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MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Implementing Enterprise-Wide Transformation

June 19-20, 2018

NEW for 2017

We know through research and practice that two thirds of enterprise-wide transformation efforts fail to meet their intended objectives. Why? In today?s world, disruption can emerge from any place, any time and in ways unexpected. Leaders often ignore or miss the early warning signals, due to a variety of factors, including cultural inertia, lack of disciplined scanning and decision making processes, and siloed behavior that tends to discount troubling signs that impact other parts of the organization. When unit leaders turn inward to protect their entities, organizational agility becomes that much harder to achieve.


But effective leaders and their teams can beat the odds that their organizations? transformation efforts will fail. How? They set proactive agendas that create an inspiring future for employees. They build trust-based cultures of openness and transparency, combined with the discipline to spot and solve significant problems collectively as a team. They align the ?messaging? of their agendas with the metrics, milestones, and rewards that provide a clear line-of-sight for employees to understand how they can contribute and what behaviors are valued in their organizations.


During this two-day program, you will learn to spot potential derailers that prevent successful transformations; more importantly, you?ll learn how to become a successful transformation leader in your organization. Research based and practitioner led, the program environment is designed to help executives create a blueprint for their organization?s near- and longer-term transformation. Guest speakers will help to further demonstrate important conceptual examples, and significant time will be designated for peer collaboration and plan development.

This program is intended to help you:

  • Spot the warning signals of organizations in need of transformation
  • Create a proactive transformation agenda
  • Build a collective leadership capability to drive organizational transformation together
  • Create the disciplined processes to spot and address mission-critical capability gaps
  • Build the vital organizational networks needed to solve complex transformation challenges
  • Align messaging with metrics, milestones, and rewards
  • Create agile organizations by developing resilient leaders and employees
  • Develop a blueprint for transformation for your organization

Cambridge, MA

Implementing Industry 4.0: Leading Change in Manufacturing and Operations

June 19-20, 2018

The term "Industry 4.0" refers to the combination of several major innovations in digital technology that are poised to transform the energy and manufacturing sectors. From advanced robotics and machine learning to software-as-a-service and the Industrial Internet of Things, these changes enable a powerful new way of organizing global operations. But how should executives lead this change within their own organizations so as to not negatively impact production, customer satisfaction, and corporate culture?


Implementing Industry 4.0: Leading Change in Manufacturing & Operations is a new program designed to help executives implement large scale technological change. Topics discussed include:

  • New business models and forms of operations that are currently being enabled by technological innovations such as the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)
  • The "hidden factory" that results from a counterproductive and unpredictable mix of old and new technologies. Over time, this results in an unknown "process" that delivers defect-laden products behind schedule.
  • The importance of decoding cultural and workforce factors prior to making an investment in new technologies
  • The overemphasis on visioning at the expense of fully understanding existing systems, the context in which those systems are operating, and the people who must use the technology
  • Ways to increase a factory?s "IQ," leading to more productive and safer operations
  • The role of the front-line leader in the adoption and successful execution of the new technology


* This course is not focused on the features or selection of specific Industrial Internet of Things/IIoT technology products or services. Instead, it is intended to help senior leaders in manufacturing and operations who are deploying Industrial Internet of Things technologies to obtain greater value from their businesses by diagnosing the states of their systems, measuring activities appropriately, and overcoming cultural obstacles to deployment of productive technologies.

In this program, executives and frontline managers will explore methods and tools that individuals, teams and organizations can use immediately to get the greatest value from technological change. Participants of this program will learn how to:

  • Identify current-state problems that need to be removed prior to the introduction of new technology
  • Eradicate "hidden factories" issues in process models and operations development of workforce skills
  • Successfully incorporate new technologies without disappointing customers, overburdening employees, and hurting short-term cash flow
  • Sequence the introduction of IIoT to accelerate adoption and time to cash flow
  • Use IIoT to leverage existing Lean/Six Sigma/continuous improvement efforts
  • Develop a coherent roadmap they can share with their entire company

Cambridge, MA

Managing Product Platforms: Delivering Variety and Realizing Synergies

June 21-22, 2018

Companies from Airbus to GE use product platform strategies to deliver more variety to their customers and compete more effectively. For example, Black and Decker uses shared motors and batteries across a range of power tools.

