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Cambridge, MA

Developing a Leading Edge Operations Strategy

July 27-28, 2017

Enterprises are increasingly complex, with supply chains, manufacturing, and service delivery processes spanning cultures and time zones, geographies and geopolitical situations. To navigate this intricate world filled with new and different kinds of risk, executives need to know how to make the most efficient use of a company?s material, people, and processes; how to manage more complicated global networks; how to optimize service and quality levels of performance; and how to minimize risks yet maintain required capacities. This program will draw on real issues confronting manufacturing and service companies today, providing strategic frameworks to enable executives to make smart choices so their companies can deliver the high-quality products and services they are committed to providing their customers.


Many participants attend this program along with Supply Chain Strategy and Management.

In this program, senior managers will learn new approaches to operations strategy that were developed at MIT and based on best-practice research conducted among the world's leading service and manufacturing companies. Participants will gain an analytic view of operations and strategic insights into:


  • Vertical integration and the factors that affect strategic decisions
  • Process design and process engineering
  • Integration of people systems with technical systems
  • Global facility network strategies and the future of supply chain management
  • Strategic implications of process technologies
  • Capacity and risk management, including capacity factors, supply and demand management
  • Outsourcing, supplier power, and trends in supplier management

Additive Manufacturing: From 3D Printing to the Factory Floor

July 31 - August 4, 2017

This course will build a comprehensive understanding of additive manufacturing (AM) processes and their implications for product development and manufacturing operations. Lectures will analyze AM fundamentals, materials, and process capabilities. This content will then be related to applications spanning industries including aerospace, medical devices, electronics, architecture, and consumer products. Lab sessions will provide hands-on experience with desktop 3D printers. Participants will design, fabricate, and measure components, and will identify future opportunities via case studies.

Additive manufacturing (AM) processes were first demonstrated more than twenty five years ago; however, only recently has broad industrial and consumer interest ignited, with potential implications ranging from ubiquitous personal fabrication to disruption of traditional supply chains. The goal of this course is to present a comprehensive overview of AM, spanning from fundamentals to applications and technology trends. Participants will learn the fundamentals of AM of polymers, metals, composites, and biomaterials, and will realize how process capabilities (rate, cost, quality) are determined by the material characteristics, process parameters, and machine designs. Application areas including aerospace components, electronics, medical devices, and consumer products will be discussed via detailed examples and case studies. Particular emphasis will be placed on emerging metal- and powder-based AM technologies, and related design principles and process standards. Lab sessions will provide hands-on experience with a variety of state-of-the-art desktop 3D printers and scanners. Participants will design, fabricate, and measure test parts, and will perform experiments to explore process limits. The course will conclude with a perspective on needs for future advancement of AM and major opportunities spanning many related business and technical domains.

Climate Change: From Science to Solutions

July 31 - August 4, 2017

The objective of this course is to provide participants with a thorough understanding of the scientific foundation behind anthropogenic climate change, its impacts on the Earth, and strategies to address it. The course introduces the fundamental physical processes that shape climate, focusing on the drivers of past, present, and future climate change. Impacts of climate change on the environment and human societies will be highlighted, including effects on temperature, precipitation, ocean acidity, sea level, severe storms, agriculture, biodiversity, and air quality. Mitigation approaches and adaptation strategies, including technology development, will be introduced, discussed, and critiqued. The course will conclude with an overview of policy and governance considerations in a changing climate. Non-lecture activities will comprise 25% of the course, and will address the contemporary science of climate measurements, models of climate change and impacts, and climate change policy and negotiations.

Who Should Attend:
This course is targeted to environmental scientists, engineers, and consultants who seek a deeper understanding of the science of climate change. Professionals in the energy, finance, insurance/risk mitigation, and food/beverage sectors as well as those working in government, NGOs, and education will also have an interest in this topic.

Downstream Processing

July 31 - August 4, 2017

Continuing discoveries in molecular biology, genetics, and process science provide the foundation for new and improved processes and products in today's biochemical process industry. The production of therapeutic proteins, which is made possible by discoveries in biotechnology, will generate sales exceeding $300 billion in 2016. In addition, biotechnology has led to marked improvement and expansion in the traditional biochemical process industry for production of enzymes, diagnostics, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and foods. Continued introduction of new technology necessitates innovation in process development scale-up and design. As a consequence, there is the need to design new, as well as to improve existing, processes. An integral and cost intensive part of these processes is associated with downstream processing for product isolation and purification.

