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Cambridge, MA

Digital Marketing and Social Media Analytics

July 19-20, 2018

New digital technologies have fundamentally reshaped marketing theory and practice the last decade alone. Technology has changed the modes of communication through which firms engage with consumers. Moore's law has made the storage and analysis of consumer data scalable, creating opportunities for fine-grained behavioral analytics. New monitoring tools have fostered precise and personalized customer relationship management practices. The rise of mobile phones and tablets has enabled location based messaging and reciprocal communication. The ubiquity of video content has promulgated rich, native advertising programs. The global emergence of social networking has enabled networked based predictive modeling and new forms of targeting and referral strategies based on the preferences of consumers' peers. And finally, new social media have brought all of this onto the public stage, with word-of-mouth conversations driving brand awareness and brand loyalty, and user-generated content on review and ratings sites making or breaking demand for products or services.

This two-day course provides a detailed, applied perspective on the theory and practice of digital marketing and social media analytics in the 21st century. We will cover concepts such as the difference between earned and paid media, predictive modeling for ad targeting and customer relationship management, measuring and managing product virality, viral product design, native advertising, and engaging the multichannel experience. Throughout the course we will specifically stress the theory and practice of randomized experimentation, AB testing and the importance of causal inference for marketing strategy.

Topics covered in this course include:

  • Search marketing
  • Social network marketing
  • Social media analytics
  • User generated content management and marketing
  • Mobile advertising and commerce
  • CRM strategy in the age of big data and digital advertising
  • Earned vs paid media
  • Predictive modeling for ad targeting
  • Viral product design
  • The multichannel experience
  • Randomized experimentation
  • A/B testing

Upon completion of this course you should have a fundamental understanding of:

  • The digital advertising ecosystem and attribution and pricing models for digital advertising
  • The fundamentals of web and app analytics and KPIs for web traffic and commerce
  • Search engine marketing, search engine advertising, ad auctions, and strategies for optimizing search engine advertising
  • Social network marketing and social network targeting
  • Predictive analytics using social network data, peer-to-peer marketing and personalized social advertising
  • Targeting and segmentation, specifically demographic targeting and segmentation, behavioral targeting and segmentation, social targeting and segmentation
  • Social listening?analysis of user generated content, reviews, ratings and their effects on consumer demand
  • Mobile commerce and analytics

MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Negotiation for Executives

July 19-20, 2018


Negotiation is a daily practice within business organizations. We negotiate all the time--with clients and partners, vendors and suppliers, supervisors and colleagues, employees and recruits. Successful negotiation requires self-awareness, preparation, and practice. This program addresses all three requirements by providing extensive personalized feedback, tips for efficient pre-negotiation planning, and plenty of opportunities to practice and hone your negotiation skills. Drawing on fundamental negotiation principles based on scientific research as well as specific real-world examples, this program aims to enhance personal gains in negotiation, while simultaneously sustaining important relationships.

The MIT Edge

True to the deeply analytical and quantitative MIT style, the material in this program is based on extensive scientific research by Professor Curhan and his colleagues. Professor Curhan is renowned not only for his engaging interactive teaching style, but also for his pioneering research on the social and psychological components of negotiation. His research includes topics such as: conceptions of fairness, concern for personal integrity, lasting reputations, company loyalty, preference change during the course of a negotiation, norms for appropriate negotiating behavior, and relational dynamics among negotiators who interact multiple times

In this program, participants will learn how to:

* Leverage their own specific personality traits and abilities to boost negotiation outcomes
* Enhance bargaining power to claim a larger share of the pie
* Recognize and resolve different types of issues to create and claim value
* Develop strategies for efficient pre-negotiation preparation
* Build and maintain working relationships without forfeiting economic outcomes
* Deal with difficult tactics

Powerful negotiators are valued at all levels of an organization. If your responsibilities include interacting in some shape or form with others, then this program is for you. Typical participants' areas of expertise tend to include:

* sales and marketing
* planning and development
* operations management
* strategic partnerships
* supply-chain agreements
* recruitment and human resources

Course material is presented in a series of lectures, discussions, and engaging exercises that provide extensive personalized feedback and are designed to teach participants how to leverage their individual traits to achieve success and build lasting relationships at the bargaining table. Prior to the first day of sessions, participants are strongly encouraged to complete a detailed written questionnaire that will better customize the experience for each individual negotiator.

Faculty
Jared Curhan
Ford International Career Development Professor
Associate Professor of Organizations Studies

Professor Curhan specializes in the psychology of negotiation and conflict resolution. A recipient of support from the National Science Foundation, Curhan has pioneered a social psychological approach to the study of "subjective value" in negotiation (i.e., feelings and judgments concerning the instrumental outcome, the process, the self, and the relationship). His current research uses the Subjective Value Inventory (SVI; Curhan et al., 2006) to examine precursors, processes, and long-term consequences of subjective value in negotiation.