These firms realize quicker new market entry and reduced costs but, in order to do so, they must orchestrate complex, multi-product development projects.

Recent research suggests that many firms fail to earn a return on their platform investments. This work has uncovered that many firms face systemic pressure to diverge from their platform sharing. Several cases studied realized less than half of their platform sharing goals. Are these failures the result of a flawed strategy or poor execution?

This course focuses on helping companies develop strong platform strategies and execution programs, by understanding the managerial levers necessary to operate in complex development environments. The course content draws on case examples from a diversity of industries, and is designed to engage executives, with explicit sessions for sharing and discussing industry experience.

At the conclusion of this program, executives will be equipped with a clear understanding of:


  • Named platform strategies and past corporate examples
  • Criteria for evaluating market conditions in which the strategy is appropriate and not
  • Identified management levers for use in complex programs
  • Key performance indicators for successful platform development
  • Benchmark savings and investment sizing data from other firms
  • Knowledge and examples of failure modes from past platform efforts
  • Differentiate industry platforms, supply chain platforms, and product platforms

Managing Technical Professionals and Organizations

June 21-22, 2018

Technical professionals' goals and incentives are often different from those of other employees, and so are the management challenges that arise. Drawing on the wealth of research and industry experience of faculty and leading practitioners, Managing Technical Professionals and Organizations explores proven, practical, and innovative strategies for maximizing the contribution of technical professionals. This intensive program focuses on the management and motivation of technical professionals in the innovative organization, and in particular:


  • How creative individual contributors work together on risky projects, processing information under conditions of uncertainty;
  • How to address critical problems and issues dealing with staff professionals and members of project teams, including cross-functional teams;
  • How to work effectively with prima donnas and independent spirits.

The Learning Experience
Organizations that are designed and managed for doing the same things well repetitively, as in manufacturing and operations, are not particularly appropriate for doing something well once, as in R&D. Running a technical organization presents a unique set of management problems. How do you motivate and reward technical professionals to maximize their performance and creativity? How do you create an organizational structure that will contribute to success, not inhibit it? How do you deal with creative individual contributors, project teams, and innovative professionals? How do you build and sustain high motivation and vitality while preventing complacency? How do you utilize "marshaling" events for building more collaborative, innovative activities? And how do you move information and technology effectively across organizational structures?


This unique two-day program focuses on issues critical to the effective management of technical professionals and cross-functional teams. Its principles and strategies can be applied in any organization where research, development, engineering, or computer-related technology developments need to take place in a timely, effective, and successful manner.

Participants will learn principles and strategies of crucial importance to any organization where R&D, engineering, and/or computer-related technologies lie at the core of the business. Upon completing this program, participants will gain a thorough understanding of the following subjects:


  • Managing risk taking and uncertainty in technical projects
  • Managing and motivating your technical professionals
  • Developing effective reward and incentive systems for technical professionals
  • Creating a highly motivating work environment
  • Managing and leading creative individual contributors
  • Maximizing the technical productivity and vitality of teams
  • Leading and managing more effectively across organizational structures
  • Leading system change within established corporate cultures
  • Transferring technology and information flows between and within organizations
  • Organizing for innovative product development
  • Managing the tensions among development efforts and cost/schedule pressures


"This was my fourth program and it was the very best by far. Professor Katz is Mel Brooks meets Yoda -- pearls of wisdom delivered in an extremely engaging manner. Highly recommended." ~ Past Participant Matthew K.

Cambridge, MA

Developing and Managing a Successful Technology Strategy

June 26-27, 2018

A great idea does not guarantee great profits. If a company's R&D dollars are going to pay off in profitable products and technologies, it needs a strategy that not only makes markets, but also beats the competition. This program presents a depth of challenges that extend from R&D to manufacturing, engineering, project management, product strategy, and new ventures. It provides an innovative and powerful approach to developing and managing technology and products that people want to buy. The program material will also explore ways to link those technologies and products with a company's business strategy. 


Please note: This program was previously named Developing and Managing a Successful Technology and Product Strategy.