Who Should Attend

The course covers fundamental principles of downstream processing with practical examples and case studies to illustrate the problems and solutions faced by the practitioner. It is intended to provide both insight into and an overview of downstream processing for individuals actively engaged in process research and development, as well as those who manage and innovate in the biochemical process industry. Increasingly, scientists and engineers engaged in fermentation and cell culture development attend the course to better understand the context of the whole process. Attendees include:

  • Engineers and scientists interested in design, economics, validation optimization and scale-up of biochemical product recovery;
  • Protein biochemists and chemists involved in design of recovery processes;
  • Managers responsible for biochemical process development;
  • Entrepreneurs, attorneys, and business leaders wanting an overview and insight into biochemical manufacturing.

Modeling and Simulation of Transportation Networks

July 31 - August 4, 2017

Modeling and simulation methods are essential elements in the design and operation of transportation systems. Congestion problems in cities worldwide have prompted at all levels of government and industry a proliferation of interest in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) that include advanced supply and demand management techniques. Such techniques include real-time traffic control measures and real-time traveler information and guidance systems whose purpose is to assist travelers in making departure time, mode and route choice decisions. Transportation researchers have developed models and simulators for use in the planning, design and operations of such systems. This course draws heavily on the results of recent research and is sponsored by the Intelligent Transportation Systems Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The course studies theories and applications of transportation network demand and supply models and simulation techniques. It provides an in-depth study of the world's most sophisticated traffic simulation models, demand modeling methods, and related analytical techniques, including discrete choice models and their application to travel choices and driving behavior; origin-destination estimation; prediction of traffic congestion; traffic flow models and simulation methods (microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic); and alternative dynamic traffic assignment methods.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
This program is intended for analysts, engineers, managers and planners, as well as industry, government and academic researchers who seek to understand, analyze and predict performance of transportation systems. Participants with backgrounds in diverse areas such as traffic engineering, systems engineering, transportation planning, operations management, operations research and control systems are welcome.

Product Platform and Product Family Design: From Strategy to Implementation

July 31 - August 4, 2017

This course explores how product architecture, platforms and commonality can help a firm deploy and manage a family of products in a competitive manner. We will examine both strategic as well as implementation aspects of this challenge. A key strategy is to develop and manufacture a family of product variants derived from a common platform and/or modular architecture. Reuse of components, processes and design solutions leads to advantages in learning curves and economies of scale, which have to be carefully balanced against the desire for product customization and competitive pressures. Additionally, platform strategies can lead to innovation and generation of new revenue growth, by intelligently leveraging existing brands, modules, and sub-system technologies. We will present the latest theory as well as a number of case studies and industrial examples on this important topic. We will engage the course participants through interactive discussion and hands-on activities. Recent strategic issues such as embedding flexibility in product platforms as well as the effect of platforms on a firm's cost structure, organization, and market segmentation will also be presented.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
This course is targeted towards executive decision makers, product managers, marketing managers, product line strategists, product architects, as well as platform and systems engineers in industrial and government contexts. Such individuals will have to strategically position their products and systems in a competitive marketplace and define modular and scalable product architectures, utilizing standardization, commonalization, customization and platform leveraging strategies to maximize cost savings while increasing the capability to offer a variety of customized systems and products. A basic background in mechanical and/or electrical engineering, as well as some business and accounting experience is beneficial but not required.

10th Anniversary Symposium
*Symposium registration is now open*

This year, 2016, will be the 10th anniversary of this course. A special symposium will be held on the afternoon of Friday, July 29 and Saturday, July 30 to look at the latest trends in industry and review successful industry case studies presented by past participants. The symposium will include keynote lectures, panel sessions, a digital poster session, and reception. Attendance for the first day of the symposium (Friday afternoon and evening) is included in the course fee. The fee for registrants wishing to also attend the second day of the symposium is $200; the option to add this will be available during checkout. Registration for the symposium alone is $449. Additional details can be found on the symposium information page.

Online.

