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Charlestown Navy Yard 149 13th St

One of a Series: Brainmap Seminar

Planetary Health: The Impacts of Global Environmental Change on Patient and Planet

March 29, 2017, 12-1 PM

Latha Samway
Global Health Justice Partnership Fellow
Yale Law School

Bio:
Latha Swamy’s work broadly examines the relationship between environmental degradation and human health. Her current research focuses on tropical resources, health systems strengthening and access, food justice and security, gender equity, postcolonialism, and the linkages between these in the midst of global environmental change – particularly their effects on those living in poverty, and innovative solutions that challenge the resulting
systems of oppression. She was recruited to her current position as Senior Advisor in Planetary Health to Ernesto Zedillo (Chair of the new Rockefeller Foundation Economic Council on Planetary Health, Director of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, and former President of Mexico), and also advises on the Center's Universal Health Coverage Steering Committee.

During her studies at Yale University's School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Latha worked in India and Nepal with the MIT Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab evaluating rural farmers’ social networks to promote new climate-smart agriculture technologies; in Haiti with Hôpital Albert Schweitzer transitioning smallholder farmers to agroforestry techniques to jointly address chronic malnutrition and massive deforestation; and in West Borneo, Indonesia conducting an independent program evaluation at a rural clinic (Health in Harmony) that aims to disincentivize illegal logging by providing reduced cost healthcare services in return for forest stewardship.

Latha is a Global Health Justice Partnership Fellow at Yale Law School, serves as a UN Ambassador for Women’s Environment and Development Organization, and sits on the Junior Board of EcoHealth Alliance. Latha holds a Master in Environmental Management from Yale University, an M.Sc. in Neuroscience and Clinical Investigation from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and a B.S. in Cellular Biology with a minor concentration in Percussion and Ethnomusicology from the University of Georgia.

Essential IT for Non-IT Executives

March 30-31, 2017

Do you feel as though everything regarding IT takes too long and costs too much? Do you lack the language and instincts to make good decisions regarding IT? Is your company falling behind the competition in your use of technology?


Essential IT for Non-IT Executives offers essential IT management training to help non-technical senior business managers work with, oversee, and generate value from IT. Drawing on MIT Sloan research, faculty present strategies for instituting a working relationship between IT managers and business managers based on transparency?clear communication about IT performance and decision processes. The program is not meant to make an IT specialist out of every manager, but to make every manager confident in resolving IT issues and working with IT staff to make better decisions and to deliver better process change. 


This IT management course will help you optimize your role in the use of essential technology for competitive advantage.

Participants in this program will learn where IT is going, where it fits into their organizations, and how to govern it well. Managers will walk away thinking differently, being able to talk differently with the company's IT professionals, and armed with real-life examples they can use to adjust and improve their organizational processes. Namely:


  • How to design processes to use IT better
  • How to work with IT people to make better decisions
  • How to drive transformational change throughout the organization

Key areas of discussion will include:


  • Governance: Effective IT management requires active involvement from both business and IT managers. A firm understanding of roles and responsibilities for specific decisions will help minimize potential areas of conflict.
  • Discipline: IT cannot be everything to everybody. It is essential to set realistic goals and to manage everyone's expectations throughout any IT-related initiative. Discipline is essential in getting business value from IT.
  • Organizational Architecture: A well-managed, standardized platform is the foundation of IT effectiveness, risk management, and agility.
  • Transparency:Transparency is key to better decision-making and business value from IT. Managers should identify specific issues a company needs to solve through IT, define and follow assigned milestones, and keep close track of success metrics.
  • People and Culture: IT is more than just a technology challenge. Don?t forget the people and culture. Simply understanding the vocabulary and knowing how and whom to ask IT-related questions can help non-IT managers make great strides toward organizational change.

Cambridge, MA

The Innovator's DNA: Mastering Five Skills For Disruptive Innovation

March 30-31, 2017

Every great innovator, from Jeff Bezos to Steve Jobs, excels at asking the right questions. Day-in and day-out they seek provocative new insights by getting out of their offices and into the real world, actively observing, networking, and experimenting to generate valuable new ideas. By doing so, they improve our lives and grow our economy, finding new solutions to the most challenging problems we face. Innovative entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs act differently to think differently and, in the end, they make a significant impact.

Building on hundreds of interviews and more than ten thousand survey assessments, Gregersen delivers unique insight into the behaviors of extraordinary, and often disruptive, innovators. Participants of this new program will learn and practice important discovery skills that lead to new innovations ranging from product improvement to new market creation, to generate valuable, new economic growth.

These key innovation skills include:

  • Questioning the status quo
  • Observing the world like anthropologists
  • Networking with diverse people to get new ideas
  • Experimenting in small, fast, and cheap ways to reach novel solutions
  • Connecting typically unconnected insights to deliver disruptive new business ideas

To put these skills into practice, participants will identify an individual challenge for which they seek a solution and commit to innovating around that challenge throughout the two days. They will also engage in a personal diagnostic assessment to better understand their own innovation and execution focused leadership skills.

This highly interactive program will help participants:


  • Gain deeper insight into their unique innovation skill strengths
  • Build questioning, observing, networking, and experimenting capabilities to surface new ideas and value-creating innovations
  • Practice questioning skills intensively through individual and group exercises
  • Apply skills to a real individual challenge
  • Evolve their existing corporate culture to better foster these five skills

Cambridge, MA

Innovation Ecosystems for Leaders: Delivering Sustainable Competitive Advantage

March 30-31, 2017

Innovation is a driver of productivity, comparative advantage, economic growth, and enterprise value. But innovation does not happen in a vacuum. It requires a network of participants—entrepreneurs, corporate managers, investors, researchers, university faculty, venture capitalists, government officials, suppliers, and customers—who comprise the ecosystem. Innovating in such ecosystems creates a new set of challenges for organizations and their leaders. Executives often find it hard to get beyond the buzzwords to harness the power of this phenomenon for their organizations.