Deeply committed to education at all levels, Curhan received MIT's institute-wide teaching award presented annually by the graduate student council. Curhan is founder and president of the Program for Young Negotiators, Inc., an organization dedicated to the promotion of negotiation training in primary and secondary schools. His book, Young Negotiators (Houghton Mifflin, 1998), is acclaimed in the fields of negotiation and education and has been translated into Spanish, Hebrew and Arabic. The book has been used to train more than 35,000 children across the United States and abroad to achieve their goals without the use of violence.

Additive Manufacturing: From 3D Printing to the Factory Floor

July 23, 2018 to July 27, 2018

This course will build a comprehensive understanding of additive manufacturing (AM) processes and their implications for product development and manufacturing operations. Lectures will analyze AM fundamentals, materials, and process capabilities. This content will then be related to applications spanning industries including aerospace, medical devices, electronics, architecture, and consumer products. Lab sessions will provide hands-on experience with desktop 3D printers. Participants will design, fabricate, and measure components, and will identify future opportunities via case studies.

Additive manufacturing (AM) processes were first demonstrated more than twenty five years ago; however, only recently has broad industrial and consumer interest ignited, with potential implications ranging from ubiquitous personal fabrication to disruption of traditional supply chains. The goal of this course is to present a comprehensive overview of AM, spanning from fundamentals to applications and technology trends. Participants will learn the fundamentals of AM of polymers, metals, composites, and biomaterials, and will realize how process capabilities (rate, cost, quality) are determined by the material characteristics, process parameters, and machine designs. Application areas including aerospace components, electronics, medical devices, and consumer products will be discussed via detailed examples and case studies. Particular emphasis will be placed on emerging metal- and powder-based AM technologies, and related design principles and process standards. Lab sessions will provide hands-on experience with a variety of state-of-the-art desktop 3D printers and scanners. Participants will design, fabricate, and measure test parts, and will perform experiments to explore process limits. The course will conclude with a perspective on needs for future advancement of AM and major opportunities spanning many related business and technical domains.

Build a Small Radar System

July 23-27, 2018

Are you interested in learning about radar by building and testing your own imaging radar system?

MIT Professional Education is offering a course in the design, fabrication, and testing of a laptop-based radar sensor capable of measuring Doppler and range and forming synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. Lectures will be presented on the topics of applied electromagnetics, antennas, RF design, analog circuits, and digital signal processing while simultaneously building your own radar system and performing field experiments. Each student will receive a radar kit designed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory staff and a course pack.

This course will appeal to those who want to learn how to develop radar systems or SAR imaging, use radar technology, or make components or sub-systems.

During the course you will bring your radar kit into the field and perform experiments such as measuring the speed of passing cars or plotting the range of moving targets. A SAR imaging competition will test your ability to form a SAR image of a target scene of your choice from around campus.

Who Should Attend

This course is targeted for engineers and scientists who plan to design radars; use radar systems in a product or as the final product; work on radar systems, components, or subsystems; or are interested in using radar systems for observation of physical phenomena. Students will learn how radar systems work by attending lectures, building their own radar set, and acquiring radar data in the field. Those who should attend include:

  • Developers of radar systems or components
  • Users of radar technology
  • Purchasers of radar technology such as automotive and government organizations
  • Commercial enterprises seeking to use or add radar technology to their product, or develop a radar-based product
  • Defense industry or government personnel who want to learn how radar and SAR imaging works
  • Defense industry or government supervisors seeking to quickly educate employees
  • Unmanned vehicle or robot developers seeking to use radar sensor packages
  • Scientists who are interested in using radar technology for the observation of nature

You do not have to be a radar engineer but it helps if you have at least a bachelor?s degree in electrical engineering or physics and are interested in any of the following: electronics, electromagnetics, signal processing, physics, or amateur radio. It is recommended that you have some familiarity with MATLAB. Each student is required to bring a laptop (with a stereo-audio input) with MATLAB, because this will be used for data acquisition and signal processing.

Crisis Management and Business Continuity

July 24-28, 2017

Preparing for a crisis is not a luxury; it is a necessity. You know the odds are high that your company will suffer a disaster or crisis at some point. You cannot say you weren't ready; today's extreme public and government scrutiny demand that you should have been prepared.

MIT's "Crisis Management & Business Continuity" will help prepare you for the inevitable.