Internet of Things: Business Implications and Opportunities (self-paced online)

March 15-16, 2018

This 6-week online executive program will look at the field of IoT, which is commonly understood to entail the inter-networking of devices in the physical world by fitting them with sensors and network-connected devices. While most courses today treat IoT as a technological topic, this course takes a different approach. IoT is not a technology, it's a leadership opportunity; a mechanism to transform businesses.


The program aims to help people envision and lead IoT-based transformations, not just understand the technical elements. The goal is to demystify IoT jargon so that managers can start to achieve the strategic advantage IoT makes possible. The course will provide participants with an introduction to the necessary technologies, skill components, and enablers and constraints for using IoT in a business. It provides many examples where IoT is already transforming customer experience, operations and business models. It also explains the four key elements of leadership capability that make transformation possible through IoT. Real-world case studies, senior executive interviews, self-assessments, and practical assignments will guide participants as they construct a personal roadmap to gain strategic advantage from IoT.

Upon completion of this program, participants will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the role of leadership and technological capabilities in implementing IoT for strategic advantage in business
  • Assess the mastery of digital capabilities in an organization
  • Evaluate the mastery of leadership capabilities in an organization
  • Articulate how key IoT technologies can improve organizational productivity and add value
  • Recommend strategies for developing the necessary skills and foundational capabilties to support the implementation of IoT technologies within an organization
  • Create a roadmap for the implementation of IoT in a business context

This executive program integrates rich, interactive media such as videos, infographics, and e-learning activities as well as traditional didactic components such as written study guides (course notes). There are opportunities for collaborative learning through discussion forums to provide participants with a complete overview of the field of IoT in business contexts, including emerging and innovative topics.


The program begins with an Orientation to welcome you to the Online Campus. During Orientation, you will explore your analysis environment, become comfortable with your new online classroom, meet your Success Team, and get to know your fellow classmates.


After Orientation, the course is broken down into six manageable, weekly modules, designed to accelerate your learning process through diverse learning activities:

  • Work through your downloadable and online instructional material
  • Interact with your peers and learning facilitators through weekly class-wide forums and graded small group discussions
  • Enjoy a wide range of interactive content, including video lectures, infographics, live polls, and more
  • Investigate rich, real-world case studies
  • Apply what you learn each week to quiz assessments and ongoing project submissions, culminating in the development of your own IoT roadmap

The time commitment is estimated at 6-8 hours per week, self-paced and entirely online.


SUCCESS TEAM
Throughout the course of the program, you will be supported by a team of professionals.

  • Head Facilitator: A subject expert who?ll guide you through content-related challenges
  • Success Manager: Your one-on-one support available during MIT hours (9am - 5pm EST) to resolve technical and administrative challenges
  • Global Success Team: Available 24/7 to solve your tech-related and administrative queries and concerns

Online

Business Process Design for Strategic Management

August 7 - September 28, 2017

Based on our highly-rated Implementing Improvement Strategies program, this six-week online course broadens access to the knowledge of industry thought leaders such as Nelson Repenning and Donald Kieffer, who integrated decades of industry practice and academic investigation to create Dynamic Work Design. The online program offers those who would previously be limited in accessing the on-campus course the opportunity to engage with a portion of the content in a flexible and personalized way, through a highly collaborative and supportive online environment. You?ll learn to implement improvement strategies naturally in your everyday work, not from a prescribed list, but from a deep personal understanding of the principles.


Unplanned events happen in all businesses - from communication breakdowns and the rise and fall of costs, to tighter turnaround times and employee disengagement. Use these pain points to lead improvement strategies and innovation in your organization with this online program which will expose you to the principles and development of Dynamic Work Design from the very creators of this sustainable operations improvement methodology. This program aims to teach you how to implement continuous improvement strategies into your organization?s work design, as well as change the way you think about your own work and role as a leader within a particular area of improvement.


You?ll develop an understanding of how to go about implementing improvement strategies; why improvement strategies usually fail; the psychological reasons behind learning, change, and motivation; principles of good work design; and how to go about problem solving effectively. The program culminates in the identification of issues within your organization and the development of a structured problem-solving document based on the A3 approach to continuous improvement which was first employed at Toyota and successfully adopted by many companies.

This program is delivered in collaboration with GetSmarter. Please register on the GetSmarter website.

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