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MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Creating High Velocity Organizations

March 28-29, 2017

Some organizations achieve such exceptional levels of performance?time to market, quality, safety, affordability, reliability, dependability and adaptability?that it puts their rivals to shame. Though few in overall number, they exist in manufacturing, high tech, heavy industry, product design and production, and services, such as health care delivery. The select few are capable of generating and sustaining such high-velocity, broad-based, relentless improvement and innovation, that they achieve unparalleled levels of excellence. Learn what drives the success of these companies.


The Learning Experience

Creating High Velocity Organizations employs several teaching techniques: presentations, case discussions, video dramatizations, and an in-class simulation emphasizing a participatory style to maximize the opportunities for "learning by doing." The program material is organized into thematic modules designed around the four key principles of building the discovery capability in an organization?smart work design, creative problem solving, continuous knowledge sharing, and developing of discovery skills among employees. Each module consists of several sessions, which demonstrate, first, the positive impact through successful application of those key principles, and then provides examples of negative results when those principles were clearly needed but not applied. Each session is punctuated by facilitated small-group exercises, in which participants can actively apply the ideas and examples offered in class to their own specific, real-life situations.


Assignment Required Before Arrival

This program will provide multiple opportunities for participants to explore their own processes. Participants should come prepared to work on an important challenge in their organization.

Takeaways

This program will enable participants to:


  • Create an organization where work is done by harnessing the best-known approaches available and signaling the need for new knowledge.
  • Solve problems as they arise and to develop new understanding that prevents the problems from recurring.
  • Multiply the impact of local discoveries by making them useful systemically throughout the organization.
  • Lead an organization where discovery is encouraged, supported, and promoted at all times. 

The MIT Edge

Traditional business-school curricula tend to focus on teaching decision-making skills as a way to success. However, many companies today?especially those in relatively new industries?find themselves lacking the information or the experience needed to make the decisions that could determine their future. That is where the leaders' ability not only to think, but also to behave like innovators, becomes vital to the success of the organization. Known for its commitment to innovation, with this program MIT Sloan offers a rare opportunity for participants to learn how to channel their curiosity into innovators' behavior.

MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Creating High Velocity Organizations

March 28-29, 2017

What makes some organizations capable of generating and sustaining high-velocity, unparalleled, relentless improvement and innovation? This program will introduce the fundamental principles by which such acceleration occurs, give examples of those principles in practice, and give participants an opportunity to test how those principles can be applied and translated to their own work.

Some organizations achieve such exceptional levels of performance?time to market, quality, safety, affordability, reliability, dependability and adaptability?that it puts their rivals to shame. Though few in overall number, they exist in manufacturing, high tech, heavy industry, product design and production, and services, such as health care delivery. The select few are capable of generating and sustaining such high-velocity, broad-based, relentless improvement and innovation, that they achieve unparalleled levels of excellence. Learn what drives the success of these companies.


The Learning Experience

Creating High Velocity Organizations employs several teaching techniques: presentations, case discussions, video dramatizations, and an in-class simulation emphasizing a participatory style to maximize the opportunities for "learning by doing." The program material is organized into thematic modules designed around the four key principles of building the discovery capability in an organization?smart work design, creative problem solving, continuous knowledge sharing, and developing of discovery skills among employees. Each module consists of several sessions, which demonstrate, first, the positive impact through successful application of those key principles, and then provides examples of negative results when those principles were clearly needed but not applied. Each session is punctuated by facilitated small-group exercises, in which participants can actively apply the ideas and examples offered in class to their own specific, real-life situations.


Assignment Required Before Arrival

This program will provide multiple opportunities for participants to explore their own processes. Participants should come prepared to work on an important challenge in their organization.

This program will enable participants to:


  • Create an organization where work is done by harnessing the best-known approaches available and signaling the need for new knowledge.
  • Solve problems as they arise and to develop new understanding that prevents the problems from recurring.
  • Multiply the impact of local discoveries by making them useful systemically throughout the organization.
  • Lead an organization where discovery is encouraged, supported, and promoted at all times. 

The MIT Edge

Traditional business-school curricula tend to focus on teaching decision-making skills as a way to success. However, many companies today?especially those in relatively new industries?find themselves lacking the information or the experience needed to make the decisions that could determine their future. That is where the leaders' ability not only to think, but also to behave like innovators, becomes vital to the success of the organization. Known for its commitment to innovation, with this program MIT Sloan offers a rare opportunity for participants to learn how to channel their curiosity into innovators' behavior.

Cambridge, MA

Developing and Managing a Successful Technology and Product Strategy

March 28-29, 2017

A great idea does not guarantee great profits. If a company's R&D dollars are going to pay off in profitable products and technologies, it needs a strategy that not only makes markets, but also beats the competition. This program will present a depth of challenges that extend from R&D to manufacturing, engineering, project management, and new ventures, and provide an innovative and powerful approach to developing technologies and products that people want to buy. The program material will also explore ways to link those technologies and products with a company's business strategy.

Drawn from MIT Sloan School's top-ranked MBA curriculum, this groundbreaking program will provide a framework for understanding how technologies and markets evolve; how they are linked; how technologies differ across markets; and how new technologies get accepted.

