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July 22, 2014Night pic of MIT dome.

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Real Estate Finance: Fundamentals

July 22, 2014, 9 AM - 5 PM

W. Tod McGrath

This course is finance boot camp for real estate developers, investors, lenders, lawyers and other real estate professionals who need to analyze the financial feasibility of real estate development ventures.

Participants will gain a comprehensive understanding of how investment returns are calculated and how income producing assets are valued. Designed for those without a financial background, this course integrates finance theory and taxation principles with conventional real estate practice.

Sponsor: Center for Real Estate

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Real Estate Finance: Advanced

July 24, 2014, 9 AM - 5 PM

Walter Torous

The ongoing turmoil in global financial markets has severely impacted credit markets and jeopardized access to the financing needed for real estate acquisitions and development. A thorough understanding of real estate finance will enable practitioners to take advantage of the rapidly changing sources of capital available to them. This course will provide economic, policy, and institutional insights into recent and future trends in the financing of real estate projects.

Sponsor: Center for Real Estate

Building 6

Silicon: The Most Perfectly Engineered Material

July 24-25, 2014, 4 PM

The Materials Research Community is invited to the 2014 Professor Harry C. Gatos Lecture

Dr. Takao Abe
Shin-Etsu Handotai

Lecture by recipient of 2014 Harry C. Gatos Prize.

The foundation for silicon single crystal growth was established in the US at Bell Laboratories in the 1950s with the determination of the physical properties of silicon materials and the development of the growth and evaluation methods. Siemens in Germany established the manufacturing method for the polycrystalline silicon starting material. Based on these early technologies, the mass production of single crystal silicon started in USA, Europe, and Japan, and has been in highest volume production in Japan since the 1980s. At the dawn of the single crystal production age, the senses, skills, and experience at the operator level were the major sources of knowledge, because textbooks about silicon melt growth did not exist. Today, however, the mass production and extremely high quality of silicon materials are due to nothing more than the natural properties of the silicon crystal itself.

I will present case studies of three major technologies: i) Dash’s necking method for dislocation-free crystal growth, ii) the new dislocation-free seeding (DFS) method for large diameter, heavy silicon boules, that I first reported, and iii) magnetic field applied CZ (MCZ) for stabilizing melt turbulence, first achieved by Hoshi at SONY. These breakthroughs have equally contributed to realizing over 300 mm diameter silicon crystals as the most perfectly engineered material.

A workshop on the Age of Silicon will be held July 25, fron 10:00 to 5:30, in the Chipman Room, 6-104.

The Gatos Lecture and Prize were established in 1991 with a gift from Sumitomo Corporation. The Lecture and Prize recognize significant contributions to the advancement of the field of Materials Science and Engineering, particularly in electronic materials processing, behavior, and application.

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Real Estate Finance: Advanced

July 25, 2014, 9 AM - 5 PM

Walter Torous

The ongoing turmoil in global financial markets has severely impacted credit markets and jeopardized access to the financing needed for real estate acquisitions and development. A thorough understanding of real estate finance will enable practitioners to take advantage of the rapidly changing sources of capital available to them. This course will provide economic, policy, and institutional insights into recent and future trends in the financing of real estate projects.

Sponsor: Center for Real Estate

Building 32 Map

One of a Series: CIS/Microsoft Seminar

Large-Scale Secure Computation

July 25, 2014, 10:30 AM - 12 PM

Elette Boyle
Postdoctoral Researcher
Technion Institute of Technology

Host: Vinod Vaikuntanathan*

Abstract:

A secure multi-party computation (MPC) protocol enables mutually untrusting parties to jointly evaluate a function f over their private inputs, while guaranteeing that information on their inputs will not be revealed beyond the function output.

We are interested in secure computation protocols in settings where the number of parties is huge, and their data even larger. In this regime, the efficiency of existing solutions breaks down: either requiring resources linear in the circuit representation size of the function, or requiring parties to store and communicate information on the order of all parties' combined inputs.

Assuming the existence of a single-use broadcast channel (per player), we demonstrate statistically secure n-party computation protocols for computing (multiple) arbitrary dynamic RAM programs over parties' inputs, handling (1/3-?) fraction static corruptions, while preserving up to polylogarithmic factors the computation and memory complexities of the RAM program. Additionally, our protocol is load balanced across all parties, and achieves polylogarithmic communication locality (i.e., each party only ever needs to speak to polylog(n) other parties).

Joint work with Kai-Min Chung and Rafael Pass.

Build a Multi-Channel Search and Track Radar

July 28 - August 1, 2014

Are you interested in learning about using multi-channel phased array radar systems through hands-on construction and experiment?

MIT Professional Education is offering a unique course in the design, fabrication, and testing of a laptop-based phased array radar sensor capable of ground moving target imaging (GMTI) using analog and digital beamforming, along with applications of tracker principles on the acquired images.