This new course draws on MIT research to provide an introduction to innovation ecosystems, to demystify this important concept, alongside the broader topics of innovation and entpreneurship, and to explain how the right ecosystem can provide both an inspiration for innovation and source of competitive advantage. Participants will learn to understand their role as stakeholders in innovation ecosystems. They will learn ways to assess both their local and other ecosystems (including Boston and elsewhere) as potential locations for innovation centers, etc. And also to partner with startup entrepreneurs, research universities, ‘risk capital’ providers and other corporate/government stakeholders, on on accelerators, prizes, and hackathons.

Participants in the program need not aim to become corporate entrepreneurs or intrapreneurs themselves, but they should want to understand—as leaders and managers—how to access external innovation from the ecosystem, and how to lead on internal innovation.

MIT Campus, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Negotiation for Executives

April 4-6, 2017


Negotiation is a daily practice within business organizations. We negotiate all the time--with clients and partners, vendors and suppliers, supervisors and colleagues, employees and recruits. Successful negotiation requires self-awareness, preparation, and practice. This program addresses all three requirements by providing extensive personalized feedback, tips for efficient pre-negotiation planning, and plenty of opportunities to practice and hone your negotiation skills. Drawing on fundamental negotiation principles based on scientific research as well as specific real-world examples, this program aims to enhance personal gains in negotiation, while simultaneously sustaining important relationships.

The MIT Edge

True to the deeply analytical and quantitative MIT style, the material in this program is based on extensive scientific research by Professor Curhan and his colleagues. Professor Curhan is renowned not only for his engaging interactive teaching style, but also for his pioneering research on the social and psychological components of negotiation. His research includes topics such as: conceptions of fairness, concern for personal integrity, lasting reputations, company loyalty, preference change during the course of a negotiation, norms for appropriate negotiating behavior, and relational dynamics among negotiators who interact multiple times

In this program, participants will learn how to:

* Leverage their own specific personality traits and abilities to boost negotiation outcomes
* Enhance bargaining power to claim a larger share of the pie
* Recognize and resolve different types of issues to create and claim value
* Develop strategies for efficient pre-negotiation preparation
* Build and maintain working relationships without forfeiting economic outcomes
* Deal with difficult tactics

Powerful negotiators are valued at all levels of an organization. If your responsibilities include interacting in some shape or form with others, then this program is for you. Typical participants' areas of expertise tend to include:

* sales and marketing
* planning and development
* operations management
* strategic partnerships
* supply-chain agreements
* recruitment and human resources

Course material is presented in a series of lectures, discussions, and engaging exercises that provide extensive personalized feedback and are designed to teach participants how to leverage their individual traits to achieve success and build lasting relationships at the bargaining table. Prior to the first day of sessions, participants are strongly encouraged to complete a detailed written questionnaire that will better customize the experience for each individual negotiator.

Faculty
Jared Curhan
Ford International Career Development Professor
Associate Professor of Organizations Studies

Professor Curhan specializes in the psychology of negotiation and conflict resolution. A recipient of support from the National Science Foundation, Curhan has pioneered a social psychological approach to the study of "subjective value" in negotiation (i.e., feelings and judgments concerning the instrumental outcome, the process, the self, and the relationship). His current research uses the Subjective Value Inventory (SVI; Curhan et al., 2006) to examine precursors, processes, and long-term consequences of subjective value in negotiation.

Deeply committed to education at all levels, Curhan received MIT's institute-wide teaching award presented annually by the graduate student council. Curhan is founder and president of the Program for Young Negotiators, Inc., an organization dedicated to the promotion of negotiation training in primary and secondary schools. His book, Young Negotiators (Houghton Mifflin, 1998), is acclaimed in the fields of negotiation and education and has been translated into Spanish, Hebrew and Arabic. The book has been used to train more than 35,000 children across the United States and abroad to achieve their goals without the use of violence.

Cambridge, MA

Implementing Industry 4.0: Leading Change in Manufacturing and Operations

April 4-5, 2017

The term "Industry 4.0" refers to the combination of several major innovations in digital technology that are poised to transform the energy and manufacturing sectors. From advanced robotics and machine learning to software-as-a-service and the Industrial Internet of Things, these changes enable a powerful new way of organizing global operations. But how should executives lead this change within their own organizations so as to not negatively impact production, customer satisfaction, and corporate culture?

Implementing Industry 4.0: Leading Change in Manufacturing & Operations is a new program designed to help executives implement large scale technological change. Topics discussed include:
* New business models and forms of operations that are currently being enabled by technological innovations such as the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)

* The "hidden factory" that results from a counterproductive and unpredictable mix of old and new technologies. Over time, this results in an unknown "process" that delivers defect-laden products behind schedule.
* The importance of decoding cultural and workforce factors prior to making an investment in new technologies
* The overemphasis on visioning at the expense of fully understanding existing systems, the context in which those systems are operating, and the people who must use the technology
Ways to increase a factory’s "IQ," leading to more productive and safer operations
* The role of the front-line leader in the adoption and successful execution of the new technology

Building 32 Map

One of a Series: Biology Colloquium

Dynamics of 3D Cell Migration and Tissue

April 4, 2017, 4-5:15 PM

Dr. Kenneth Yamada
Chief Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology
Head, Cell Biology Division
NIH, Washington, DC

Host: Frank Gerlter

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