This program will enable participants to:

  • Identify profitable projects for their research dollars and find out how to capture the value of those projects
  • Build technical capabilities for products that create value for their customers
  • Restructure their organizations to respond to market and technical dynamics
  • Implement their strategies for maximum benefit

This program is essential for senior general and technical executives involved in developing, managing, or marketing technology or products, or with managing organizations that sell their products in rapidly changing markets. The program will be most beneficial for:

  • Managers in technology-intensive organizations
  • Marketing and business development executives in technology organizations
  • R&D managers in any organization

Titles of past participants have included:

  • CEO
  • President
  • COO
  • Executive VP
  • Head of R&D; Engineering; Manufacturing & IS
  • VP of Marketing & New Venture Development
  • Chief Technologist
  • Corporate Planner; Strategists

Cambridge, MA

Managing Product Platforms: Delivering Variety and Realizing Synergies

March 28-29, 2017

Companies from Airbus to GE use product platform strategies to deliver more variety to their customers and compete more effectively. For example, Black and Decker uses shared motors and batteries across a range of power tools.

These firms realize quicker new market entry and reduced costs but, in order to do so, they must orchestrate complex, multi-product development projects.

Recent research suggests that many firms fail to earn a return on their platform investments. This work has uncovered that many firms face systemic pressure to diverge from their platform sharing. Several cases studied realized less than half of their platform sharing goals. Are these failures the result of a flawed strategy or poor execution?

This course focuses on helping companies develop strong platform strategies and execution programs, by understanding the managerial levers necessary to operate in complex development environments. The course content draws on case examples from a diversity of industries, and is designed to engage executives, with explicit sessions for sharing and discussing industry experience.

At the conclusion of this program, executives will be equipped with a clear understanding of:


  • Named platform strategies and past corporate examples
  • Criteria for evaluating market conditions in which the strategy is appropriate and not
  • Identified management levers for use in complex programs
  • Key performance indicators for successful platform development
  • Benchmark savings and investment sizing data from other firms
  • Knowledge and examples of failure modes from past platform efforts
  • Differentiate industry platforms, supply chain platforms, and product platforms

Essential IT for Non-IT Executives

March 30-31, 2017

Do you feel as though everything regarding IT takes too long and costs too much? Do you lack the language and instincts to make good decisions regarding IT? Is your company falling behind the competition in your use of technology?


Essential IT for Non-IT Executives offers essential IT management training to help non-technical senior business managers work with, oversee, and generate value from IT. Drawing on MIT Sloan research, faculty present strategies for instituting a working relationship between IT managers and business managers based on transparency?clear communication about IT performance and decision processes. The program is not meant to make an IT specialist out of every manager, but to make every manager confident in resolving IT issues and working with IT staff to make better decisions and to deliver better process change. 


This IT management course will help you optimize your role in the use of essential technology for competitive advantage.

Participants in this program will learn where IT is going, where it fits into their organizations, and how to govern it well. Managers will walk away thinking differently, being able to talk differently with the company's IT professionals, and armed with real-life examples they can use to adjust and improve their organizational processes. Namely:


  • How to design processes to use IT better
  • How to work with IT people to make better decisions
  • How to drive transformational change throughout the organization

Key areas of discussion will include:


  • Governance: Effective IT management requires active involvement from both business and IT managers. A firm understanding of roles and responsibilities for specific decisions will help minimize potential areas of conflict.
  • Discipline: IT cannot be everything to everybody. It is essential to set realistic goals and to manage everyone's expectations throughout any IT-related initiative. Discipline is essential in getting business value from IT.
  • Organizational Architecture: A well-managed, standardized platform is the foundation of IT effectiveness, risk management, and agility.
  • Transparency:Transparency is key to better decision-making and business value from IT. Managers should identify specific issues a company needs to solve through IT, define and follow assigned milestones, and keep close track of success metrics.
  • People and Culture: IT is more than just a technology challenge. Don?t forget the people and culture. Simply understanding the vocabulary and knowing how and whom to ask IT-related questions can help non-IT managers make great strides toward organizational change.

Cambridge, MA

The Innovator's DNA: Mastering Five Skills For Disruptive Innovation

March 30-31, 2017

Every great innovator, from Jeff Bezos to Steve Jobs, excels at asking the right questions. Day-in and day-out they seek provocative new insights by getting out of their offices and into the real world, actively observing, networking, and experimenting to generate valuable new ideas. By doing so, they improve our lives and grow our economy, finding new solutions to the most challenging problems we face. Innovative entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs act differently to think differently and, in the end, they make a significant impact.

Building on hundreds of interviews and more than ten thousand survey assessments, Gregersen delivers unique insight into the behaviors of extraordinary, and often disruptive, innovators. Participants of this new program will learn and practice important discovery skills that lead to new innovations ranging from product improvement to new market creation, to generate valuable, new economic growth.