Lectures will be presented on the topics of applied electromagnetics, antennas, RF design, analog circuits, phased array radar calibration, and digital signal processing, while at the same time you build your own radar channel and perform field experiments both individually and as a group. Each student will receive a single channel radar kit, designed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory staff, and a course pack. The group experiments will utilize these kits to populate a shared phased array asset and explore beamforming and calibration.

This course will appeal to those who want to learn array-based radar systems engineering, analog and digital beamforming, or tracking; use radar technology in a product or experiment; or make components or sub-systems.

You do not have to be a radar engineer but it helps if you have at least a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering or physics and are interested in any of the following: electronics, electromagnetics, signal processing, physics, or amateur radio. It is recommended that you have some familiarity with MATLAB. Each student is required to bring a laptop with MATLAB installed. Primary support for the provided software will be for MATLAB version 2009a or newer and the Microsoft Windows operating system. Instructors will make every effort to support other configurations.

During the course you will bring your radar kit into the field and perform range time intensity (RTI) and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) experiments. There will then be group experiments using multiple radar units as receive channels for a digital phased array. These experiments will include topics of array calibration and analog and digital beamforming, while collecting GMTI images of an urban target scene. Additionally, development of algorithms for tracking multiple targets in the RTI and GMTI images will be undertaken.

Who Should Attend

You do not have to be a radar engineer but it helps if you have at least a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering or physics and are interested in any of the following: electronics, electromagnetics, signal processing, physics, or amateur radio. It is recommended that you have some familiarity with MATLAB.

This course is targeted for engineers and scientists who plan to design phased array radars or sensors; use phased array radar systems in a product or as the final product; work on phased array radar systems, components, or subsystems; or are interested in using phased array radar systems for observation of physical phenomena. Students will learn how radar systems work by attending lectures, building a phased array radar, and acquiring data in the field. Those who should attend include:

  • Developers of radar systems or components
  • Users of radar technology
  • Purchasers of radar technology such as automotive and government organizations
  • Commercial enterprises seeking to use or add radar technology to their product or develop a radar-based product
  • Defense industry or government personnel who want to learn how radar and SAR imaging works
  • Defense industry or government supervisors seeking to quickly educate employees
  • Unmanned vehicle or robot developers seeking to use radar sensor packages
  • Scientists who are interested in using radar technology for the observation of nature

Modeling and Simulation of Transportation Networks

July 28 - August 1, 2014

Modeling and simulation methods are essential elements in the design and operation of transportation systems. Congestion problems in cities worldwide have prompted at all levels of government and industry a proliferation of interest in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) that include advanced supply and demand management techniques. Such techniques include real-time traffic control measures and real-time traveler information and guidance systems whose purpose is to assist travelers in making departure time, mode and route choice decisions. Transportation researchers have developed models and simulators for use in the planning, design and operations of such systems. This course draws heavily on the results of recent research and is sponsored by the Intelligent Transportation Systems Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The course studies theories and applications of transportation network demand and supply models and simulation techniques. It provides an in-depth study of the world's most sophisticated traffic simulation models, demand modeling methods, and related analytical techniques, including discrete choice models and their application to travel choices and driving behavior; origin-destination estimation; prediction of traffic congestion; traffic flow models and simulation methods (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic); and alternative dynamic traffic assignment methods.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
This program is intended for analysts, engineers, managers and planners, as well as industry, government and academic researchers who seek to understand, analyze and predict performance of transportation systems. Participants with backgrounds in diverse areas such as traffic engineering, systems engineering, transportation planning, operations management, operations research and control systems are welcome.

Product Platform and Product Family Design: From Strategy to Implementation

July 28 - August 1, 2014

This course explores how product architecture, platforms and commonality can help a firm deploy and manage a family of products in a competitive manner. We will examine both strategic as well as implementation aspects of this challenge. A key strategy is to develop and manufacture a family of product variants derived from a common platform and/or modular architecture. Reuse of components, processes and design solutions leads to advantages in learning curves and economies of scale, which have to be carefully balanced against the desire for product customization and competitive pressures. Additionally, platform strategies can lead to innovation and generation of new revenue growth, by intelligently leveraging existing brands, modules, and sub-system technologies. We will present the latest theory as well as a number of case studies and industrial examples on this important topic. We will engage the course participants through interactive discussion and hands-on activities. Recent strategic issues such as embedding flexibility in product platforms as well as the effect of platforms on a firm's cost structure, organization, and market segmentation will also be presented.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
This course is targeted towards executive decision makers, product managers, marketing managers, product line strategists, product architects, as well as platform and systems engineers in industrial and government contexts. Such individuals will have to strategically position their products and systems in a competitive marketplace and define modular and scalable product architectures, utilizing standardization, commonalization, customization and platform leveraging strategies to maximize cost savings while increasing the capability to offer a variety of customized systems and products. A basic background in mechanical and/or electrical engineering, as well as some business and accounting experience is beneficial but not required.

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