • Which pricing formats seem to boost revenues but actually slow platform adoption?

  • How can companies get in front of the common evolution patterns of platforms?

  • When should leaders be wary of platform envy?


Through case studies and Q&A, experienced managers will emerge with insights for refreshing their company's strategic approach and participating profitably in the multi-sided marketplaces of the future.



By the end of this two-day course, participants should be able to:



  • Identify examples of traditional and non-traditional forms of platforms

  • Describe the common evolution patterns of multisided platforms, including same-side vs. cross-side network effects

  • Identify customer and user groups whose affiliation with the platform is most valuable

  • Decide whether to try to tie customers to a platform or not; the value of open vs. proprietary networks

  • Design strategies to undermine an established platform or to defend against such attacks

  • Describe the principles of platform pricing and how to inform the design of an effective pricing format

  • Recognize the concrete implications of trade-offs in platform design, governance, and staging

  • Decide whether a given value proposition is best developed as a stand-alone platform, or as a complement embedded into another platform's ecosystem;or whether to pivot away from platform strategies all together.

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