This comprehensive course provides up-to-date assessments and knowledge on issues that affect you - terrorism, pandemic, cyber security, communications, news media - from the experts involved with these efforts. You will have the opportunity to interact with these lecturers and with peers from industry and government.

By the end of the course, you will have the tools, knowledge, and understanding to benchmark, assess, and improve your business continuity, disaster recovery, and crisis management program. This includes the Course Manual (print and/or e-files), templates, and current articles. You will gain valuable contacts, have plenty of networking opportunities, and acquire insights for immediate implementation.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
This course is for the Business Continuity, Disaster Recovery, Emergency Management, and Crisis Management practitioner or responder as well as for the executive who oversees these disciplines. Other staff who would benefit from this course include corporate executives, directors, and staff from IT/MIS, Environment Health & Safety, Risk Management, Public Relations, Human Resources, and Security. This course is also suited for federal, state, and local government officials and Emergency Managers.

Both novices and experienced personnel will benefit greatly from this course. If you cannot go, tell your director/executive so he/she can attend to better understand your complex profession.

Crisis Management and Business Continuity

July 23-27, 2018

Preparing for a crisis is not a luxury; it is a necessity. You know the odds are high that your company will suffer a disaster or crisis at some point. You cannot say you weren't ready; today's extreme public and government scrutiny demand that you should have been prepared.

MIT's "Crisis Management & Business Continuity" will help prepare you for the inevitable.

This comprehensive course provides up-to-date assessments and knowledge on issues that affect you - terrorism, pandemic, cyber security, communications, news media - from the experts involved with these efforts. You will have the opportunity to interact with these lecturers and with peers from industry and government.

By the end of the course, you will have the tools, knowledge, and understanding to benchmark, assess, and improve your business continuity, disaster recovery, and crisis management program. This includes the Course Manual (print and/or e-files), templates, and current articles. You will gain valuable contacts, have plenty of networking opportunities, and acquire insights for immediate implementation.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
This course is for the Business Continuity, Disaster Recovery, Emergency Management, and Crisis Management practitioner or responder as well as for the executive who oversees these disciplines. Other staff who would benefit from this course include corporate executives, directors, and staff from IT/MIS, Environment Health & Safety, Risk Management, Public Relations, Human Resources, and Security. This course is also suited for federal, state, and local government officials and Emergency Managers.

Both novices and experienced personnel will benefit greatly from this course. If you cannot go, tell your director/executive so he/she can attend to better understand your complex profession.

Fermentation Technology

July 23-27, 2018

Fermentation Technology is the longest-run course in the MIT Professional Education catalog, having been offered continuously for more than 40 years. This course emphasizes the application of biological and engineering principles to problems involving microbial, mammalian, and biological/biochemical systems. The aims of the course are to review fundamentals and provide an up-to-date account of current knowledge in biological and biochemical technology. The lectures will emphasize and place perspectives on biological systems with industrial practices.

This course has made some major additions, modifications, and revisions in the course topics and course contents over the past couple of years. In recognition of the increasing number of attendees from non-pharmaceutical industries, we are rebalancing the course to provide equal emphasis on mammalian and microbial technologies. More than half of the lecturers are currently working in industry or have industrial experience.

The course is intended for engineers, biologists, chemists, microbiologists, and biochemists who are interested in the areas of biological systems in prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts. It is desirable that individuals enrolled be familiar with some of the general aspects of modern biology, genetics, biochemical engineering, and biochemistry. Some general knowledge of mathematics is also desirable for dealing with the engineering aspects of the course.

Modeling and Simulation of Transportation Networks

July 23-27, 2018

Modeling and simulation methods are essential elements in the design and operation of transportation systems. Congestion problems in cities worldwide have prompted at all levels of government and industry a proliferation of interest in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) that include advanced supply and demand management techniques. Such techniques include real-time traffic control measures and real-time traveler information and guidance systems whose purpose is to assist travelers in making departure time, mode and route choice decisions. Transportation researchers have developed models and simulators for use in the planning, design and operations of such systems. This course draws heavily on the results of recent research and is sponsored by the Intelligent Transportation Systems Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The course studies theories and applications of transportation network demand and supply models and simulation techniques. It provides an in-depth study of the world's most sophisticated traffic simulation models, demand modeling methods, and related analytical techniques, including discrete choice models and their application to travel choices and driving behavior; origin-destination estimation; prediction of traffic congestion; traffic flow models and simulation methods (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic); and alternative dynamic traffic assignment methods.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
This program is intended for analysts, engineers, managers and planners, as well as industry, government and academic researchers who seek to understand, analyze and predict performance of transportation systems. Participants with backgrounds in diverse areas such as traffic engineering, systems engineering, transportation planning, operations management, operations research and control systems are welcome.

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