Drawn from MIT Sloan School's top-ranked MBA curriculum, this groundbreaking program will provide a framework for understanding how technologies and markets evolve; how they are linked; how technologies differ across markets; and how new technologies get accepted. This program will enable participants to:


  • Identify profitable projects for their research dollars and find out how to capture the value of those projects
  • Build technical capabilities for products that create value for their customers
  • Restructure their organizations to respond to market and technical dynamics
  • Implement their strategies for maximum benefit

Cambridge, MA

Leadership by Design: Innovation Process and Culture

June 28-29, 2018

Leadership by Design will help both individuals and teams understand and practice human-centered design. Participants in this program will learn both strategic and hands-on techniques for structured exploration through prototyping. They will also learn how to enable an action-based organizational culture in which empathy is generated, trial and error is encouraged, and failure is celebrated as a source of learning, all resulting in successful innovation. It is intended to introduce the concepts of human-centered design to individuals and teams who are not already familiar with these design-based concepts and their application.


Drawing on the resources of MIT?s Integrated Design & Management curriculum and its new Integrated Design Lab (ID Lab), this program combines the inspired, intuitive methods taught in the world?s best design schools with the systematic, analytical methods for which MIT is world-renowned. This program is led by Matthew S. Kressy, creator and Director of Integrated Design & Management (IDM).


Course content includes:


  • Discussions on expression and culture
  • Field exercises in observation, exploration, and user empathy
  • Lectures on concept generation
  • Studio exercises in persona development and storytelling
  • Lectures and case studies pertaining to design leadership
  • Hands-on sketch modeling and rendering exercises
  • Functional prototyping workshops
  • Opportunities to build, test, and iterate prototypes in teams
  • Concluding discussions on process and leadership

The tools presented in the program can be applied to any range of human-centered innovation problems and opportunities including products, services and social/societal challenges.


By applying a design-centered approach to leadership, you?ll be able to conceive of radically innovative solutions to multifaceted problems, create a vision that gets buy-in from senior management and colleagues, avoid hazards, and create solutions that people love both emotionally and intellectually.

One of a Series: MIT Holidays

MIT Closed - Independence Day

July 4, 2018

MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Creating High Velocity Organizations

July 10-11, 2018

Some organizations achieve such exceptional levels of performance?time to market, quality, safety, affordability, reliability, dependability and adaptability?that it puts their rivals to shame. Though few in overall number, they exist in manufacturing, high tech, heavy industry, product design and production, and services, such as health care delivery. The select few are capable of generating and sustaining such high-velocity, broad-based, relentless improvement and innovation, that they achieve unparalleled levels of excellence. Learn what drives the success of these companies.


The Learning Experience

Creating High Velocity Organizations employs several teaching techniques: presentations, case discussions, video dramatizations, and an in-class simulation emphasizing a participatory style to maximize the opportunities for "learning by doing." The program material is organized into thematic modules designed around the four key principles of building the discovery capability in an organization?smart work design, creative problem solving, continuous knowledge sharing, and developing of discovery skills among employees. Each module consists of several sessions, which demonstrate, first, the positive impact through successful application of those key principles, and then provides examples of negative results when those principles were clearly needed but not applied. Each session is punctuated by facilitated small-group exercises, in which participants can actively apply the ideas and examples offered in class to their own specific, real-life situations.


Assignment Required Before Arrival

This program will provide multiple opportunities for participants to explore their own processes. Participants should come prepared to work on an important challenge in their organization.

This program will enable participants to:


  • Create an organization where work is done by harnessing the best-known approaches available and signaling the need for new knowledge.
  • Solve problems as they arise and to develop new understanding that prevents the problems from recurring.
  • Multiply the impact of local discoveries by making them useful systemically throughout the organization.
  • Lead an organization where discovery is encouraged, supported, and promoted at all times. 

The MIT Edge

Traditional business-school curricula tend to focus on teaching decision-making skills as a way to success. However, many companies today?especially those in relatively new industries?find themselves lacking the information or the experience needed to make the decisions that could determine their future. That is where the leaders' ability not only to think, but also to behave like innovators, becomes vital to the success of the organization. Known for its commitment to innovation, with this program MIT Sloan offers a rare opportunity for participants to learn how to channel their curiosity into innovators' behavior.

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