These key innovation skills include:

  • Questioning the status quo
  • Observing the world like anthropologists
  • Networking with diverse people to get new ideas
  • Experimenting in small, fast, and cheap ways to reach novel solutions
  • Connecting typically unconnected insights to deliver disruptive new business ideas

To put these skills into practice, participants will identify an individual challenge for which they seek a solution and commit to innovating around that challenge throughout the two days. They will also engage in a personal diagnostic assessment to better understand their own innovation and execution focused leadership skills.

This highly interactive program will help participants:


  • Gain deeper insight into their unique innovation skill strengths
  • Build questioning, observing, networking, and experimenting capabilities to surface new ideas and value-creating innovations
  • Practice questioning skills intensively through individual and group exercises
  • Apply skills to a real individual challenge
  • Evolve their existing corporate culture to better foster these five skills

Cambridge, MA

Innovation Ecosystems for Leaders: Delivering Sustainable Competitive Advantage

March 30-31, 2017

Innovation is a driver of productivity, comparative advantage, economic growth, and enterprise value. But innovation does not happen in a vacuum. It requires a network of participants—entrepreneurs, corporate managers, investors, researchers, university faculty, venture capitalists, government officials, suppliers, and customers—who comprise the ecosystem. Innovating in such ecosystems creates a new set of challenges for organizations and their leaders. Executives often find it hard to get beyond the buzzwords to harness the power of this phenomenon for their organizations.

This new course draws on MIT research to provide an introduction to innovation ecosystems, to demystify this important concept, alongside the broader topics of innovation and entpreneurship, and to explain how the right ecosystem can provide both an inspiration for innovation and source of competitive advantage. Participants will learn to understand their role as stakeholders in innovation ecosystems. They will learn ways to assess both their local and other ecosystems (including Boston and elsewhere) as potential locations for innovation centers, etc. And also to partner with startup entrepreneurs, research universities, ‘risk capital’ providers and other corporate/government stakeholders, on on accelerators, prizes, and hackathons.

Participants in the program need not aim to become corporate entrepreneurs or intrapreneurs themselves, but they should want to understand—as leaders and managers—how to access external innovation from the ecosystem, and how to lead on internal innovation.

MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Negotiation for Executives

April 4-6, 2017


Negotiation is a daily practice within business organizations. We negotiate all the time--with clients and partners, vendors and suppliers, supervisors and colleagues, employees and recruits. Successful negotiation requires self-awareness, preparation, and practice. This program addresses all three requirements by providing extensive personalized feedback, tips for efficient pre-negotiation planning, and plenty of opportunities to practice and hone your negotiation skills. Drawing on fundamental negotiation principles based on scientific research as well as specific real-world examples, this program aims to enhance personal gains in negotiation, while simultaneously sustaining important relationships.

The MIT Edge

True to the deeply analytical and quantitative MIT style, the material in this program is based on extensive scientific research by Professor Curhan and his colleagues. Professor Curhan is renowned not only for his engaging interactive teaching style, but also for his pioneering research on the social and psychological components of negotiation. His research includes topics such as: conceptions of fairness, concern for personal integrity, lasting reputations, company loyalty, preference change during the course of a negotiation, norms for appropriate negotiating behavior, and relational dynamics among negotiators who interact multiple times

In this program, participants will learn how to:

* Leverage their own specific personality traits and abilities to boost negotiation outcomes
* Enhance bargaining power to claim a larger share of the pie
* Recognize and resolve different types of issues to create and claim value
* Develop strategies for efficient pre-negotiation preparation
* Build and maintain working relationships without forfeiting economic outcomes
* Deal with difficult tactics

Powerful negotiators are valued at all levels of an organization. If your responsibilities include interacting in some shape or form with others, then this program is for you. Typical participants' areas of expertise tend to include:

* sales and marketing
* planning and development
* operations management
* strategic partnerships
* supply-chain agreements
* recruitment and human resources

Course material is presented in a series of lectures, discussions, and engaging exercises that provide extensive personalized feedback and are designed to teach participants how to leverage their individual traits to achieve success and build lasting relationships at the bargaining table. Prior to the first day of sessions, participants are strongly encouraged to complete a detailed written questionnaire that will better customize the experience for each individual negotiator.

Faculty
Jared Curhan
Ford International Career Development Professor
Associate Professor of Organizations Studies

Professor Curhan specializes in the psychology of negotiation and conflict resolution. A recipient of support from the National Science Foundation, Curhan has pioneered a social psychological approach to the study of "subjective value" in negotiation (i.e., feelings and judgments concerning the instrumental outcome, the process, the self, and the relationship). His current research uses the Subjective Value Inventory (SVI; Curhan et al., 2006) to examine precursors, processes, and long-term consequences of subjective value in negotiation.

Deeply committed to education at all levels, Curhan received MIT's institute-wide teaching award presented annually by the graduate student council. Curhan is founder and president of the Program for Young Negotiators, Inc., an organization dedicated to the promotion of negotiation training in primary and secondary schools. His book, Young Negotiators (Houghton Mifflin, 1998), is acclaimed in the fields of negotiation and education and has been translated into Spanish, Hebrew and Arabic. The book has been used to train more than 35,000 children across the United States and abroad to achieve their goals without the use of violence.

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